Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'goniatite'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Hey Everyone :P
  • fossil maniac's Blog
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 45 results

  1. Devonian Belgian cephalopods

    It has been a while since I made a decent post on this forum ( spending most of my time here in the chatroom ) But last weekend I took the courage to prep some of my recent and older finds. In my older posts you could notice that I’m particularly interested in the Paleozoic fossils of my small country, especially if I can get some cephalopods. Although they are relatively rare here, we found a few deposits wielding them, and in the quarry of Lompret a specific layer has been really productive for them. Their conservation isn’t always very good and they might be hard to spot, but this I a selection that I made and prepped. I hope you enjoy them as much as I do. https://goo.gl/photos/s1N12Vic27d49GUb9 This one had a little surprise during the prep, while clearing the goniatite I discovered a small orthocone under it. ( Manticoceras sp + orthocone: might be orthoceras or Bactrites ) https://goo.gl/photos/Ek4BYCRckhLBxNWP7 Manticoceras sp. https://goo.gl/photos/hw1LotmNF4KzxCyp6 Multiple orthocones, the largest one judging by the position of the siphuncle should be an Orthoceras sp. https://goo.gl/photos/thc9WLxVT6zWgrTC8 Manticoceras sp. https://goo.gl/photos/bS4EniPSXf1miQVEA This is one of my favorites: a double Manticoceras sp. https://goo.gl/photos/exfdSJ2X1XzFtMy78 https://goo.gl/photos/oFvCtRKuWauJtKwL8 This is probably the best one in my colection: 3 complete Manticoceras and a partial one and a Orthocone. ( that last wan came loose during the prep and was glued back in position. ) I realy like the tiny specimen in the chamber of the larger one Cheers, Kevin
  2. Yet another fieldtrip to the late Devonian (Belgium) Last Saturday I organized with my pall Anthonie, a field trip for our Paleontology club. The location was the quarry in Lompret, here they exploit the hard limestone from the ancient Devonian reef ( Frasnian deposits ) On the top and sides of this reef we find softer deposits from the lagoons around it. The trip to the quarry rainy, as usual from the past few weeks, but et the location the clouds were clearing up. We waited for the whole group at the meeting point, and once complete we headed into the quarry. Here we made our first stop, explaining the geology and paleontology of this area and repeating the security measures. After this the group split in 2, the hardcore collectors went down in the hope to find an elusive trilobite an I took the rest of the group to the top where most fossils were commonly found. Once I found a decent spot I made a small review of the fossils that could be found and the people started looking around. Quickly the first corals and crinoid stems were found and sometimes a brachiopod or a gastropod. After helping anyone finding their way in the quarry I started to look for some nice specimens myself, and secretly hoping to find some cephalopods. The whole morning was quite uneventful, only later I finally found a couple of decent goniatites, and a small round intriguing fossil. One of the members also found a very nice orthoceras in the morning. At 12h we gathered for lunch and a quick review of the discoveries. Then we were surprised by heavy rainfall, it only last for 10 minutes, but more were clearly to come. In the following hour, we had several downpours an several participants started to give up and head back home. I stayed with a dozen participants and after a while we finally had dry weather again. Now we were looking for a layer that I discovered last year with small cephalopods. With a friend we managed to clear 1 m² of that layer, and it turned out great , together we found around 26 goniatites and a bunch of orthoceras and bactrites. Not all were well preserved, but some of them were really good specimens. Finally at 17h we called it a day ,and with the last participants we visited a local tavern for a drink and supper. Double goniatite As for the little round fossil, after some prepping, it turned out to be a crinoid calyx Cheers, Kevin
  3. It has been a while that I made a decent field trip. Past Sunday I left with 2 friends to a quarry in the Ardennes from Belgium. Last year we made a few visits to that place with great success and a fair number of late Devonian cephalopods were found. So hoping to add a few goniatites to our collections we left early in the morning. The weather conditions for the trip were terrible: it was raining and the wind was blowing very hard. Before we got to the quarry the rain stopped, but there was still a lot of wind. The rain had turned most of the flat parts of the quarry into a muddy swamp. But the heavy wind blew the last dark clouds away and we started our prospection in the slag heaps on top of the quarry. The first corals where collected, mostly hexagoniaria and a worn goniatite . I made my find of the day in the first 30 minutes in the quarry: In one of those slag heaps I found a large boulder with a large orthocone on it. The specimen was deformed during fossilization, but after clearing the specimen out it proved to be a complete orthoceras of 25cm in length. This was a monster compared to the most specimens I found there before. The next stop was a level lower in the ancient part of the quarry, here they were dumping the rocks that where not suited for production, but luckily for us, lots of fossils could be found in them. This was the most productive part of the day. Although they were hard to find, each of us found at least a couple of decent goniatites. The rest of the day we spent in the back of the quarry where lots of corals can be found and sometimes a nicely preserved goniatite. Multiple mineral veins are also present with large barite and calcite crystals. Sadly with the expansion of the quarry the part with the corals was cleared with bulldozers and fossil finds where rare at that location. Still I managed to find an exquisite goniatite specimen, a little damaged, but with very clear suture markings. My two friends searched through the mineral veins and found multiple good quality barite and calcite crystals. Meanwhile I prospected other parts and collected a little bag full of small corals and crinoid stems. (Back to the car with heavy Calcite and Barite cristals...) Usually we end our day at a local tavern for a drink, but this time I was too tired and I still had an hour drive to home. I’m already looking forward to my next field trip on 21/02 Then we will be prospecting early carboniferous deposits. Kevin
  4. Middle Devonian Goniatite from Kingston, NY

