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Found 11 results

  1. It is with a good bit of giddy enthusiasm that we share our very first Jurassic dinosaur fossils. We have a start to our Morrison Formation collection and I am so excited to take these into class. This is also a proud moment because my son and I earned these fossils with our hard work. This is a gift to our program from us and a gift to the kids we want to educate. They are also big hunks of dino bone. We needed a couple of larger bones for these programs for visual flair and these fit the bill for our budget. It will be a week before they arrive but I am too excited to wait lol One of the things we learned from our first dinosaur program was that 2nd graders learn about Diplodocus when they study dinosaurs. It was a species they knew. So we purchased a partial Diplo coracoid bone. It is a 15" x 11" x 9" hunk of dinosaur bone that weighs 12 lbs. Our largest and heaviest fossil. This one will really get the attention of the kids I think and gives us a the opportunity to feature Diplo in the program We also added two partial Camarasaurus ribs that fused together during fossilization. It is 14" x 9" so it is good sized and is a great example of the geological process they are learning about. This gives us an additional Sauropod to cover in the program and lest us talk more about niches. This will be a great fossil for the kids to touch as well. We are also adding a few pounds of chunkasaurus bones. Perfect dino fossils for hands on exploration and a few special give away dino bones too. The pictures are not great, not sure why but I will upload more when they arrive. Here are the big ones.... Picture 1- Diplo coracoid Picture 2 Cam ribs
  2. Dinosaur Verts (Maybe)

    I need some ID help/education. I saw a few vertebra for sale and they are in my price range so I thought I would put them on the forum and gather some more informed opinions about these. First up is a "Raptor" vertebra from Hell Creek. It is around .8" x.5" inches. I lack the skills to determine if it is dinosaurian let alone raptor but my gut says likely not.
  3. For the most part I am pretty happy with our collection so far and pretty satisfied with the fossils for our presentation. I know we are lacking a couple of items that kids will really dig. I am working on picking up a low quality, cheap Tyrannosaur tooth that the kids can handle. I know that is something kids will LOVE. I am close to having a Jurassic sauropod bone so we will have something soon that represents the massive size of a dino. Beyond that, I know what I want to add but not the order. Most of the next round of purchases will be bone not teeth. Dromaeosaurid teeth are an exception but the next few additions really need to be bones. Part of why kids dig dinosaurs so much is they were huge animals. Bones give a much better representation of that size than teeth do. I picked up on the basics of identifying dinosaur teeth pretty quickly but bones are a different. I am working on a basic anatomy lesson on dinosaurs for myself. I study for about a half a night as that is all the time I have right now. Feeling okay about basic dinosaur anatomy is a good thing but learning about the fossil bones as collectibles is pretty scary. I see bones all over the place so I am not worried about finding them. It is EVERYTHING else about that worries me. Figuring out if they are even dinosaur bones is pretty hard for me at this point. I see bones that look to be chunkasaurus to me but are labeled with a species. I also see a lot of fragments that have not only have species but are labeled as ribs or verts or limb bones. Where are the ID"S coming from? How does anybody know that fragment is a Triceratops limb bone? To me it seems a clear cut case of dealers wanting a species to move product. I get why it occurs but it is not helpful. For somebody new to this, it is pretty crazy to see so many bones with species attached. I avoid most of the bones I am seeing right now. I simply do not trust my knowledge and I do not trust a lot of what I see. I have taken to assuming most of what I see is not identified correctly. I may not know a lot about dinosaur bones but it has to be snarge near impossible to ID a fragment of bone to species level or even family level. This makes it hard to trust peoples identifications when it comes to bones that are probably more diagnostic. I am doing my best to study my bones and I am putting in the time to really increase my knowledge. I have already learned not to rely on dealer ID's but the bones take time to learn. Each dinosaur is different so you have to know quite a bit. I made a list of the bones we want to add and I study those 5 or 6 which I find helpful. I avoid impulse buys and I am very cautious. I will also use the forum more before I am ready to buy something. I plan on posting bones I see come up and get more informed opinions and developing resources. I have a few dealers that I do trust so that will help too. I think for the bones, developing connections and fostering relationships will be really helpful but I am still finding sources for fossils so my connections are limited. My advice to my fellow newbies is go slow and learn as much as you can. Invest your in knowledge before you invest in the fossils. Be careful and get ID's verified before you buy. I wish you all luck in your collections and good luck with dem bones
