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  1. I am going to start adding some images of my favorite finds which I call Collection Pieces. Identifications range from maybe, probably to most likely. I've only started to seriously collect over the past year. I've spent a great deal of time studying and learning Geology, as a hobby. I am located in Western Pennsylvania. At first, a map of the area. Anything in bright yellow is the Glenshaw Formation. The Ames Limestone layer exists between the Glenshaw and the Casselman Formations, which is the Orange color on the map. I have yet to explore the Ames Limestone, so I've only found f
  2. I’ve been to an outcrop on a cut highway ramp three times over the past three days. First two times I gathered rocks and broke them up at home. This time I stuck around and searched. This outcrop has a prominent exposure of the Pine Creek limestone. In the shale immediately above that, I found my first fossilized plant/tree tap root. 13oz Estwing pick for scale. I was able to recover it. It’s about 12 pieces. The top portion has a quartz looking center. I plan on taking some photos and then trying to piece it back together with some paraloid.
  3. Petalodus12

    My Best Carboniferous Finds

    Hi all, I’ve posted a few topics on the forum but have yet to show my entire collection, or my best finds. So here goes. A little background on me. I’ve been fossil hunting since I was very young, probably since I was 4 when I found a plant fossil in my backyard. Over the past few years as I have ventured into adulthood I have gotten very interested in the fossils of the Pittsburgh area. I will display my best finds here and periodically update the thread with new finds. As a note, many of the vertebrate fossils I have found are rare and may be important to science. I have been in contact
  4. cngodles

    Limestone Split

    Split the limestone, and when tying to cleave down the rock, split the fossil. Lucky for me, it split in between the inside and outside shell. Going to glue it back together with paraloid. Highly probable Metacoceras.
  5. cngodles

    Pentagon shaped piece

    When cleaning up rocks I brought home today, I found this little piece that I didn't originally target. It's pentagon shape makes me believe it's for sure a fossil. I've never found anything like it, so I feel like I'm about to get an education here. Perhaps part of a crinoid? Whatever it is, I don't have the experience, yet. Also noticed the indented hole on the top. Maybe part of it, maybe not. It's way too centered I think to not be part of it. Underside. It is convex with a small raised ridge along the edge. Sideways view of the
  6. Found this small oddity while breaking apart limestone. The pitted appearance was interesting. The pits also seem to extend the whole way through. They also appear to wrap at a 90 degree angle on the side that isn't broken. The broken side reveals how they go through. I chipped away a little at the matrix, but didn't go too tough to keep from breaking it. Whole specimen with scale: (stacked photo) Showing outside 90 degree wrapped edge with same appearance: (stacked photo) Broken edge showing channels going through the width. Ad
  7. cngodles

    Leaf Stem in shale perhaps

    Went looking for ferns and plants today. Spent my lunch hour splitting shale nearby. This one caught my eye. The ghosted pattern around the stem is interesting. I feel like it’s part of it seeing how symmetrical it is. And ideas? Length of the stem part is 2 1/8” (Don’t have a metric ruler handy) To me, the bottom portion is the base, so the shape is confusing.
  8. cngodles

    Domatoceras Perhaps?

    So most of what I find is Metacoceras or Pseudorthoceras, two very common cephalopods locally. I've found a few Solenochilus, but they are different enough that I know what I found right away. This specimen was discovered as a body chamber. I thought Metacoceras, because, why not? Anything of this shape usually is. After some moderate prep, I revealed some more body chamber, but not any suture marks. The venter is oddly shaped as well, with a shallow U shape. It might be crushed, so I didn't pay it too much mind. I also discovered that the body chamber is much larger than any Metac
  9. cngodles

    Pennsylvanian Ammonoid

    I've had this specimen sitting in my "I'll get to it later" pile since last year. I've learned a lot about Cephalopods the past year, one of them being the differences between Nautiloids and Ammonoids. Upon re-inspection of this yesterday, I noticed the shell lines, but more importantly the suture lines caught my eye. These do exist here, but I would call them pretty rare to find. Not being an expert, I would consider Wellerites or Schistoceras, but these are based on quick comparisons using a Pennsylvanian Cephalopods of Ohio book I have. I started to clean up the rock using an ai
  10. cngodles

    Late Carboniferous Gastropod

    Possible ID of Trepospira sphaerulata from a local gastropod expert, but he isn’t sure. Similar ones in a group with original specimen at the right. Left is suspect of being related, but it might be.
  11. cngodles

    Petalodous Teeth

    To date, I've found 4 teeth, all in the same general area. One is shallow, the others are a big longer. The 3rd is a bit broken, I don't think I have a photo online right now of it. All are attached firmly to the limestone and I don't have any hope of ever getting them out clean. 1st Tooth: 2nd Tooth: 3rd Tooth No photos of this one. Sorry I promised 4 teeth, sadly only photos of three. 4th Tooth:
  12. Petalodus12

    Lepidostrobophyllum or something else?