    From the album Middle Devonian

    Tornoceras mosopleuron (goniatite) Middle Devonian Mount Marion Formation Dave Elliot Bed Hamilton Group Route 209 road cut Kingston, NY.
  5. Belgian Devonian deposits Part 2

    Fieldtrip in the Belgian Devonian deposits Part 2 Saturday 07/11/2015,I had a new fieldtrip to the quarry that I visited last time. This time, we had a whole group of 25 people from the “BVP” (Belgian group of Paleontology) to guide around the quarry. But we also went to take some specific field notes, a friend of us is studying the stratigraphy of a new part of the quarry. He had marked the specific new layers with paint. The deposits are late Devonian (Frasnian) limestone and schists containing fossils from the ancient reefs nearby. So the most common fossils where corals, crinoid stems, bryozoan, gasteropods and brachiopods. But since the deposits are a little away from the reefs sometimes fossils of swimming predators can be found in the form of shells from Goniatites, Orthocereas or Bactrites. My goal for today was hopefully to find a nice looking cephalopod, I found a few last time so maybe I could find better specimens today. I got there early, so waiting for the group I prospected the debris next to the quarry, This proved to be an excellent start, I found 2 large goniatites and a part of an orthoceras. Although the specimens where very badly preserved and incomplete this was looking very promising. A friend of mine arrived there shortly after. I showed him the fossils and we went back to those piles hoping for more. The next fossils that where found where multiple corals “Hexagonaria” a few crinoid particles and brachiopods. Before we got ready to go down in the quarry to wait for the group , we each found an impressive fossil. I got a complete orthocone from an Orthoceras, I had found fragments of Orthoceras before, mostly not more than a few chambers, but I had never seen one like this. My friend got a complete and good preserved 3.5” goniatite with showed nicely the septa’s of the shell. This was an incredible way to start the trip. my orthocone: Kevin's goniatite: After this we went down to the meeting point where we waited for the group. This was in a trackway for the bulldozers next to a barite vein and before the deposits we were going to prospect. It was at this location that I was sitting next to my bag when I saw the group enter the quarry. At that moment my friend was already trying to dislodge some Barite crystals with a crow bar… I heard him scream, something had gone wrong… He had lost grip of his crowbar resulting in his finger smashed. I went down the track to see what was wrong and while watching my steps I saw some suture lines peering through the mud. I picked it up and realized I found perfectly preserved Goniatite. I then got to my friend with this awkward moment when I had to ask if he was all right while showing him the terrible fossil I just picked up. Only adding to his agony. (sorry Kev. ) the awesome Goniatite: After a litle cleanup at home: After this incident we met with the group and Anthonie the one who organized the field trip. Seeing a few familiar faces and a few new enthusiastic kids new to fossil hunting. Anthonie explained the stratigraphy and age of the deposits. We then passed around some of the fossils we picked up to show everyone what to look for. I then took time to take some of the starting collectors to spots that where easy to prospect and shared info about the specimens they found. I distributed the fossils I found at those spots among the Kids until we gathered for lunch. One of the members found an incredible fossil between the corals and crinoid parts. A perfectly preserved Crinoid calyx with his arms folded into itself. Apparently this kind of position is due to asphyxiation of the animal. But other spectacular specimens where found: During lunch another participant showed us a 2nd crinoid calyx, but this time with his arms unfolded. After lunch I went to another part of the quarry with Kevin and Anthonie that we hadn’t prospected before, this was the old part that they are starting to fill with debris from the