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Found 445 results

  1. Euphemites gastropod.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Euphemites gastropod SITE LOCATION: Stephens County, Texas, USA TIME PERIOD: Pennsylvanian Period (299-323 Million Years ago) Data: Euphemites, extinct genus of gastropods (snails) abundant during the Late Carboniferous Period (between 320 and 286 million years ago) in the shallow seas that covered the midcontinental region of North America. Euphemites was a small, globular snail with a broad and arcuate (bow-shaped) aperture. Ornamentation consists of parallel ridges separated by troughs following the plane of coiling. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Gastropoda Order: †Bellerophontida Family: †Euphemitidae Genus: †Euphemites
  2. Strombus alatus Gastropod fossil.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Strombus alatus Gastropod fossil Caloosahatchee Formation, Sarasota, Florida, USA TIME PERIOD: Pliocene Era (5.333 million to 2.58 million years) Strombus alatus, common name the "Florida fighting conch" is a species of medium-sized warm-water sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Strombidae, the true conchs. The shell can be as large as 112 millimetres (4.4 in). Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Gastropoda Order: Littorinimorpha Family: Strombidae Genus: Strombus Species: alatus
  3. Gastropod Fossils Morocco.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Gastropod Fossils Boujdour, Western Sahara, Morocco Cretacious Period - 100 million years old The Gastropoda or gastropods, more commonly known as snails and slugs, are a large taxonomic class within the phylum Mollusca. The class Gastropoda includes snails and slugs of all kinds and all sizes from microscopic to Achatina achatina, the largest known land gastropod. There are many thousands of species of sea snails and sea slugs, as well as freshwater snails, freshwater limpets, land snails and land slugs. The class Gastropoda contains a vast total of named species, second only to the insects in overall number. The fossil history of this class goes back to the Late Cambrian. There are 611 families of gastropods known, of which 202 are extinct and appear only in the fossil record. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Gastropoda Order: Murchisoniina Family: Phanerotrematidae
  4. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Gastropod - Euomphalus planidorsatus Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 years old) Euomphalus is a genus of fossil marine gastropods known to have lived from the Silurian to the Middle Permian. Euomphalus is characterized by a closely coiled shell with a depressed to slightly elevated spire and a channel-bearing angulation (a selenizone) on the upper surface of the whorls. The lower surface of the whorls is rounded to angular. Amphiscapha, Philoxene, and Straparollus are among similar related genera. Serpulospira, also related, differs in having a broadly open spiral in the adult form. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Gastropoda Order: Euomphaloidea Family: Euomphalidae Genus: †Euomphalus Species: †planidorsatus
  5. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Gastropod - Euomphalus planidorsatus Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 years old) Euomphalus is a genus of fossil marine gastropods known to have lived from the Silurian to the Middle Permian. Euomphalus is characterized by a closely coiled shell with a depressed to slightly elevated spire and a channel-bearing angulation (a selenizone) on the upper surface of the whorls. The lower surface of the whorls is rounded to angular. Amphiscapha, Philoxene, and Straparollus are among similar related genera. Serpulospira, also related, differs in having a broadly open spiral in the adult form. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Gastropoda Order: Euomphaloidea Family: Euomphalidae Genus: †Euomphalus Species: †planidorsatus
  6. Fossil Snail Sea Shell Turritella.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Fossil Snail Sea Shell Turritella plebia St. Mary's formation, in the Calvert Cliffs, of Calvert County, Maryland Miocene Period, 23 million years ago Turritella is a genus of medium-sized sea snails with an operculum, marine gastropod mollusks in the family Turritellidae. They have tightly coiled shells, whose overall shape is basically that of an elongated cone. The name Turritella comes from the Latin word turritus meaning "turreted" or "towered" and the diminutive suffix -ella. The Gastropoda or gastropods, more commonly known as snails and slugs, are a large taxonomic class within the phylum Mollusca. The class Gastropoda includes snails and slugs of all kinds and all sizes from microscopic to Achatina achatina, the largest known land gastropod. There are many thousands of species of sea snails and sea slugs, as well as freshwater snails, freshwater limpets, land snails and land slugs. The class Gastropoda contains a vast total of named species, second only to the insects in overall number. The fossil history of this class goes back to the Late Cambrian. There are 611 families of gastropods known, of which 202 are extinct and appear only in the fossil record. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Gastropoda Order: Sorbeoconcha Family: Turritellidae Genus: Turritella Species: plebia
  7. Gastropod Glabrocinculum fossil.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Gastropod Glabrocingulum fossil Finis Shale Formation in Jack County, Texas, USA Pennsylvanian Period, 312 million years ago The Gastropoda or gastropods, more commonly known as snails and slugs, are a large taxonomic class within the phylum Mollusca. The class Gastropoda includes snails and slugs of all kinds and all sizes from microscopic to Achatina achatina, the largest known land gastropod. There are many thousands of species of sea snails and sea slugs, as well as freshwater snails, freshwater limpets, land snails and land slugs. The class Gastropoda contains a vast total of named species, second only to the insects in overall number. The fossil history of this class goes back to the Late Cambrian. There are 611 families of gastropods known, of which 202 are extinct and appear only in the fossil record. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Gastropoda Order: †Pleurotomariida Family: †Gosseletinidae Genus: †Glabrocingulum Species: †grayvillense
  8. Calliostoma wilcoxiana

