Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'dinosaur tooth'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • blogs_blog_99
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Books I have enjoyed
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101
  • Trip Reports
  • Glendive Montana dinosaur bone Hell’s Creek
  • Ladonia Texas Fossil Park

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

  1. Decided to make a thread with an update on my collection with better photos and (currently) up to date info on everything with names and location. Sauropods Jobaria tiguidensis (Diplodocoidea) Jurassic (Bathonian-Oxfordian) Tiourarén Formation Marraba, Agadez Region, Niger Size: 1” Sauropoda indet. (Saltasaurus cf.?) (Titanosaur) Cretaceous (Campanian-Maastrichtian) Allen Formation Rio Province, Argentina Size: 1” Rebbachisaurus garasbe (Rebbachisauridae) Cretaceous (Cenomia
  2. ThePhysicist

    A Physicist's Collection

    While my prime focus is essentially learning how to accurately describe Nature in the precise language of mathematics, I've always been intrigued by natural history - it's actually what started me on the path to physics. The sort of interrogation that paleontology practices provoked me to think and question even further, down to the fundamental science which makes it all work. Collecting fossils has brought a large amount of enjoyment to my life, and is often a welcome distraction from what can sometimes be straining work. The knowledge that I accumulate along the way is also part
  3. ThePhysicist

    Acrocanthosaurus tooth

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Not mine - belongs to a university. I want to say it is about 3 inches in length. I cannot remember exactly where it was found, but I do know it was an isolated tooth found in Texas. Quite a rare and awesome tooth to see in person.
  4. ThePhysicist

    Edmontosaurus tooth histology

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Edmontosaurus annectens Hell Creek Fm., Harding Co., SD, USA Partial dental battery Hadrosaurs had the most histologically complex teeth of any animal, with six unique tissues. This allowed for differential wear, creating an ideal coarse surface for grinding plant matter. (Erickson et al. (2012))
  5. ThePhysicist

    Triceratops prorsus

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    Triceratops prorsus Hell Creek Fm., Harding Co., SD, USA More information
  6. From the album: Dinosaurs

    A juxtaposition of the bases of two juvenile Tyrannosaurid tooth crowns from the Hell Creek Formation. Nanotyrannus: Dawson Co., MT Tyrannosaurus: Carter Co., MT
  7. DenverEdge

    Judith River Ceratopsian tooth?

    I just got another possible Judith River shed tooth out of a different piece of matrix. While in the matrix ceratopsian was suggested. I’m hoping it’s not a pebble this time. Just over a quarter inch in length
  8. ThePhysicist

    Tyrannosaur distal denticles

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Tyrannosauridae Hell Creek Fm., Powder River Co., MT, USA ~ 3.6 / mm Notice that the enamel is still clear, with the dentine visible underneath. If Nanotyrannus is valid, then this is Nanotyrannus.
  9. ThePhysicist

    Hell Creek Tyrannosaur

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Tyrannosauridae Hell Creek Fm., Powder River Co., MT, USA If Nanotyrannus is valid, then this is Nanotyrannus.
  10. ThePhysicist

    Tyrannosaur tooth tip

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Tyrannosauridae Hell Creek Fm., Powder River Co., MT, USA If Nanotyrannus is valid, then this is Nanotyrannus. Note that the serrations wrap around the tip ("apex") of the tooth as is common in unworn Tyrannosaurs.
  11. Darwin and Wallace

    Need ID for Two Medicine Tyrannosaur teeth

    Hello all, I need some help ID'ing these two tyrannosaur teeth from the Two Medicine Formation in Montana. Does anyone know how to tell the difference between Gorgosaurus and Daspletosaurus teeth based on this size? Thanks for any help.
  12. Het Patel

    Fossilized tooth?

