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  1. Hello, several weeks ago, I presented a rudist recovery "operation" from the Afling-formation of the Gosau-group of Kainach (Upper Cretaceous): Well, the same day I have discovered the rudist zone featured above, I have also discovered a rudist zone about 100-200 m stratigraphically deeper. It is confined to an about 1 m thick, very dark limestone bed rich in various rudist and echinoid remains. The limestone belongs to the Geistthal-formation, considering the limestone is still located within the sequence with some red clastic rocks, suggesting strong terrestrial influence i
  2. Could not resist collecting some more Trochactaeon snails at Breitenbach-11 in Kainach, Styria, Austria last Saturday (10/10/2020). Especially the upper T-bed contains rather well preserved (for the formation, of course ) snails. But always the right amount of weathering is needed (not too much, leads to disintegration of snails; not to less, they will adhere firmly to the rock). Still some potential there. Worked only with a screwdriver, needed only a few very gentle hammer taps. No prepping, just a short brush with a soft tooth brush. For more info about the area, have a look at my
  3. From time to time, I would like to post specimens from the Campanian St. Bartholomä-formation in Styria, Austria, in this thread. For the first specimen, I was motivated by this thread: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/91459-is-this-a-rudist-fossil/ So the first specimen is a fragment of a large Vaccinites alpinus, with only two pillars - and not much else. Franz Bernhard
  4. Hello, some local Campanian news again... . First: The rudists from St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria, made into a local journal (pdf, in German): DieRudistenvonStBartholomae_Mineralog_2019.pdf Second: After this nice find at point 25-North from 09/24/2019: Point 25-North - 09/24/2019 I could not resist collecting this site systematically. 18 hours of work in October and November 2019 resulted in more than 100 fossils, which is a very good yield. For details see: Point 25-North - Four weeks (External site, in German, only a few pics). Th
  5. Waiting for Christkind and(!)/or(??) Santa Claus gives me some time putting together this question: The coral in question comes from the Styrian basin (Weißenegg-formation) and is Langhian/Miocene in age (ca. 15 Ma old). It comes from a very small road outcrop, mainly limestones, north of Heimschuh in the Sausal mountains, southern Styria, Austria. Beside massive, sturdy coral colonies like Montastrea, possibly Favites, etc., another colonial coral occurs in this outcrop, that disintegrates easily into individual sticks or pencils, aka corallites: Outcrop situation, fiel
  6. FranzBernhard

