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  1. This fossil was found by a friend near Falls of the Ohio, so presumably Middle Devonian but who knows. The hollow elements are straight, with angular cross-sections, and seem to be organized in alternating orientations. Any and all insights appreciated. The coin is an American quarter dollar, about an inch (24.26 mm) in diameter.
  2. Hey guys, I‘ve dug out some ’fossils‘ that I can't say for sure on a hill of Hubei Province,China. According to the local geological document,there’re exposed strata of middle Devonian and lower Permian around this area. There are some rocks with special patterns on it, which looks like trilobite and shellfish. On another rock, I can see a patch of dots, just like a tentacle of starfish. On this hillside, I also found some strange rocks in the shape of ’flat cylinder‘, with irregular patterns on them. I think it may be the remains of some kind of ancient creature.
  3. Hi everyone, Sorry if this is a bit of a basic question, but I'm fairly new at this and seem to be finding conflicting information about what I'm looking for. I recently found a number of fossil urchins, and what I think look like will probably turn out to be shells enclosed in sandstone on a beach. Some are pretty clean and only have a small amount of sandstone adhering to them, but others are almost completely buried in the piece of rock with only little bits of the fossil exposed. I was wondering what the best way to remove the rock is without damaging the fossil? I've tried soaki
  4. Saturday dawned a bit chilly, but the sun peeped out from lingering clouds to brighten a stellar day of fossil prospecting in the Ordovician bedrock of central Pennsylvania. We strolled along the limestone ground, like beachcombers peering in shallow shore waters, when my relatively newbie friend exclaimed, "That looks like a starfish!" Bingo...Indeed it was an Asteroidea. I'm guessing it's genus Urasterella, and I wonder how rare is this find. The specimen's longest ray is 1.75 inches (4.45 cm). Photos are the rock slab and a closeup of the mostly complete starfish, as f
  5. Hello, Last saturday I had a trek in a mountain area in the northen Italy alps and I found this fossil (I'm not actaully 100% sure that it's a fossil, but I don't know what else could it be). It looks like an echinoderm fossil to me, but I'd like to ask your opinion about it. Thanks a lot, have a nice day. Oz
  6. I_gotta_rock

    Tiny Sea Urchin

    From the album: Delaware Fossils

    So sweet! This is a very rare Cretaceous echinoid (sea urchin), Boletechinus. They are typically no more than a couple mm in diameter. This one is shown next to a pencil eraser. Most of the ones in the Smithsonian's collection come from sand and silt removed for the creation and maintenance of a canal, which exposed fossils well below the surface. This one comes from New Castle County, Delaware.
  7. Last month my dad and I took a four-day weekend trip to Western New York to visit some new fossil sites and to collect in the famous Beecher's Trilobite Beds. We had only once before been out to Western New York to collect fossils - a visit to Penn Dixie Fossil Park - so this time around we wanted to try out some different places that we had never collected in before. The trip was a lot of fun and I enjoyed putting my research skills to work in finding new places to visit. I greatly expanded my collection of Silurian and Devonian fossils and found quite a few things on my fossil bucket list. I
  8. For the Columbus Day weekend my girlfriend planned a three-day trip down to Southwestern Virginia as a birthday present to me. The plan was to do a little sightseeing, go on some hikes, enjoy the fall foliage, and, most importantly, collect some fossils. Unfortunately Hurricane Delta had other plans for us. As the weekend approached it looked like the entire weekend would be soaked with rain. We tried to change our reservations, but we were not allowed to postpone. Not knowing what to expect for the weekend, we made our trip. Sunday was to be my big day of fossil collecting. It was also the da
  9. FossilNerd

    The Day of The Echinoderm

    Firstly, a big THANK YOU to @Jeffrey P for hanging out with me for the day! What a knowledgeable, generous, and all around swell guy! If you ever get the opportunity to hunt with Jeff, I highly encourage you to. Jeff and I met at around 8:30 am, and after a quick transfer of his gear to my truck, we were off. We first drove about 45 minutes south to the small town of Wax, to hunt the Upper Mississippian. Specifically to look for blastoids and crinoid calyxes that were known to be found in the area. As it happens, luck was with us! Unfortunately, I didn't take the fiel
  10. Opabinia Blues

    Brittle star real or forgery?

    Hello! This is an apparent “fossil” brittle star, looking much like those that come from the Ordovician of Morocco. However, these particular fossils are very often faked, and I have a strong gut feeling that this particular one has been carved into the matrix. What does everyone else think? For whatever reason that I can’t quantify this piece *looks* like a fake to me, especially due to the fact that it has a very distinctive obvious outline from an air tool, which often is a sign of carving, though that I’ve also often seen that done with genuine Knightia and such.
  11. MrBones

    Echinoid prep

    Hello, I believe that this is a fossilized sea urchin, it might not look so, but I do see a resemblance. It appears to be made out of gypsum, or another soft crystal. I was wondering If iy would be wise to dip it in vinigar. Would you be able to see some more details? Or will the wjole thing just dissolve?
  12. UndercoverN

    Definitely Agatized......Echinoderm?

