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  1. Hi all! I ventured out to Mimico Creek in Toronto, Ontario today to look for fossils. It was very cold and the rocks were frozen together, but I managed to pry out one large rock that has some interesting fossils on it. The fossils are from the Georgian Bay Formation (Upper Ordovician). The rock caught my eye because I could spot a few Cornulites flexuosus on one side, but after I brought it home and washed it, I was pleasantly surprised to find that the other side had even more interesting items on it! I'm not exactly sure of what I'm looking at, though, so I'm asking for your
  2. Hello! It was found in the Georgian Bay Formation - Ordovician period, in West Toronto. It was found after cracking some rocks on the riverbanks of Etobicoke creek. I recently came across a rather peculiar fossil, I initially though it might have been an ammonite, but those didn't exist until much later than the Ordovician period. It seems to be slightly ribbed, with a bit of a spine.
  3. Had fun kicking around. Found usual stuff. Cleaned dirt off it and enjoy looking at all the fossilized creatures.
  4. Hello again! Sorry for the constant posts, but I've been finding a lot of amazing stuff recently! Anyways, as the title says, this was probably one of my best hauls ever for a single day! I managed to find over a dozen different nautiloid chunks and was able to extract toooooons of super well defined and complete brachiopods from a matrix piece!! This will be another 3 part post as i have lots of pictures: Here was the full haul for the day, with ruler for reference (notches in cm). Here are some alternate angles of the nautiloids. I going to assume/believe t
  5. JUAN EMMANUEL

    Treptoceras crebiseptum orthocones

    From the album: Urban Fossils of Toronto (Georgian Bay Formation, Lower Member)

    Treptoceras crebiseptum specimens. The one on the left comes from Mimico creek. The blue grey one on the right is covered with bryozoans and comes from the Humber river area and is complete is actually missing the living chamber. Both belong to the Georgian Bay Formation.

    © (©)

  6. Emthegem

    Another classic trip

    Another decent haul over the last few days. Bunch of nautiloids and whatnot, a couple mussels. These were my favourites from the last 2 days in the river. This was a biiiiig nautiloid, and after cleaning it I realized there were two of them! wowowowo! (Sorry the picture didn't turn out quite that nice) This is probably one of my highest quality specimen so far, although it did break near the end when extracting it from the matrix.
  7. Wowowow I was very surprised to find all this amazing stuff today at my favourite river bank fossils spot of the Etobicoke creek. I managed to snag a whole lot of stuff today, some Orthoconic Nautiloids, Brachipods and what I believe to be the nicest tentaculite I've ever seen!!! The fossils are from the Georgian Bay Formation and they were found in the broken up "rock fields" next to the creek. This is going to be one of my longer posts, so I will have to split them up into section. The full haul, with the typical estwing 22 ounce rock pick (33 cm from bottom of the han
  8. I had a disappointing outing to Joshua Creek looking for lamp shells on the weekend. When I got home, I saw one of the rocks had a wonderfully detailed critter on the side...I was very pleased. I suppose it is some kind of encrusting bryozoan. Most that I find are branching types with smooth surfaces and little evidence of the apertures for living inhabitants.
  9. Hello there! I took advantage of the nice weather we've been having to visit Mimico Creek in Toronto, Ontario (Georgian Bay Formation, Upper Ordovician) yesterday afternoon. Here are some photos of specimens that I'd like help identifying - perhaps @Tidgy's Dad would like to have a look? Firstly - the whole rock which contains the bryozoans and the unknown black objects: Specimen #1: a nice branching bryozoan - perhaps Homotrypa? Specimen #2: a nice encrusting bryozoan (there are actually two of them) - perhaps Mesotrypa?
  10. Hello, I recently cracked open a rock to find one the most pristine and unusually shaped fossils I've seen in a looong time. I predict it might be the edge of a bivalve shell poking out, but I wanted to know what others might have to say about this. It was found in the rock deposits of the rivers in Toronto, Canada, and is part of the Georgian bay formation. Also, only the bottom half seems to be completely crystallized and is translucent, whereas the top is relatively opaque: I am somewhat worried about totally ruining the fossil if I try to further crack
  11. JUAN EMMANUEL

    Favistina calicina

    From the album: Credit River Fossils from Streetsville, Ontario (Georgian Bay Formation, Upper Member)

    Favistina calicina (AKA Favistella alveolata) (Nicholson, 1875). Late Ordovician, Katian. Georgian Bay Formation, Upper Member. Credit River, Streetsville, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada. Found as a loose specimen on an exposure along the Credit River. Set on fossiliferous limestone.
  12. JUAN EMMANUEL

    Treptoceras crebiseptum

    From the album: Urban Fossils of Toronto (Georgian Bay Formation, Lower Member)

    The smallest complete Treptoceras crebiseptum specimen in my collection. It even has the body chamber. Length is 10 cm long. Found in the shales of the Georgian Bay formation, Lower Member at Mimico Creek in Etobicoke, Ontario, Canada. Late Ordovician.
  13. JUAN EMMANUEL

    Ichnofossil Association

    From the album: Urban Fossils of Toronto (Georgian Bay Formation, Lower Member)

    Ichnofossil association collected somewhere along the Humber River. Georgian Bay formation, Lower Member. Late Ordovician. Etobicoke, Ontario, Canada.
  14. Monica

    scolecodont or conodont?