    400 Million years in 4 hours

    400 Million years in 4 hours The small-scale geology of Austria makes it possible to observe and collect invertebrate marine fossils from a time span of nearly 400 Million years (Ma) within a few hours and at a distance of only about 10 km: - 395 Ma old Devonian (Eifelian) corals - Ölberg - 80 Ma old Cretaceous (Campanian) rudists – St. Bartholomä - 12 Ma old Miocene (Serravallian/Sarmatian) gastropods - Waldhof I did this special hunting trip west of Graz at October 22, 2019 as a "feasibility study". The youngest and oldest fossils can simply be picked f
  7. Hello, today I had another opportunity to fossil hunt in St. Bartholomä. I tidied mostly up my main dig and collecting site in the quarry at Point 25 east of Kalchberg. As expected, I did not find much, only some small so-so specimens (19 specimens in 3 hours, but the majority would be rejects). However, in the same small quarry, a few meters to the north of the main dig site, "Knödelbrekzie" is also exposed (upper part of lower right pic), with some steep scree below. I have found two good rudists in this scree two years ago. Today, I dug again with bare hands in the scree. F
  8. Hello, this time, I will start with the end result : I am quite satisfied with the result ! The pillars are nicely preserved and the rudist is filled with sparry, white to orange calcite and contains some voids coated with tiny calcite crystals. The greenish batches consist also of calcite and are also well polished, but are finer grained and contain additionally some small quartz grains. These fillings may be related to the second filling event during redeposition of the rudists in this formation. For more info about that, see here: Some Rudists from St. Bartholomä T
  9. First of all: The book about the Coniacian-Santonian corals of Rußbach-Gosau, Austria, by Löser et al. (2019) is printed. It can be ordered at: http://www.korallen-kreide.de/index.html Its a must-have for all people interested in fossil corals! And: The abridged English version is also ready for download there! And now to my first application of this important milestone work: During my searching and digging at point 36 west of Kalchberg, St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria, at 07/04/2019, I found also a piece of limestone with small, regular voids/holes/tubes. Aft
  10. My hunting at point 25 east of Kalchberg at 05/16/2019 did not yield any good rudist. However, two coral colonies were found. Now I have a total of about 20 from this formation. This one is very small, poorly preserved and has a very, very low contrast (already strongly enhanced). It has some similarities to that one, but only remotely: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/87677-coral-3-from-the-campanian-st-bartholomä-formation-styria-austria-gosau-group-eastern-alps/ Corallites seems to have a diameter of about 1.2 mm. I do not expect any definitive answer , just sho
  11. The next two corals from St. Bartholomä... I collected this specimen nearly a year ago. Thought, it has some kind of borings. But I was a little bit confused, because most of the "borings" or tubes have a regular and tight, axial ornamentation. Polished cross sections revealed not much, but a few corallites (A, B, C). One of the tubes at the margin of the specimen shows some "shell" material with ornamentation on both sides (D). The left side is in contact with younger sediment, the right side with fossiliferous limestone. On the surface of the specimen, no shell material was observed wit
  12. This time a really odd ball from St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (West of Kalchberg, point 36). Collected 04/09/2019. Campanian St. Bartholomä-formation, Gosau group, Eastern Alps. The specimen was very dirty, thought it is just a round and smooth limestone piece, but haven´t found such a smooth piece there before, so I took it with me. After cleaning (but without any prep) and inspecting with a hand lens, I discovered, that the subglobular specimen of about 7 cm in size is covered over and over with tiny polygons, about 0.1-0.2 mm in size. So it is a fossil! But what? It
  13. Hello! Another colonial coral from St. Bartholomä. Contrast is poor and that´s the best I can to with my scrappy scrap. I think, I have not found such a coral before in this formation. And its the second largest colony I have found so far there. My guess is, that it could be Astraeofungia (g, h) or Dimorphastrea (a, b), all pics from Löser et al. (2015). But I am very probably wrong... Thank you very much for your help! Franz Bernhard
  14. Fossil hunting in the Santonian - lower Campanian Geistthal-formation of the Gosau basin of Kainach, Eastern Alps (Styria, Austria) As a whole, the Gosau basin of Kainach - St. Bartholomä is not very fossiliferous. In contrast to the St. Bartholomä-formation with its rudists etc., the other, much more extensive formations, especially the very extensive, somewhat tubititic Afling-formation, are generally very poor in fossils. Some are known, eg. ammonites, but their occurrences are rather elusive. One exception - or at least in part - are Trochactaeon snails. They are kn
  15. Chonetid impressions in slate (“Chonetenschiefer”) from the Plabutsch-formation, Palaeozoic of Graz, Styria, Austria (Devonian – Eifelian) The classic occurrence at Gaisbergsattel, west of Graz The Eifelian Plabutsch-formation – mostly fossiliferous limestones – of the Palaeozoic of Graz, Styria, Austria, contains locally beds of slates of various colors. Some of these beds contain abundant limonitic imprints of brachiopods and bivalves (“Chonetenschiefer”). The locality first mentioned in the literature (1871) is that at Gaisbergsattel west of Graz: Austrian map wi
  16. Supplementing the post in “Fossil Hunting Trips” about the Devonian Plabutsch-formation in Styria, Austria (with some background info): http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/90431-some-fossil-hunting-in-the-plabutsch-formation-of-the-palaeozoic-of-graz-styria-austria-devonian-–-eifelian/ I would like to post some more fossil specimens in this thread. More specimens will follow from time to time (hopefully). The first two specimens contain abundant branches of the tabulate coral Striatopora? suessi. Field pics of these specimens are already posted in the hunting t
  17. Hello, here is the next coral colony from the Campanian St. Bartholomä-formation in Styria, Austria (Gosau-group), collected 02/10/2019, west of Kalchberg, point 36. This coral colony is intergrown with limestone. There is a naturally weathered cross section and naturally weathered vertical section (but not much to see there). I have cut and polished one end and preservation seems to be not too bad. However, as usual, am rather clueless. I think, it has external pali, so it could belong to Hydnophoropsis? Many thanks for your help! Franz Bernhard
  18. Very small outcrops northwest of Graz are perhaps the richest site of Silurian fossils in Styria. There may be other sites with somewhat older macrofossils in Styria, but not as rich. The outcrops are part of the Palaeozoic of Graz, a thrust sheet within the Eastern Alps, composed or Silurian to Pennsylvanian sediments. It consists of three separate nappes, the outcrop and fossils presented here belong to the Eggenfeld-member of the Kötschberg-formation within the Rannach nappe. Geological map of Styria with the Palaeozoic of Graz situated north of Graz. The red X is the location o
  19. Hello, here I am again with a recently (10/14/2018) found coral colony from the Campanian St. Bartholomä-formation in Styria, Austria (Gosau-group). Its very poorly preserved and I have only very little hopes that it is possible to assign a genus to it. I don´t think its an Actinastrea, it seems more like a Barysmilia (according to Baron-Szabo, 2014), but I am really clueless. First pic is a polished part of the specimen. Preservation is very poor. Second pic is the "upper" surface, its strongly worn, only the position of the corallites can be seen, with some occasional septa. T
  20. FranzBernhard