  4. Today is my last day off before I go back to work and I was supposed to spend the day making fossil starter kits. I have a cold though and I do not want the kids to think that 12 million year old shark teeth gave them a cold lol I am pretty bored so I thought I would post about our Judith River dinosaur fossils and how we are going to get discuss this formation. I am really surprised how much I am enjoying learning about these dinosaurs and this will be a formation that we spend a good bit of time on. It must have had some very productive ecosystems and there is a great diversity here to discuss. The kids will also get to see some familiar dinosaur families while learning about species that are new to them. I think during adaptation related presentations, this formation lets us get into ecological niches and discuss how two Tyrannosaurids existed as did at least two species of Dromaeosaurids and a Troodonitd plus other predators including non dinos. That is a lot of hungry mouths so niche selection and adaptations become very important. THere is also a great diversity of herbivores in this formation. I love the Ceratopsians from this formation and the diversity gives my son a lot of artistic options. We currently have one tooth but by the time we present we will have a couple more I think. This allows us to present a few species and say the teeth are not diagnostic so the teeth could have belonged to one or more really cool looking horned dinosaurs. This also gives the kids knowledge that there other Ceratopsians besides Triceratops. This will also be the point where we introduce Dromaeosaurids. Raptors are just iconic and this formation gives us the chance to really hit on adaptations. We have a Saurornitholestes tooth and will soon have a Dormaeosaurid caudal vertebra. While not assigned specifically to Dromaeosaurus, the vert will presented that way so we can talk about the differences between the two raptors. Of particular interest is the larger skull, more robust teeth, and specific wear patterns on the teeth of Dromaeosaurus. We will also have a small tooth tip from a Tyrannosaur indet. The kids will love learning about other Tyrannosaurids and I will leave it to the kids to imagine which one it belonged to. The real owner of the tooth is not important. That two existed in this formation is what is important. They must have occupied different niches plus a lot of kids may think T-Rex was the only member of that family. The last fossil I know we will have from Judith River is one of my favorites. It is an Ankylosaurus tooth and thanks to some help from TFF members, I spotted this among a few Nodosaur teeth. In our inventory, this is Ankylosaurus indet. However, in every single dinosaur presentation we do this will be Zuul and it will be a rock star. We want the kids to understand that there are many new discoveries being made and there will be a lot of new dinosaur discoveries made by THEIR generation. Everything about Zuul will be cool to kids. It is the one of the most incredible fossils ever found, armored dinosaurs are just cool, and it even has a pop culture name that a lot of kids will recognize from Ghostbusters lol Only 5 fossils but we can do A LOT of quality education with these fossils. I also have a very clear idea of the next items to find from Judith River. #1 on that list is a Dromaeosaurus tooth. A tooth gives us the perfect way of illustrating the difference between the raptors. We have two more purchases to complete before I buy again so I will save up and in the spring I start searching for that tooth. I also would love to add a hadrosaur bone from this formation and eventually I will track down a frill piece. Anyway, here a couple of the fossils... Pic 1- our Saurornitholestes tooth. Not a great picture but a really nice tooth. Pic 2- the Dormaeosaurid indet vert. Not here yet but will be right around my B-day. Pic 3- the Anky tooth. It is just a cool tooth and Zuul is a great dinosaur to teach kids about so Zuul is what this tooth is for Fossils on Wheels. Our only fossil from an armored dinosaur.
  5. I have been working hard lately on all of our programs and we are very close to having the dinosaur presentation I want us to have. We have a name for this program, Dinos Rock. Yes it is not super creative but for 2nd graders, this is a geology themed program. For 3rd graders, it is adaptation based but the name works. We have added some pieces that gives us more than a few teeth. Nothing museum quality or anything but a few bones help the visual factor. I have been studying the biology, geology and ecology of dinosaurs so the science will be good. my son is working on the art but we wont have any done soon, he has school projects a head of this. We are close to being ready a full 6 months before I thought we would be. Hell Creek was going to be a focus for us because the fossils are available and this is the fauna that most kids will recognize. If you are willing to look hard, you can also find some real bargains from this formation. We turned a lot of early attention collecting attention to Hell Creek dinosaurs and I am actually really happy with where we are at with the fossil material we have. There is a lot of room to add and maybe upgrade in the future but this is a good start. This is the famous T-Rex and Triceratops fauna and we started our collection with those critters. Very early on, we were able to get a few Hell CreekTriceratops teeth. I am very happy that through a purchase from TFF member, we added two frill pieces. They are Lance formation but we are not