new pit. Fossils where much rarer in this part but I managed to pull out 2 extra goniatites out the debris. Anthonie made another impressive find by cracking open a small nodule.: this rock revealed the head of a phacopid trilobite. He contacted an expert this weekend about this and apparently this is the first specimen found in this quarry. Yay, I found another Goniatite: After that the day got to an end, we went back to the group and started to gather all the participants, to head back to the cars and discuss al the great discoveries made that day. Everybody was pleased with their finds and a few of us went for a drink and dinner at a local tavern where we spent the rest of the evening. I hope you all enjoyed reading this report. Kevin Houben ( thanks to Anthonie for the pictures)
  6. Fieldtrip in the Belgian Devonian deposits Sunday 26/07: The objective of this day was to return with some friends to the quarry we visited last month. we found there previously some interesting spots that contained, apart from the traditional corals and brachiopods, some Cephalopod fossils. I left home at 8.30AM with my pall Joris who isn’t really interested in fossils, but he is a photographer and wanted to make some photo album of a fossil field trip. We left in the direction of Couvin where another friend awaited us with his son for their first fossil hunt ever, from there we left to the designated quarry. At the quarry we had a meetup with a few other friends , three of them geologist, and one of them was a frequent visitor of this quarry. With a few of his instructions about the stratigraphy of the deposits we started our search for fossils. The first ones to pop out where of course the corals, followed with crinoid stems and brachiopods. Some of the specific layers did indeed reveal multiple cephalopods, mostly fragments, but a few nice complete Goniatites where found. We also collected a lot of limestone nodules that could contain cephalopods. (I am currently trying the freeze-thaw method on couple of nodules) I managed to find an exceptional block containing an association of multiple Goniatites with an Orthoceras. And a very nice single Goniatite specimen (Manticoceras sp.) from around 6 cm in diameter. My friend’s son got tired and they both went home, but he was really happy with all the fossils he found on his first field trip. After Lunch we had to left the quarry and make way for a group that went clay pigeon shooting at this location. We then drove to a nearby road cut construction site for some more fossil prospection. The upper part delivered the usual Coral fauna. In the lower part of the construction site we found large solitary corals and a few trilobite parts. I found a decent cephalon of phacopid trilobite and a large pice of crinoid stems. Anthonie found a rather unusual fossil that none of us could determine, he posted the specimen at the forum for determination: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/57990-id-requested-on-devonian-problematica/ After this we went to a rather isolated outcrop near a railroad track. At this location the outcrop was overgrown for a part, but the sediments where stuffed with crinoids. And an occasional Goniatite was found. It was then already 5PM and I got really tired, this resulted in a distracted move where I whacked my thumb with my hammer. At this part I Decided that it was best to call it a day. I left whit Joris back home, after a long but productive day. The others stayed a while longer and ended with a visit to a local tavern for dinner and a drink. Thanks to “Paleo Tony” (Anthonie) for the pictures: Up to the next location... Someone is looking back at us... the part that I missed The best specimens I found that day:
  7. Hello everyone, I am attempting to identify and generally date two fossils, one which I believe is a medium sized ammonite based on the fern-like outer shell patterning, and the other a large grouping of orthoceras. The 'ammonite' measures 12" x 10" x 6", and the grouping of 'orthoceras' measures 15" x 5" x 3-1/2". Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance, Christy H.
  8. Tornoceras arkonense

