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  1. Kikokuryu

    Tiny Judith River Theropod Teeth

    These teeth were sold as a baby tyrannosaurid and a dromaeosaurid/bird respectively. Some other specimens from this lot have been posted here if I recall. But they are from North of Havre, Montana close to the Canadian border. Apparently they are from quite an old collection from around 1950-70s. The provenance should place it solidly in Judith River Formation. Since these teeth were selling somewhat quickly, I just grabbed them and decided on figuring it out later. The first tyrannosaurid tooth does have some similarities to Dromaeosaurus with the mesial twist, but I could be wron
  2. ThePhysicist

    Paravians of Hell Creek

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    Even in the final years of the non-avian dinosaurs, the paravians remained diverse, with many species represented in the famed Hell Creek formation.
  3. This small tooth was found in powder county, it measures a little over half a inch and I wanted help with identification . Seller listed as either Nanotyrannus or Tyrannosaurus rex. I also think it’s most likely tyrannosaurid, and I wanted to know whether it’s tyrannosaurid and if it is whether it’s more likely to be Nanotyrannus or Tyrannosaurus rex. Im assuming it’s just a indeterminate tyrannosaurid because of the base damage and size, but please let me know you opinions.
  4. ThePhysicist

    Tyrannosaurid vs Dromaeosaurid

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    As a theropod tooth aficionado, I thought it useful to compare two families present in the Hell Creek Formation. They become increasingly difficult to distinguish as they get smaller, but this graphic presents some features which may be used to differentiate them on two similarly-sized exceptional specimens. Keep in mind there is some variability due to position, ontogeny, etc., so it's beneficial to study more than one tooth for each family.
  5. Hi TFF, I am a Dromaeosauridae enthusiast and have been collecting online for a little while now. I want to thank the members here for getting me educated on so many aspects of fossil teeth identification. I want to share my small collection in the hopes this is helpful for some of you in the future. Your critical input is highly appreciated, as always! #1 First up, one of my treasures, a robust Deinonychus antirrhopus tooth from the Cloverly Fm. A big thanks to @StevenJD for letting go of this one – much appreciated! Note the asymmetry in the placement of the carinae
  6. BirdsAreDinosaurs

    Kem Kem theropod tooth

    Hi all. Another Kem Kem tooth that I find hard to ID. I would say definitely not Abelisaurid. When comparing this tooth to the photo's in Troodons Kem Kem theropod topic I fine it hard to find a good match. The tooth is 3 cm long. Thanks again!
  7. Fast. Intelligent. Deadly. The "Raptor" is perhaps one of the most famous dinosaur today thanks to Jurassic Park. To many people's surprise however, raptors are heavily feathered and nimbler than movies would have you believe. The Jurassic Park Velociraptor was merely the size of coyote in real life! In fact, their proper family name is 'Dromaeosaurid'. The largest species was Utahraptor, and it grew to the size of a grizzly bear! Dromaeosaurid fossils have been found all over the world. They first appeared during the Cretaceous, though isolated teeth have been found in the mid-Jurassic. Allow
  8. BirdsAreDinosaurs

    Kem Kem Dromaeosaurid like tooth?

    Since I bought a couple of (very nice) Abelisaurid teeth from Kem Kem, which I initially thought where Dromaeosaurid, I am on the lookout for potential Dromaeosaurid teeth from Kem Kem. I think this tooth (1.9 cm) might be a candidate, but I have been wrong before. What are your thoughts? Should I ask for better pictures of the serrations or a serratiom count?
  9. BirdsAreDinosaurs

    Three small theropod teeth from Morocco

    I recently bought these three little teeth (between 1.7 and 2.0 cm long). They are from the Kem Kem Beds in Morocco. They were advertised as Dromaeosaurus teeth, but I know that is not very likely or well supported. I think the first two teeth might be Dromaeosaurid (mesial and distal serrations are different and the tip of the teeth extend past the base) and the third one might be Abelisaurid (distal side is almost straight). But I could very well be wrong, so I would like to hear your opinions. Thanks!
  10. ThePhysicist

    Acheroraptor tooth

    Identification A. temertyorum is characterized by the typical Dromaeosaurid traits (compressed, recurved, differing mc/dc serration densities), and longitudinal ridges/facets on the crown face. Notes This tooth was found this past Summer ('21), and in the same county as the holotype specimen.
  11. ThePhysicist

    Acheroraptor temertyorum

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Acheroraptor temertyorum Hell Creek Fm., Garfield Co., MT, USA Note the diagnostic ridges.
  12. ThePhysicist

    Dromaeosaurid Tooth

    Identification: This is a typical Dromaeosaurid tooth, with the serrations being differently-sized on each carina; the denticles are much smaller on the mesial carina compared to the distal carina. There's also slight recurvature, which is common in Dromaeosaurs. There are no other features present that allow for identification beyond Family. Described Dromaeosaurs in the Hell Creek Formation include Acheroraptor temertyorum and Dakotaraptor steini. Because both of their known dentitions are incomplete, this tooth may belong to either, or another undescribed Dromaeosaur. Identificati
  13. ThePhysicist