    Well, as you maybe can see it is agatized and you can see right down to its larger cells . Is this a part of an echinoderm? Thanks
  13. Bonehunter

    blastoid, echinoderm?

    Found this in a gravel bar when I was a kid in south St. Louis county. One of my favorites simply due to the complexity, the impression, and the "remnant piece". Not sure how to differentiate pentremite from blastoid other than the narrow suture lines/rays? Thoughts welcomed! Bone
  14. Utera

    Starfish

    I got this fossil at an antique shop a while back and I believe they told me it was from Morocco. other than that I have no other information. Is there any way you guys could help me?
  15. Utera

    Sea Biscuit

    I bought this at a fossil and rock show at my local state fair, I did not get any identification on it besides "Sea Biscuit". Can anyone help me?
  16. Antonjo

    Echinoid ID

    Found recently in Split, Croatia, near Adriatic sea, on hill called Marjan Location If someone can tell the species? Thanks
  17. I have been fortunate to hunt Mazon Creek fossils for nearly 40 years. I have collected Many tens of thousands of concretions. I have also purchased premium specimens from other collectors. In the past, I have posted many of these specimens on the forum. I have decided to start posting more in depth descriptions of some of the amazing animals that can be found in the MC deposit. All specimens that I will post are from my personal collection. The first animal that I will highlight is the holothurian or sea cucumber Achistrum sp. Sea cucumbers are a common animal in toda
  18. An acquaintance of mine bought this at the Tucson gem and mineral show two years ago. He is now interested in selling and I am interested in buying. The price seems fair but of course the big question....is it real? I may add is it all real, is it a composite of different pieces, or is it a fabrication/replica? The whole piece is close to 15 inches at the tallest point, and close to 13 inches at the widest point. Thank you for your help.
  19. I am hoping someone on the forum is familiar with Ordovician carpoids. i collected this specimen at a roadcut in Claremont Ohio. it is from the Maquoketa Formation. Any information on what species it might be would be greatly appreciated.
  20. Monica

    Hungry Hollow echinoderm

    Hello there! This past Saturday, I went on a "field trip" to Hungry Hollow near Arkona, Ontario (mid-Devonian in age), and I found one weird item. It's an echinoderm of some sort, but which sort? A crinoid holdfast? Something else? Please see the photos below and let me know what you think. (By the way - I didn't make it home from work in time to take photos in natural light today, so I apologize for the fairly poor photo quality - if it's sunny tomorrow I can get better pictures then. And I also apologize for my blue finger in the photos - my students and I were looking at c
  21. Hi all, It's been a while since I posted a trip report but I was feeling like posting last evening as well as testing out my new photography rig. I moved houses two years ago and lost my lovely brick wall backdrop (the exterior of back of the house) which allowed photography in natural light. The new house is all vinyl siding outside and I have more shade so less opportunity for good sunlit pictures. However, one corner inside the house has a bricked area where a wood burning stove used to be so I have decided to set up some lights there. The pics came out
  22. JUAN EMMANUEL

    Camptostroma roddyi

    From the album: Echinoderm Collection

    Camptostroma roddyi (Hundt, 1939). Kinzer formation, Bonnia-Olenellus Zone, early Cambrian. Found in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, US. Bought as Ebay purchase. This animal is about 4cm in diametre. An early Cambrian echinoderm that is called a stem echinoderm as it is said that many types of echinoderms arose from this animal. This species is the only animal in the family of its own, Camptostromatoidea.
  23. JUAN EMMANUEL

    Belochthus orthokolus

    From the album: Echinoderm Collection

    Belochthus orthokolus (Bell, 1976). Found in the Verulam formation, Gamebridge, Ontario, Canada. Middle Ordovician. Obtained online as a purchase. The edrio is about 1.8 cm long.
  24. pjullien

    Echinoderm??

    I have found 2 invertebrate fossils that I haven't found before. They appear to be five-sided and one shows a star fish pattern on the top. The bottoms are curved and smooth. The dimensions are about 0.5 cm in diameter and 1 to 2 mm in thickness. Any help in identifying would be greatly appreciated as usual. (The rocks from the lake are from the Pennsylvanian period). Are they a type of echinoderm? The shape and characteristics of the underside seem a bit odd-could it be a central part of an echinoderm? Another question that comes to mind is why are they so similar yet one lacks the five
  25. sloth

    Burrowing echinoderm?

    From the album: Macro Florida Fossils

    I found this whale vertebrae with a lot of burrowing damage. I'm not sure if these pebbles I found inside are rocks or echinoderms.
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