    I got this tooth from the soil which was brought from the mountain to our house.
  13. ThePhysicist

    Dromaeosaurid Tooth

    Identification: This is a typical Dromaeosaurid tooth, with the serrations being differently-sized on each carina; the denticles are much smaller on the mesial carina compared to the distal carina. There's also slight recurvature, which is common in Dromaeosaurs. There are no other features present that allow for identification beyond Family. Described Dromaeosaurs in the Hell Creek Formation include Acheroraptor temertyorum and Dakotaraptor steini. Because both of their known dentitions are incomplete, this tooth may belong to either, or another undescribed Dromaeosaur. Identificati
  14. ThePhysicist

    Dromaeosauridae distal serrations

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Dromaeosauridae indet. (Velociraptorine?) Hell Creek Fm., Carter Co., MT, USA Crown height: ~ 10 mm ~ 4.5 serrations / mm (distal) NB: "hooking" serrations near the tip, characteristic of members of Velociraptorinae (Currie (1995)).
  15. ThePhysicist

    Dromaeosauridae mesial serrations

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Dromaeosauridae indet. (Velociraptorine?) Hell Creek Fm., Carter Co., MT, USA Crown height: ~ 10 mm ~ 8 serrations / mm (mesial)
  16. ThePhysicist

    Juvenile Tyrannosaurus rex (2)

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Tyrannosaurus rex (Juvenile) Hell Creek Fm., Garfield Co., MT, USA ~ 13 mm crown height ^wonderful art by RJ Palmer Fossil in Collections: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/collections-database/chordata/dinosaurs/juvenile-tyrannosaurus-rex-tooth-r2081/ The lighting wasn't very good, so I might redo this photoshoot later.
  17. ThePhysicist

    Triceratops prorsus (2)

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Triceratops prorsus Hell Creek Fm., Harding Co., SD, USA 3.5 cm height On the ranch where this tooth was found, only T. prorsus skulls have been found in the 30+ years the company has operated there, lending a very probable, precise identification for this Ceratopsian tooth. (T. prorsus was one of the last dinosaurs, younger than T. horridus. The two species are also stratigraphically separated in the Hell Creek Fm., so it makes sense that one may only find one species in a particular deposit.) For most Ceratopsid teeth (from the Hell Creek Fm., for example),
  18. ThePhysicist

    Triceratops prorsus Tooth

    Identification: On the ranch where this tooth was found, only T. prorsus skulls have been found in the 30+ years the company has operated there, lending a very probable, precise identification for this Ceratopsian tooth. (T. prorsus was one of the last dinosaurs, younger than T. horridus. The two species are also stratigraphically separated in the Hell Creek Fm.[2], so it makes sense that one may only find one species in a particular deposit.) For most Ceratopsid teeth (from the Hell Creek Fm., for example), only association with an identifiable skull can allow for identification beyond C
  19. ThePhysicist

    Saurornitholestes langstoni

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Saurornitholestes langstoni Judith River Fm., Fergus Co., MT, USA ~ 9 mm crown height This tooth has wear facets at the tip/apex.
  20. This tooth is Tyrannosauridae tooth from china! I think it's Qianzhousaurus or bigger tyrannosaurid(Tarbosaurus or Zhuchengtyrannus). Size 3.1 inches. Very rare and big size. Discovered area : Nanxiong Formation, Jiangxi Province, China
  21. Bunch o fossils

    Dino tooth?

    So I went to the beach, to find this tooth looking fossil. I am unsure on whether it is anything special and need to know just in case here is a pic. of it
  22. ThePhysicist

    Triceratops prorsus

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Triceratops prorsus Hell Creek Fm., Harding Co., SD, USA This is a nice tooth with great enamel, partially rooted, and has some feeding wear (which I enjoy). It does have some repair/consolidation. Usually, Ceratopsian teeth are indistinguishable from each other. In HC, Torosaurus and Triceratops (currently) are the valid genera. However, the company operating on the ranch where this tooth was found has only found T. prorsus skulls in the 30+ years they've been there. This tooth, being found in the same deposit, therefore has a good probability of bein
  23. ThePhysicist

    T. prorsus feeding wear

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    A Triceratops tooth from the Hell Creek Fm., Harding Co., SD.
×
×
  • Create New...