    From the album Hungry Hollow Fossils

    Tornoceras arkonense, Arkona Formation (Eifelian), Arkona (7 mm)

    © &copy

  9. Tornoceras arkonense

    From the album Hungry Hollow Fossils

    Tornoceras arkonense, Arkona Formation (Eifelian), Arkona (8 mm)

    © ©

  10. Tornoceras arkonense

    From the album Hungry Hollow Fossils

    Tornoceras arkonense, Arkona Formation (Eifelian), Arkona (9 mm)

    © ©

  11. What Is This? Goniatite?

    Hello, Is this a goniatite? Woolooma Formation NSW Australia Carboniferous
  12. Devonian Goniatite from Albany, County, NY

    From the album Middle Devonian

    Tornoceras mesopleuron (goniatite) Middle Devonian Dave Elliot Bed Mount Marion Formation Hannacroix Ravine Albany Co., NY
  13. Goniatite from Penn Dixie pyrite bed

    From the album Middle Devonian

    Tornoceras uniangulare, goniatite 1/4 inch Middle Devonian Windom Shale Pyrite bed Moscow Formation Hamilton Group Penn Dixie Quarry Blasdell, NY
  14. Goniatite

    From the album Middle Devonian

    Goniatite Middle Devonian Upper Ludlowville Formation Hamilton Group Geer Road quarry Lebanon, NY Found by my friend, Steve and generously donated to the author.
  15. Tornoceras Goniatite

    From the album Middle Devonian

    Tornoceras mosopleuron (goniatite) Middle Devonian Mount Marion Formation Dave Elliot Bed Hamilton Group Route 209 Roadcut Kingston, NY
  16. IMG 1918 (2)

