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  1. Darwin and Wallace

    Need ID for Two Medicine Tyrannosaur teeth

    Hello all, I need some help ID'ing these two tyrannosaur teeth from the Two Medicine Formation in Montana. Does anyone know how to tell the difference between Gorgosaurus and Daspletosaurus teeth based on this size? Thanks for any help.
  2. Het Patel

    Fossilized tooth?

    I got this tooth from the soil which was brought from the mountain to our house.
  3. Decided to make a thread with an update on my collection with better photos and (currently) up to date info on everything with names and location. Sauropods Jobaria tiguidensis (Diplodocoidea) Jurassic (Bathonian-Oxfordian) Tiourarén Formation Marraba, Agadez Region, Niger Size: 1” Sauropoda indet. (Saltasaurus cf.?) (Titanosaur) Cretaceous (Campanian-Maastrichtian) Allen Formation Rio Province, Argentina Size: 1” Rebbachisaurus garasbe (Rebbachisauridae) Cretaceous (Cenomia
  4. ThePhysicist

    Dromaeosaurid Tooth

    Identification: This is a typical Dromaeosaurid tooth, with the serrations being differently-sized on each carina; the denticles are much smaller on the mesial carina compared to the distal carina. There's also slight recurvature, which is common in Dromaeosaurs. There are no other features present that allow for identification beyond Family. Described Dromaeosaurs in the Hell Creek Formation include Acheroraptor temertyorum and Dakotaraptor steini. Because both of their known dentitions are incomplete, this tooth may belong to either, or another undescribed Dromaeosaur. Identificati
  5. ThePhysicist

    A Physicist's Collection

    While my prime focus is essentially learning how to accurately describe Nature in the precise language of mathematics, I've always been intrigued by natural history - it's actually what started me on the path to physics. The sort of interrogation that paleontology practices provoked me to think and question even further, down to the fundamental science which makes it all work. Collecting fossils has brought a large amount of enjoyment to my life, and is often a welcome distraction from what can sometimes be straining work. The knowledge that I accumulate along the way is also part
  6. ThePhysicist

    Dromaeosauridae distal serrations

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Dromaeosauridae indet. (Velociraptorine?) Hell Creek Fm., Carter Co., MT, USA Crown height: ~ 10 mm ~ 4.5 serrations / mm (distal) NB: "hooking" serrations near the tip, characteristic of members of Velociraptorinae (Currie (1995)).
  7. ThePhysicist

    Dromaeosauridae mesial serrations

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Dromaeosauridae indet. (Velociraptorine?) Hell Creek Fm., Carter Co., MT, USA Crown height: ~ 10 mm ~ 8 serrations / mm (mesial)
  8. ThePhysicist

    Juvenile Tyrannosaurus rex (2)

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Tyrannosaurus rex (Juvenile) Hell Creek Fm., Garfield Co., MT, USA ~ 13 mm crown height ^wonderful art by RJ Palmer Fossil in Collections: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/collections-database/chordata/dinosaurs/juvenile-tyrannosaurus-rex-tooth-r2081/ The lighting wasn't very good, so I might redo this photoshoot later.
  9. ThePhysicist

    Triceratops prorsus (2)

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Triceratops prorsus Hell Creek Fm., Harding Co., SD, USA 3.5 cm height On the ranch where this tooth was found, only T. prorsus skulls have been found in the 30+ years the company has operated there, lending a very probable, precise identification for this Ceratopsian tooth. (T. prorsus was one of the last dinosaurs, younger than T. horridus. The two species are also stratigraphically separated in the Hell Creek Fm., so it makes sense that one may only find one species in a particular deposit.) For most Ceratopsid teeth (from the Hell Creek Fm., for example),
  10. ThePhysicist

    Triceratops prorsus Tooth

    Identification: On the ranch where this tooth was found, only T. prorsus skulls have been found in the 30+ years the company has operated there, lending a very probable, precise identification for this Ceratopsian tooth. (T. prorsus was one of the last dinosaurs, younger than T. horridus. The two species are also stratigraphically separated in the Hell Creek Fm.[2], so it makes sense that one may only find one species in a particular deposit.) For most Ceratopsid teeth (from the Hell Creek Fm., for example), only association with an identifiable skull can allow for identification beyond C
  11. ThePhysicist

    Saurornitholestes langstoni

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Saurornitholestes langstoni Judith River Fm., Fergus Co., MT, USA ~ 9 mm crown height This tooth has wear facets at the tip/apex.
  12. This tooth is Tyrannosauridae tooth from china! I think it's Qianzhousaurus or bigger tyrannosaurid(Tarbosaurus or Zhuchengtyrannus). Size 3.1 inches. Very rare and big size. Discovered area : Nanxiong Formation, Jiangxi Province, China
  13. Bunch o fossils

    Dino tooth?