    Hi all, I discovered this rather unusual fossil at an exposure of shale a few feet above the Mahoning coal of the Glenshaw formation, which is Westphalian D in age. I was thinking that it is probably just Lepidostrobophyllum, as the Mahoning coal is pre Carboniferous Rainforest Collapse so lycopod material is relative common within its horizon. For those of you that don’t know, Lepidostrobophyllum is a leaf like part of the Lycopod reproductive cone. However, I have found arthropod material at this exposure before and just wanted to make sure that it is in fact Lepidostrobophyllum an
  13. cngodles

    Black Shale things

    Not sure what these are. There was loose shale near where I dig scattered on the ground. It had different things in it than I’m used to seeing. Maybe it was dumped from a different part of the strata, but shouldn’t be much further away. I’m not great with fish parts, are they maybe fish parts? Should I scratch them out or maybe some vinegar? There are a few other pieces that look tooth/horn shaped.
  14. cngodles

    Fossils of Parks Township

    https://fossil.15656.com/ Here is my personal website that targets fossils I have found locally. I try to post articles about particular finds, especially when it highlights a new genus or species for me, or a better specimen than I had before. I am highly interested in providing content for people searching online to find, especially about local specimens. I do my best to photograph each specimen to maximize detail and to satisfy curiosity. In keeping finds organized, I keep a catalog page and created a local numbering system: https://fossil.15656.com/about/fossil-catalog/
  15. cngodles

    Antiquatonia maybe? (Brachiopod)

    I think this is the genus Antiquatonia, but I’m looking for some confirmation. I found this back in April, going through my finds and trying to ID. Found in Limestone. Glenshaw Formation (Conemaugh Group)
  16. cngodles

    Limestone Mystery

    I'm working on my fossil limestone sink and there are a handful of fossils showing up in the polished bowl. Most are horn corals or shells, but this particular one caught my eye. It might just be a shell or something, but I figured I'd let trained eyes give it a shot. It's about 1inch long.
  17. cngodles

    Carboniferous Limestone

    This piece of limestone looked like sea shells (clams or brachiopods) at first glance. However it’s one bumpy continuous surface. Any idea? The rock would be around 305 million years old. The rock broke easily along this surface which made it easy to see. Shells typically show white preserved Agagonite on them as well. No such preservation on this surface. Rock from Western Pennsylvania, United States. The surface is wet. Ruler is in inches.
  18. I think this is Odontopteris. The flat leaf tips are what have me thinking that. I have lots of local shale that I can pull these from readily, but maybe once or twice over an hour I can pull one this size out. Any fern experts here able to validate? Attaching a couple fossil plates that I use to identify local ferns.
  19. A second large Clam or Oyster? I dug a huge piece of limestone out of the hill and split it into three with a sledge hammer so that I could actually pick pieces up. After the heat this weekend, they were easy to pick apart once I got them home. Yesterday, I found the first piece. This is the one I found today. When it came out of the rock I was a bit shocked at how large it was. I carefully tapped around the specimen and was able to remove most of the surrounding rock carefully. This is the larger of the two pieces I found this weekend. I have less confidence in identif
  20. cngodles

    Late Carboniferous Oyster or Clam

    I love and hate finding large fossils. They are really interesting and striking to look at, but I have a hard time getting an ID on them. I dug a huge piece of limestone out of the hill and split it into three with a sledge hammer. After the heat this weekend, they were easy to pick apart. Yesterday, out popped this piece. There is another one I found today that I will be posting after this one. This piece has several wavy ridges. The shell material looks pearly, and perhaps some calcite replacement has happened. There was a piece of shell stuck on the mold portion as w
  21. cngodles

    Big clam?

    This thing is big, much bigger than clams and brachiopods I usually find. I haven’t attempted to remove it yet, because things this size usually break up when chipped out. I see shell material and some ridges in the steinkern. Excuse my clean hammer.
  22. cngodles

    Fenestella? Bryozoa of some type?

    Tonight I found a new limestone ledge sitting 6 inches from a stream water level. My father and I started hammering away at the shallow edges and removed a ton of interesting specimens. While there were some nice cephalopods, lots of brachiopods and clams, this piece caught my eye. I’ve read about Bryozoa and I’ve seen similar things on fossil plates. I believe I remember seeing pieces of them in limestone while digging, but never anything big. So, is it a Fenestella? Or something else? I’ve never found one worth showing. I saw a species list for it and it is very long.
  23. cngodles

    Long shot micro fossils

    Two mystery mini fossils. I’ll include scale photos, with marks at 1/2 mm. I’m on the lookout for Carboniferous Trilobites, and examples I’ve seen are very tiny in this formation, no more than 1/2 inch long.
  24. cngodles

    Worthenia perhaps

    While working on a specimen, this little gastropod fell out. Its measures about 7mm wide. Is it a Worthenia or something else? Being so small, I'm not sure it looks like the classic examples I find on fossil plates. Ruler is in mm. Found in the Glenshaw Formation. Pennsylvanian in age.
  25. One of my first exciting finds was a piece that looked like a tooth back in March. Turned out to likely be just a cool shaped rock. Fast forward 3 months and I finally found this today, which I believe is an actual tooth. But I'm no expert, is my identification correct?
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