covering the Lance formation yet so they will be used here. I also added a frill piece from Hell Creek. The kids will get to touch the largest frill piece which is a great bonus. An iconic dinosaur and I think well represented. Also early on, we stumbled into a great bit of a luck. A TFF member saw a post of ours and passed it on to another TFF member who sold us a beautiful Tyrannosaurus Rex partial tooth and gave us a really nice Nano too. It was very affordable and a generous gift was added that gave us nice pieces from the most famous dinosaur ever. The rock star really. I was not sure we would be able to get a decent example at all but to do it right off the bat was HUGE. This would not have happened if not for the members that decided to help us out. We are extremely grateful The first dinosaur fossil we got were two Hell Creek Edmontosaurus teeth that were a gift. We acquired a nice jaw fragment in a trade. I am a bargain shopper with a limited budget so I LOVE our Edmontosaurus as it has not cost much at all. I named this display Eddie I like it so much lol Hadrosaurs are important dinosaurs to talk about and I think a fair amount of kids may not know about them. I would like to add another bone later too. They seem attainable for us. Acheroraptor was behind only T-rex on the my list and we got a really beautiful tooth and it was another bargain pick up. I will talk a lot about this species and I will get deep into the biology/ecology of this awesome dino because I love Dromaeosaurids. Raptors are also an iconic dinosaur that kids love and this is a relatively new species which is another fun thing to discuss with the kids. We will also be introducing the kids to a theropod they have never heard of, Richardoestesia gilmorei. I have told me son to envision a toothed Cormorant type dinosaur as I lean toward them being a fish eater. It is pretty cool to get a Hell Creek dino that they will not know anything about. We have yet to add a Thescelosaurus fossil but we will before we start presenting. I want to add another piece of the fauna and it seems this is the most inexpensive option we will have. It will also give the kids another dinosaur they probably do not know and it will round out the basic Hell Creek fauna. There is no shortage of dinosaurs that we can add either. An Anky or Nodosaur scute is way up on the program list of fossils for me and hopefully we can find one from this formation. Dakotaraptor is #1 on my personal list and I will get one eventually. A Troodontid is also very high on the list as well. I know eventually i will also pick up an Ornithominid too. All three of these are more expensive so we will have to save and wait but each one would also make awesome educational dinosaurs. I also really want to add an Avian fossil. I have not researched this but my guess is they are very rare. Leptoceratops is another species I would love to add at some point too. They are really cute and kids will dig them. Anyway, here are some of the fossils. I think we have a good start going to our Hell Creek collection and I am looking forward to taking these to work with me very soon. Pic 1- Triceratops teeth and Eddie Pic 2- T-Rex, Nano, and Hell's Thief. I am so happy to have these fossils. Pic 3- One of the frill pieces. This one will end up in a larger Trike display with more teeth and another frill. Plus we will have nice frill for kids to check out too.
  6. Judith River Dino Id Help

    All of these items are from the same dealer and I am looking for some ID help. I researched these as much as I could on my own but I can only get some far with the knowledge I have. All of these come from the Judith River formation. For our education programs to really be solid, we need to expand beyond just teeth. We do have an Edmontosaurus jaw fragment and will soon have some Ceratopsian frill pieces plus some bones fragments from the Morrison Formation. I think it would be a good idea to augment the small dromaeosaurid teeth we have a bone or two so I am trying to understand this part of dinosaur collecting better before I make a purchase. I do not want to repeat the error I made with the Troodon vert (which did have a happy ending as the dealer graciously agreed to exchange that for a frill piece). Any help on this is greatly appreciated. The first one is listed as a the pedal phalanx from a Dromaeosaurus. I looked over as many photos as I could find of dromaeosaurid phalanx bones. It does look similar to several photos I found. I have a few questions on this one. Is this the phalanx of a dromaeosaurid dinosaur ? Second question is more of a general question. Can you even determine a genus or species based on an isolated phalanx? The second one is listed as a distal caudal vertebra of a Dromaeosaurus. This one was far more difficult to find anything to reference on the internet. I found nothing that could give me an insight as to whether or not this is a dromaeosaurid vertebra. Is this is from a dromaeosaurid dinosaur or any kind of theropod for that matter ? I have a pretty good idea now of what to ask dealers when it comes to theropod teeth but isolated bones are pretty new to me. Are there questions that I can ask of the dealer to further the ID process? Thank you in advance for any assistance you can provide