    So I went to the beach, to find this tooth looking fossil. I am unsure on whether it is anything special and need to know just in case here is a pic. of it
  14. ThePhysicist

    Triceratops prorsus

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Triceratops prorsus Hell Creek Fm., Harding Co., SD, USA This is a nice tooth with great enamel, partially rooted, and has some feeding wear (which I enjoy). It does have some repair/consolidation. Usually, Ceratopsian teeth are indistinguishable from each other. In HC, Torosaurus and Triceratops (currently) are the valid genera. However, the company operating on the ranch where this tooth was found has only found T. prorsus skulls in the 30+ years they've been there. This tooth, being found in the same deposit, therefore has a good probability of bein
  15. ThePhysicist

    T. prorsus feeding wear

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    A Triceratops tooth from the Hell Creek Fm., Harding Co., SD.
  16. Hi everyone, found this in a new jersey cretaceous creek. Looks like a partial enamel something but I'm not exactly sure what it can possibly be from, it interestingly has some very defined ridges on the least worn side. Very hard to catch the clearest pics to show the sharpest definition but I tried to get the best I could. Maybe this can be a clue to a potential id. Pictures of it with whiteish background are upside down.
  17. ThePhysicist

    Saurornitholestes

    Identification: Dromaeosaurs have differently-sized serrations on each carina, the ones on the distal carina being much larger and pronounced than the mesial ones. The mesial carina also has a classic twist. Notes: This tooth has feeding wear facets on both the labial and lingual sides of the tip. Citation: SUES, HANS-DIETER, 1978. A new small theropod dinosaur from the Judith River Formation (Campanian) of Alberta Canada, Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, Volume 62, Issue 4, April, Pages 381–400, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1096-3642.1978.tb01049.x
  18. Hi all, I have several sauropod teeth from the Yixian Formation of Liaoning that I need help identifying. This is Tooth 1 - White Length: 44 mm Formation: Jianshangou Beds of Yixian Formation Locality: Chaomidianzi, Sihetun, Beipiao, Liaoning Province I believe this is a Dongbeititan dongi tooth as this tooth has the morphology of titanosauriform teeth, and Dongbeititan is the only titanosauriform from that locality as far as I know. The formation is based off the locality of Chaomidianzi (my source was confident of that locality
  19. I have here another Carcharodontosaurus. This one is just over 3". It appears free of repairs and restorations. Anyone see any red flags? Thank you, Bellamy
  20. ThePhysicist

    Ceratopsian spit tooth wear surface

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Commonly called "spit teeth," these teeth were shed by the animal after heavy usage. ^From "Wear biomechanics in the slicing dentition of the giant horned dinosaur Triceratops"
  21. ThePhysicist

    Ceratopsian spit tooth

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Commonly called "spit teeth," these teeth were shed by the animal after heavy usage. ^From "Wear biomechanics in the slicing dentition of the giant horned dinosaur Triceratops"
  22. Hi TFF, Would like for your advice on this spino tooth I saw online. Ive been looking at some of your old threads on how spino teeth have famously been repaired or restored. Ive been, in a way, sort of been able to detect whether they have been fixed up. this one however is labelled 100% natural and messaged the seller, he also confirmed nothing has been done on the tooth and its condition is how it was found straight from the ground. Size is 4 inches so quite nice and wanted to double check as most of his listings of this size have been also labelled repaired or restored. price i
  23. carch_23

    Pachy ungual claw?

    Hi all, would like to ask your opinions on these claws i purchased labelled as Pachycephalosaurus Foot claw (Juvenile) from Powder River Montana. Ive just seen some threads where some mistake Thesc claws with Pachy claws due to their similarities I guess. Just wanted to make sure or confirm the species of these little guys. Cheers!
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