    Hi again! Over the weekend, I posted pictures of small fossils in a rock I found at Mimico Creek in Toronto, Ontario (Georgian Bay Formation, Upper Ordovician). I've created this new post just for the shiny black specimens that I found in the rock because a consensus wasn't reached regarding their identity. Each of the two specimens pictured below are 5mm long. My question is: are these items scolecodonts or conodonts? I was leaning towards scolecodonts but I wanted to see what others have to say... Thanks once again! Monica
  15. JUAN EMMANUEL

    Complete Treptoceras crebiseptum

    From the album: Urban Fossils of Toronto (Georgian Bay Formation, Lower Member)

    Complete specimen of a late Ordovician cephalopod Treptoceras crebiseptum, even with the living chamber intact. The length is appr. 37 cm. From the Mimico creek, Georgian Bay formation, Ontario. Specimen found in shale and my first complete one!! I usually find small fragments of the phragmocone at Mimico creek. Also keep in mind specimens found in shale are preserved squashed, compared to the ones preserved in limestone they are preserved in their original shape.

    © (©)

  16. Hello there! Last month, I visited the Credit River in Mississauga, Ontario, Canada (Georgian Bay Formation, Upper Ordovician) to look for some fossilized corals. In addition to a bunch of weathered colonial rugose corals, I found an item that I think is something, but I'm not sure what - perhaps a sponge? Here are some photos of it: Side view - dry: Top view - dry: Top view - wet: Thanks so much! Monica
  17. I found this in ordovician strata that is approximately 450 million years old. It looks like a shell fragment from a bivalve or brachiopod, but it has rounded edges. Any help would be appreciated.
  18. Hello everyone! Now that I've started to split some rocks from my local creeks (Mimico Creek and Etobicoke Creek, Georgian Bay Formation, Upper Ordovician), I'd like some help to identify what I've found. @JUAN EMMANUEL, can you help? Rock #1: This type of bivalve is very common, but I can't decide if it's Ambonychia sp. or Byssonychia sp. The book I have says that they both occur in the Georgian Bay Formation, and they look very similar except Byssonychia sp. "has strong radiating ribs rather than (fine radiating) striae," which is what Ambonychia sp. has. (Hessin, p.
  19. fossilzz

    Isotelus Pygdium

    From the album: Finds From the Ordovician -488 to 443 MYA-

    From the Georgian Bay Formation
  20. Yesterday I visited Etobicoke creek (west end of Toronto) which exposes the ordovician Georgian Bay formation. The creek was abundant with trace fossils and plates of preserved ripples, as well as small orthocone nautiloids.
  21. Hello there! I was inspired by @markjw to check out the Credit River here in Mississauga, Ontario (Georgian Bay Formation, Upper Ordovician) because where I normally hunt there are typically no corals and I'd love to add a couple to my collection. Consequently, I went out for about an hour this morning before the family got up in order to try my luck, and I'm happy to say that I was successful!!! Based on information provided by @FossilDAWG in other threads here on TFF, I think all of my colonial rugose corals are Favistina calcina - here are photos of three of my spec
  22. Monica

    Graptolite from Mimico Creek?

    Hello there! Well, I tried to take Viola out for a little fossil hunt by Mimico Creek in Etobicoke, Ontario (Georgian Bay Formation, Upper Ordovician) this afternoon because when I checked the forecast this morning it looked like it was going to be ideal fossil-hunting weather - a mix of sun and cloud with temperatures in the mid-20s Celsius. When we arrived, however, it began to rain - we toughed it out and came away with one piece before it began to pour and we called it a day. I was disappointed since I was hoping to spend a few hours there, but the one piece we took home look
  23. If I had 2 weeks of vacation, I still wouldn't be able to catch up with cleaning, identifying, sketching, photographing, and organizing the recent minor finds.
  24. JUAN EMMANUEL

    Toronto Nautiloid

    Treptoceras crebiseptum (Hall, 1847). A nautiloid found in the shale of the Georgian Bay Formation, lower informal member, at a shale wall. Locality is Mimico Creek, Etobicoke, Ontario, Canada. I have included in situ pics to show the process of collecting the specimen. The length of the orthocone is approximately 40 cm which is the size of an adult Treptoceras crebiseptum.
  25. Hello everyone! On Monday, I found a beautiful Treptoceras crebriseptum orthoconic nautiloid in a huge rock at Mimico Creek in the Etobicoke/Toronto area (Georgian Bay Formation, Upper Ordovician). It has been suggested that I might have a complete specimen, so I was hoping that someone out there might be able to let me know if this is the case or not. Here are some pictures... Whole specimen: Close-up of the base of the specimen (specimen has been turned over) - note that it is smoothly rounded and shows no septa - is this the fossilized
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