  7. Today is my last day off of work which means I have time to do fossil stuff. It is also the last day for a little while that I will be discussing dinosaur fossil very much. We have shark programs starting at the end of this month so my mind has to get back on the sharks. Dinosaurs go on the back burner again for awhile. I will post a bit more of the collection but I also wanted to share a little bit about my experience with Jurassic dinosaur fossils during the early stage of building our collection. Hopefully it provides something useful to another collector. As we started window shopping in preparation for beginning a dinosaur collection, one thing stood out about fossils from the Jurassic era. They are expensive. The prices are so far out of my range that I did not bother to research them beyond the ones we first encountered from various dealers. I would have to sell a kidney to get a hold of anything from that era. I saw sauropod teeth for up to 2500$ and none under 600. Don't get me started on theropods from that era. It all looked just too expensive. Our collection is built on inexpensive fossils from formations (Bull Canyon, Kem Kem, Judith River, Hell Creek) that produce some great bargain stuff. i saw nothing in the way of bargain fossils from the Jurassic beyond bits of bone or bits of bone assigned a species even though I doubt you could assign a species to those bits. They are chunkasaurus not Camarasaurus is my theory lol Anyway, I had little belief that we would add anything Jurassic except for the chunkasaurus bones for kids to handle. It did bother me though that we would have a glaring hole in the program. Kids associate the Jurassic era with dinosaurs and vice versa thanks to the movies Jurassic Park. Even if the dinosaurs from those movies were not Jurassic, the word association is unavoidable. I decided to back track the origins of the super expensive fossils from that era. I have a theory that there has to be a primary source for all of those high priced dealer bones. I think one or two entities probably supply the vast majority of fossils from the Morrison Formation which seems the primary formation for North America fossils out there. I think I was successful in the attempt to find one of the sources of the fossils. I have seen affordable Jurassic fossils for the first time and I would tend to trust the ID's because these folks dug them up. I suspect season collectors will the know the folks I am talking about. I saw a few fossils that were in the price range that we set for ourselves. It is not a lot of money at all but I saw fossils that we CAN get. We can not buy right now. The Judith River Anky and I are in a firmly committed relationship so until that tooth comes home, I am frozen on purchasing for a bit lol I do have a source though and time to start learning about Jurassic dinosaur fossils before I buy any. I know the general profile of what type of dinosaur fossil we will add. It will be a bone, not a tooth, of a sauropod. It will give us a Jurassic dinosaur to fill that blank space in the program plus it would give us some visual flair. Point is...... a little bit of above ground virtual digging can unearth the fossils you want even if they at first seem to expensive to afford. Be patient, be diligent, do your homework, and you can build a pretty awesome dinosaur collection, with out going broke
  8. On to the Dinos. As I mentioned in an earlier post, I found some helpful information here about the Triassic fossil material from Bull Canyon before we started collecting the fossils so I knew going in that some of the dinosaur stuff may not be dinosaur at all or at least it may not be the dinosaur that they are sold as. The fossils are educational so we will present them as we purchased them while noting the uncertainty in documenting our collection. We want to do what we do with the sharks and start our programs as far back in the evolutionary line as we can get. Bull Canyon gives us possible dinosaur fossils that represent very early dinosaurs. The kids will likely not know much about early dinosaurs so these fossils are important in giving us that bridge. We bought three very small, and inexpensive, "Coelophysis" teeth. One of them looks that it could be a dinosaur tooth while the other two are probably not. I found a great piece by Troodon here that outlined what to look for in Bull Canyon teeth and using his profile of what to look for from a dinosaur tooth from Bull Canyon, I contacted the dealer I bought them from. He is going to find us one that fits that profile so I feel good that we will have one or two Triassic Theropod teeth. If they are actually Coelophysis or not is not a concern. That is the species we are presenting to the kids because they are such a well known early dinosaur. The kids can learn more about them on their own and they may get really interested in early dinosaurs if we can connect them to one. It gives a an opportunity to touch on basic theropod biology and get into evolution. We also got a small and inexpensive "Prosauropod" tooth. I did know before buying it that no diagnostic prosauropod fossils had been found in Bull Canyon. I can accept that this one is unlikely to be prosauropod but we are still going to present it as one because the kids will really enjoy hearing about the forerunners of the very well known Long necks. I do not have all the science info set for this part of the presentation. I am still learning about early dinosaurs. I do not think we will be able to add much to this part of the dinosaur program. There does not seem to be a lot of fossil material available so i think this will have to be enough. Pic 1 our tiny collection of tiny Triassic "dinosaur" teeth.