    Hell Creek Dromaeosaurid

    Hi y'all, I picked up this gorgeous Dromaeosaurid tooth. It was listed as Acheroraptor and I bought it thinking it was one. However, upon receiving it and taking some measurements, I believe it may be a candidate for Dakotaraptor steini, as it virtually matches one in @Troodon's collection in every metric. It has a semi-oval base, with no ridges or facets commonly seen on Acheroraptor. The mesial carina is straight, and terminates almost 1/3 the CH from the base. Dromaeosauridae Hell Creek Fm., Carter Co., MT, USA CH: ~ 10.5 mm CBL: ~ 6 mm CBW: 3 mm Mesial de
  14. Hi everyone. Tonight I'd Iike to share my most recent find: an absolutely tiny theropod tooth I found late at night sorting through what remains of the Aguja fm. matrix I purchased last year. I knew it would pay to be thorough and I was delighted to see the glint of enamel in a triangular shape eventually appear. Additionally, it has just taken the crown (no pun intended) for smallest theropod tooth in my collection, at only 2 mm in length and just over 1 mm in width. I'd be interested in reading your opinions on it's identity, I'm thinking either dromaeosaur or troodontid but I'm not sure.
  15. The first juvenile dromaeosaurid (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from Arctic Alaska is presented in this paper. Paper https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0235078 Article http://www.sci-news.com/paleontology/alaskan-saurornitholestine-dinosaur-08618.html Inreresting tooth
  16. A new domaeosaurid, Dineobellator notohesperus, consisting of a partial skeleton from the Upper Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) of New Mexico, the first diagnostic dromaeosaurid to be recovered from the latest Cretaceous of the southern United States. The holotype includes elements of the skull, axial, and appendicular skeleton. From the Ojo Alamo Formation Dineobellator notohesperus Article https://phys.org/news/2020-03-feathered-dinosaur-surviving-raptors.html Smithsonian Mag. Article https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/dineobellator-dinosaur-new-
  17. Hi all, I have been staring at this tooth for quite a while now with question marks in my head. It was found in the Bissekty Formation, Kyzylkum desert, Uzbekistan. It's 27mm long (1.01 inch) and properly labeled as Theropod indet. However, the seller raises the possibility of it being a Dromaeosaurid. Serrations do look different in length and width, a count on screen gives me distal 13/5mm and mesial 16/5mm. What throws me off is the rather 'stout' crown and round cross section, more Tyrannosaurid in my view. However, I have no reference images and the only publication I found (Sues and
  18. Here are some photos of some of my dromaeosaurid fossils from the Aguja Formation of Brewster County, Texas.
  19. Today is my last day off before I go back to work and I was supposed to spend the day making fossil starter kits. I have a cold though and I do not want the kids to think that 12 million year old shark teeth gave them a cold lol I am pretty bored so I thought I would post about our Judith River dinosaur fossils and how we are going to get discuss this formation. I am really surprised how much I am enjoying learning about these dinosaurs and this will be a formation that we spend a good bit of time on. It must have had some very productive ecosystems and there is a great diversity h
  20. fossilsonwheels

    HC Theropod tooth

    Listed on everybody's favorite auction site as a Dromaeosaur or Tyrannosaur tooth. 1/2" long theropod tooth. Hell Creek Frm, I believe it said South Dakota but I will double check that. It was very inexpensive so I went ahead and bought it. If nothing else, seems an excellent candidate for some analysis and it was a good way to test what I have learned without breaking the bank lol So lets see if I have gotten better at this. I believe it is Dromaeosaurid based on the difference in serration size and density. The seller posted good pictures so I could count the denticle
  21. Here is a really interesting bone. Despite being pretty small and a partial bone, this would be an excellent addition because you can get a great look inside of it. This is the type of bone that lends itself to some serious teaching I think. It is from Garfield County in Montana, Hell Creek Formation. 1 7/8" x 5/8" x 5/8". It is small and partial but it appears to be in excellent condition. It is listed as a raptor bone and my limited knowledge says that is a possibility. It sure looks like a theropod of some sort (bird, troodontid maybe I do not know). I would love to hear any and
  22. Hi all, I have a tricky tooth ID question. For now it is labeled as Theropod indet. and I guess this is as far as it gets, but I just want to check if someone else gets a Dromaeosaurid vibe =) It was found in the Lourinhã Formation. Crown height is 6mm. Denticles per 1mm are 9 mesial and 7 distal. Mesial denticles are also much shorter, and the mesial carina ends at about half way from the anterior of the tooth (maybe 2/3 considering the tip is missing). Distal denticles are slightly hooked towards the anterior. I went through quite some papers from similar aged formations in Portugal/Spa
  23. I recently added a Dromaeosaurid vertebra to our collection. I honestly did not bother with specs once I got it confirmed as Dromaeosaurid. I never asked size or what formation. I assumed it was from Judith River because it was sold as Dromaeosaurus. i knew it was going to be Dromaeosaurid indet so I was not worried about the specific ID. It is a raptor fossil so I wanted it. The vertebra arrived today and I got two very pleasant surprises. It is bigger than I thought. It is also not from Judith River or the species known from that formation. We got a Dromaeosaurid vertebra from th
  24. fossilsonwheels

    Judith River Dino Id Help

    All of these items are from the same dealer and I am looking for some ID help. I researched these as much as I could on my own but I can only get some far with the knowledge I have. All of these come from the Judith River formation. For our education programs to really be solid, we need to expand beyond just teeth. We do have an Edmontosaurus jaw fragment and will soon have some Ceratopsian frill pieces plus some bones fragments from the Morrison Formation. I think it would be a good idea to augment the small dromaeosaurid teeth we have a bone or two so I am trying to understand this part of d
  25. I was hoping somebody on TFF might be able to point me in the direction of any scientific papers, research or information that members here might have put together regarding dromaeosaurid theropods from the Judith River formation. This is not really about identifying any teeth, though I do have one from that formation. I am starting to do my research for the education program and am looking for scientific information. From what I can gather, there is a possible Saurornitholestes species and of course the dinosaur I have seen referred to as Julieraptor, which is a interesting story
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