    A very nice little gastropod. The marl pit this came out of produces very well preserved gastropods and bivalves. An uncommon find, but not rare.
  9. Being a newbie to fossil collecting, I usually go to the same creek on mount Carmel (Israel), which is a 10 minute drive from where I live. This time I tried another location, less than 2 km away from my “usual” spot, and to my surprise, although I couldn’t find any of the specimens I usually do (which are mainly ammonites) - I did find 3 pretty large fossils of another type of sea snail, which I’m not familiar with… I’ve attached pictures of 2 of them (those that were in a better condition) and also a picture with a scale to better present their size… Could anyone help me identify them? Thank you! :-)
  10. I spent the morning screening in the Post Oak Creek of Sherman, Texas today. I found lots of small shark teeth...all different types. Tooth enamel from Mastodon/Mammoth and bits and pieces.
  11. Portuguese gastropods ID needed

    Hello guys. These gigantic gastropods (?) were found 30 years ago near Lisbon. In a dry river. Not too much geological information to provide. The green mineral was found adjacent to the specimens. The three specimens where meters apart ones from the others. They have a brown/orange/white mineral associated in some parts. Can anyone help with the ID, please? Thanks in advance, Miguel P.S.: the Calymenid is just part of the same collection and it is, of course, from Morocco. No relation with the other fossils.
  12. Here is a very nice little gastropod fossil I found in a creek about 10 miles east of Dallas recently. Once I washed it off well I was shocked by the detail, and even colored stripes! Can anybody give me more info on this? I will post it to the Gallery with more info. Is it very common to see color in fossilized gastropods? Thanks again! KP
  13. Turret Shell

    Collected from matrix that washed into the Chesapeak Bay by landslide. Donated to the Delaware Museum of Natural History.
  14. Snail

    This piece was excavated out of a block of matrix deposited in the Chesapeake Bay by a landslide. It was donated to the Delaware Museum of Natural History.
  15. Snail

    This piece was excavated out of a block of matrix deposited in the Chesapeake Bay by a landslide. This specimen was donated to the Delaware Museum of Natural History.
  16. Snail

    Collected from matrix in the Chesapeake Bay that was deposited by landslide. Donated to the Delaware Museum of Natural History.
  17. It was a beautiful day at the North Sulphur River in Ladonia, Texas. The river is nearly dry, so visibility was really good for searching. I sifted around the puddles and gravel bars and I found several pieces of baculite, a small gastropod (I love those), and a small piece of tooth enamel (mastodon I believe?) I always love finding that... even if it’s a small piece!
  18. IMG_0034.JPG

    From the album Gastropods

    One big Polonicies lewesi. (spelling?) This big beaut was found at Scotia Sandstone Formation in Northern California and is Pliocene in age.
  19. Sulcos001C.JPG

    From the album Gastropods

    My best ever of one of these known as Neptunia (sulcosipho) tabulata, found in the Scotia Sandstone Formation in Northern California and Pliocene in age. This is a really big one and quite rare!!
  20. tab 4E.JPG

    From the album Gastropods

    Here is a rather rare and very nice gastropod known as Neptunia (sulcosipho) tabulata found in the Scotia Sandstone Formation and Pliocene in age. A really nice specimen.
  21. gastro 005.jpg

    From the album Gastropods

    Here is a gastropod known as Neptunia smernia. Found in the Scotia Sandstone Formation and Pliocene in age. I really like the fish verts with this specimen! A rather rare gastropod!
  22. Ficus papyratia

    Self collected from a bucket of matrix brought home from a marl / shell pit in Columbus County NC. A very nice specimen.
  23. Moon Snail NSR

    From the album North Sulphur River

  24. Gastropod from France

    Hi all, Anyone know what species/genus this gastropod is? It's from Rivière-sur-Tarn, a location in France that yields fossils from the Toarcian stage of the early Jurassic (approx 180 mya). Best regards, Max
  25. Ichnofossil

    From the album Collection

    © fruitoftheZOOM

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