  9. Back in November of last year, my son and I decided to start our own education non-profit. We wanted to combine his artwork, my teaching skills, and real fossils to create a museum on wheels that takes fun field trips to the classrooms. We had shark teeth and marine mammal fossils so we started building education programs around those. I am very satisfied where those two programs are at though I would love to expand the number of shark species we can present but that is a story for a different day. We knew we would need to get a dinosaur program going at some point but I know nothing about dinosaur fossils so I did not want to start collecting yet. My plan was to wait until late spring or early summer to start building our collection. A friend gave us two hadrosaur teeth and a Hypselosaurus egg shell piece in December so our program got started earlier than planned. As we do with every decision, my son and I talked about picking up a few bargain dinosaur fossils while we tightened up the other programs which are debuting in March. One of the first things I did was join TFF. I was very intimidated by dinosaur fossils and I hoped this place would help me educate myself. I have been a quiet observer so far and have not engaged very much with the dinosaur experts here. I have read a lot of posts and this has been so incredibly helpful. Utilizing the expertise of the members here has also saved me money and stopped me from making one unwise purchase. I have only picked up a few dinosaur items up to this point but without being on this site, I doubt I would have made any attempt at starting this particular collection so soon. I am very grateful for the forum and its members because a lot of people really want to help. I quickly learned that our presentation will be centered on the Hell Creek fauna and we can augment it with some African dinosaurs. After a bit of window shopping, it became apparent right away that Jurassic period dinosaurs were simply too expensive for us. There is no way we will be able to purchase any and trades are unlikely as we just do not have much material that would have much trade value. I can live with this though. If we focus on the T-rex/Ceratopsian fauna of Hell Creek we are giving kids species they know plus introducing them to new species which I am totally cool with. We also decided we could talk Triassic dinosaurs with kids using Bull Canyon fossils. Now I am an avid reader here so I am aware that there is some debate about the species that are found in Bull Canyon and how things are labeled by dealers but I did pick some up because we want to teach kids about the evolution of dinosaurs and to give them a few species that have never heard of. I can not be sure if the teeth I have are Coelophysis teeth but we are still going to present them as such to the students because it is an opportunity to get to early dinosaurs. Same goes for a "prosauropod" tooth we purchased. We are not going to sell the fossils so the correct ID is less important to us than being able to at least have a representation of early dinosaurs for the kiddos. Our early efforts were given a huge boost when a member here helped broker a transaction between another member which resulted in us having a very nice partial T-rex and a Nano. This was huge for us. We got the centerpiece species and it was super affordable. I am still in a bit of shock to be honest and incredibly grateful. We also picked up some inexpensive Hell Creek Triceratops teeth. I found a nice Saurornitholestes from Judith River which gives us a "raptor" fossil for the kids. I got an inexpensive Moroccan sauropod tooth which gives us a "long neck" that we can use. It is really not a bad start in my eyes. We picked some species that we really wanted to include. We also have begun to find some teeth that kids can handle in the form of partial or shed Ceratopsian teeth and inexpensive Spinosaurus teeth from Morocco. I only made one questionable decision. I did not use TFF and ended up misidentifying a tooth. This led us to having two Richardoesstesia gilmorei teeth. We really did not need two fossils from this species but it was a learning experience. I learned that I need keep studying, learning and using the forum. Had I put it here first, instead of testing my own skills, I would not have picked it up . I would have filled another need in the program. Lesson learned and the upside is that I do have a dinosaur fossil I can possibly trade. It is not much for trade I am sure, but maybe I can use it to get a fossil that fills a hole in the program. The most important thing I have learned so far is that I really enjoy collecting dinosaur fossils. I am hooked. I was never a dinosaur kid myself. I preferred sharks and whales but I am really captivated by dinosaurs now. I have been cramming my brain with scientific information about dinosaurs and my son is really enjoying getting a start on his dino artwork. We have a long way to go before we are ready to unleash our budding dino education program. I have a long way to go with my own knowledge too. I do know it will be a lot of fun to learn and I am looking forward to getting more interactive with the dinosaur collectors here. We have settled on the next round of dinosaurs to add (Acheroraptor, Ankylosaur, Pachycephalosaurus, a Troodontid, plus more Ceratopsian material) and they seem attainable so I am excited to get to work on those in the near future. I also learned there are species from the Hell Creek formation that are awesome but we will never have due to price or rarity lol Dakotaraptor is #1 on that list but the avian dinosaurs are not far behind. All things considered, I am super happy with our tiny dinosaur collection and I am really enjoying the hunt for more !!
  10. Hello, I was browsing through our favorite auction site, when I stumbled upon an offer for a Stegosaurus rib fragment. The price was quite low, especially compared to offers from other sellers. I generally don't trust online auctions, so I wanted to make sure what I was buying was really a Stegosaurus rib fragment. If you find that this rib belongs to another dinosaur, please tell me. Could you help me? I know the pic isn't of great quality, and I don't know if a way of getting a better photo.
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