    Vitta picta (Férussac, 1823)

    Second photo: About 50 individuals of the snail Vitta picta in different states of weathering, but most of them are still glossy and show their color patterns. The gloss is natural, no coating or something else applied, only washed. The color pattern is strongly variable between individuals. Note that also the outline is quite variable, which is typical for this species. Field of view is 40 mm, largest gastropod is about 6 mm high, so this snails are really small. This is a "multi-genus-species" and was/is assigned also to the following genera: Theodoxus, Agapilia, Clithon, Nerita, Neritina. A
  21. FranzBernhard

    Xenophora deshayesi (Michelotti, 1847)

    Carrier shell Xenophora deshayesi. This gastropod was a shell collector, having one of his collected items still attached (an olive snail, Olivella clavula (Lamarck, 1810)). The locations of the other shells or shell fragments are still visible. The specimen was found in two pieces and then glued back together Shell collector? A friend found another one in this outcrop that collected only small quartz pebbles - obviously a mineral collector! Exact locality is Höllerkogel-18 in my own documentation. It is a tiny outcrop (about 1-2 square meters) in a densely wooded, very
  22. Hello, some of you may have noticed my rudist posts from the Gosau basin of Kainach - St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria. Beside rudists, there are also other fossils, but they are much rarer. During my hunting trips in the Campanian St. Bartholomä formation, I have found ca. 300 rudist specimens (hippuritidae and radiolitidae), but only 12 coral colonies, including two imprints, and no individual coral. I would like to show you one of these coral colonies and would like to ask you for your opinion. I will start with the simplest one. In the literature, only one coral species is de
  23. FranzBernhard

    Hippurites nabresinensis Futterer 1893

    Apical view of a polished cross section of the right (lower) valve of Hippurites nabresinensis from the St. Bartholomä-Formation of the Gosau basin of Kainach - St. Bartholomä in western Styria, Austria. This species has no L-pillar, the P1-pillar is at ca. 3:00, the P2-pillar at ca. 5:00. The hump at ca. 8:00 is a growth anomaly. At ca. 11:00 and 1:00, the position of both teeth sockets is visible (a hypothetical L-pillar would be between them, see the specimen of H. colliciatus), at ca. 2:00 the position of the posterior muscle. At the upper left, it is intergrown with the fragment of anothe
  24. FranzBernhard

    Hippurites colliciatus Woodward, 1855

    Apical view of a polished cross section of a pseudocolonie of three indivuals of Hippurites colliciatus from the St. Bartholomä-Formation of the Gosau basin of Kainach - St. Bartholomä in western Styria, Austria. The pillars (L, P1, P2) are indicated, the L-Piller of this species is only a small hump. Left and right of L, the position of both teeth sockets is visible, left of P1 also the position of the posterior muscle. For specimens like this, the name H. exaratus was also in use. The specimen is from a small scree in a small, abandoned marl quarry, located in the eastern part of K
  25. FranzBernhard

    Athleta rarispina (Lamarck, 1811)

    Volute snail Athleta rarispina on matrix. Note the very well preserved borings of an unknown organism. Exact locality is Höllerkogel-18 in my own documentation. It is a tiny outcrop (about 1-2 square meters) in a densely wooded, very steep area southwest of St. Josef, Styria, Austria. This small outcrop, composed of a medium grained, quartz-rich, somewhat limonitic sand yielded, from November 2016 to May 2018, at least 80 species of gastropods and bivalves and is far from exhausted. Most of the fossils are characterized by a partial limonitic staining and usually a very good preservation. The
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