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Found 13 results

  1. Ludwigia

    Garnierisphinctes sp. (Enay 1959)

    From the album: Late Jurassic Ammonites from Southern Germany

    ø 9cm. divisum zone Early Kimmeridgian Lacunosamergel Formation Lochen Subformation Sponge facies Found in the Upper Danube Valley
  2. Ludwigia

    Crussoliceras sp. (Enay 1959)

    From the album: Late Jurassic Ammonites from Southern Germany

    ø 25cm. divisum zone Early Kimmeridgian Lacunosamergel Formation, Lochen Subformation Sponge facies
  3. Ludwigia

    Crussoliceras crusoliense

    Calcite mold. Complete specimen. Only the apophyse is missing on this microconch. C. divisum is generally larger than C. crusoliense, which reaches an adult diameter of at the most 15 cm. The bipartite ribs crossing the venter continue mostly on until the end of the bodychamber and can become irregular, whereas by C. crusoliense they tend to merge towards the end and remain relatively constant.
  4. Limestone mold. Garnierisphinctes can be distinguished from Crussoliceras by its finer ribbing which continues farther along the whorls as by the latter. The rib-splitting over the venter is also more variable, particularly on the body chamber. This specimen is far from complete, but at least the first part of the body chamber is preserved.
  5. From the album: Late Jurassic Ammonites from Southern Germany

    15cm. Internal mold. Lower Kimmeridgian from the upper Danube valley.
  6. Limestone mold with phragmocone and part of the body chamber. The sutures are strongly pronounced on this specimen. The green color is the result of a fine layer of glauconite, an iron compound found often in sediments.
  7. Limestone mold. With Apophyse. Microconch to Taramelliceras trachinotum.
  8. Calcite mold with a fine residue of green glauconite on the phragmocone. This is the index fossil for the divisum zone. C. divisum is generally larger than C. crusoliense, which reaches an adult diameter of at the most 15 cm. The bipartite ribs crossing the venter continue mostly on until the end of the bodychamber and can become irregular, whereas by C. crusoliense they tend to merge towards the end and remain relatively constant.
  9. From the album: Late Jurassic Ammonites from Southern Germany

    From the Kimmeridgian divisum zone in the upper Danube Valley.
  10. Ludwigia

    Crussoliceras sp. (Enay 1959)

    From the album: Late Jurassic Ammonites from Southern Germany

    18cm. The other side of the previous one.
  11. I don't at all profess to be an expert at this. As a matter of fact, I've never done it before, but I've been thinking about trying this for quite a while. So this time when I visited my favorite site in the ditch at the side of the road in the Upper Danube Valley, I took along my camera, a pen and a few pieces of paper. I don't have a geologists compass and I forgot to bring along the measuring stick, so it was a pretty rudimentary first attempt. Starting at the base, I cleaned up the exposure where I'd previously been working over a stretch of about a meter's width and vertically up to the w
  12. Aptychi mostly existed as bilaterally symmetrical pairs and were part of the anatomy of many ammonites. They are believed to have been either a two-valved closing hatch at the aperture or else a double-plate jaw piece. This particular one is associated with the ammonite genus Taramelliceras.
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