    From the album Crinoids and Other Mississippian Period Fauna

    Side view where the septa can be seen.
  17. IMG 1917

    From the album Crinoids and Other Mississippian Period Fauna

    Outside shell of Goniatite
  18. IMG 1916

    From the album Crinoids and Other Mississippian Period Fauna

    Goniatite piece filled with calcite crystals Lower Bangor Limestone formation, Mississippian age found on the Tennessee/ Alabama border. Measures 2.5 cm in length.
  19. These are a few of the pdf files (and a few Microsoft Word documents) that I've accumulated in my web browsing. MOST of these are hyperlinked to their source. If you want one that is not hyperlinked or if the link isn't working, e-mail me at joegallo1954@gmail.com and I'll be happy to send it to you. Please note that this list will be updated continuously as I find more available resources. All of these files are freely available on the Internet so there should be no copyright issues. Articles with author names in RED are new additions since May 21, 2018. Phylum Mollusca Class Cephalopoda - Ammonites, Nautiloids and Their Allies (Ordovician - Triassic) Ordovician Ordovician Cephalopods - Africa/Middle East Evans, D.H. (2000). A Cephalopod Fauna from the Middle Ordovician of Saudi Arabia. Palaeontology, Vol.43, Part 3. Evans, D.H., M. Ghobadi Pour and L.E. Popov (2013). Review of Early to Mid Ordovician orthoconic cephalopods from Iran. Bulletin of Geosciences, 88(1). Gabbott, S.E. (1999). Orthoconic Cephalopods and Associated Fauna from the Late Ordovician Soom Shale Lagerstätte, South Africa. Palaeontology, Vol.42, Part 1. Kröger, B. and B. Lefebvre (2012). Palaeogeography and palaeoecology of early Floian (Early Ordovician) cephalopods from the Upper Fezouata Formation, Anti-Atlas, Morocco. Fossil Record, 15(2). Ordovician Cephalopods - Antarctica Vaughan, A.P.M., et al. (2012). Late Ordovician-Silurian orthoconic nautiloid cephalopods in the View Point Formation conglomerate, Antarctic Peninsula. Antarctic Science, 24(6). Ordovician Cephalopods - Asia/Malaysia/Pacific Islands Kobayashi, T. (1987). Comparison of Ordovician Cephalopods between Australia and Eastern Asia. Proc. Japan Acad., Series B, Vol.63, Number 9. Kobayashi, T. (1987). On the Manchuroceras and Piloceras Provinces in the Ordovician Period. Proc. Japan Acad., Series B, Vol63, Number 9. Kobayashi, T. (1987). Ordovician Cephalopods of Yangtze and Neighboring Areas. Proc. Japan Acad., Series B, Vol.63, Number 7. Kobayashi, T. (1987). Ordovician Cephalopods in Hwangho Basin, Eastern Asia. Proc. Japan Acad., Series B, Vol.63, Number 7. Kobayashi, T. (1977). 673. Manchuroceras Found in South Korea With Notes on the Manchuroceratidae and the Manchuroceras Province. Trans.Proc.Palaeont.Soc. Japan, N.S., Number 105. Niko, S. and M. Sone (2015). Gondwanan nautiloid cephalopods from the Ordovician of Myanmar. Paleontological Research, Vol.19, Number 4. Niko, S. and M. Sone (2014). Actinocerid cephalopods from the Ordovician of Myanmar, and their paleobiogeographic implications for northern Gondwana. Paleontological Research, Vol.18, Number 2. Stait, B. and C.F. Burrett (1982). Wutinoceras (Nautiloidea) from the Setul Limestone (Ordovician) of Malaysia. Alcheringa, 6. Yun, C.-S. (2003). Further study of the Middle Ordovician cephalopod Holmiceras coreanicum with a revision of two Geisonoceras species from Korea. Paleontological Research, Vol.7, Number 4. Yun, C.-S. (1999). Ordovician cephalopods from the Maggol Formation of Korea. Paleontological Research, Vol.3, Number 3. Yun, C.-S. (1999). Three Ordovician cephalopods from the Jigunsan Formation of Korea. Paleontological Research, Vol.3, Number 2. Ordovician Cephalopods - Australia/New Zealand Kobayashi, T. (1987). Comparison of Ordovician Cephalopods between Australia and Eastern Asia. Proc. Japan Acad., Series B, Vol.63, Number 9. Stait, B. (2008). Ordovician Nautiloids of Tasmania. Ph.D. Thesis - University of Tasmania. (372 pages) Stait, B. and J. Laurie (1985). Ordovician nautiloids of central Australia, with a revision of Madiganella Teichert & Glenister. BMR Journal of Australian Geology & Geophysics, 9. Ordovician Cephalopods - Europe (including Greenland and Siberia) Bogolepova, O.K. and H.P. Schönlaub (1998). The First Nautiloid from the Upper Ordovician of the Carnic Alps (Austria). Jb.Geol. B.-A., 141(1). Evans, D.H. and A.H. King (1990). The Affinities of Early Oncocerid Nautiloids from the Lower Ordovician of Spitsbergen and Sweden. Palaeontology, Vol.33, Part 3. King, A.H. (1998). A Review of the Cyclostomiceratid Nautiloids, Including New Taxa from the Ordovician of Oland, Sweden. Palaeontology, Vol.41, Part 2. Kröger, B. (2014). The cephalopods of the Boda Limestone, Late Ordovician, of Dalarna, Sweden. European Journal of Taxonomy, 41. Kröger, B. (2008). A new genus of middle Tremadocian orthoceratoids and the Early Ordovician origin of orthoceratoid cephalopods. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 53(4). Kröger, B. (2007). Concentrations of juvenile and small adult cephalopods in the Hirnantian cherts (Late Ordovician) of Porkuni, Estonia. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 52(3). Kröger, B. (2004). Revision of Middle Ordovician orthoceratacean nautiloids from Baltoscandia. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 49(1). Kröger, B. and D.H. Evans (2011). Review and palaeoecological analysis of the late Tremadocian - early Floian (Early Ordovician) cephalopod fauna of the Montagne Noire, France. Fossil Record, 14(1). Kröger, B. and M. Isakar (2006). Revision of annulated orthoceridan cephalopods of the Baltoscandic Ordovician. Fossil Record, 9(1). Kröger, B. and H. Mutvei (2005). Nautiloids with Multiple Paired Muscle Scars from Lower-Middle Ordovician of Baltoscandia. Palaeontology, Vol.48, Part 4. Kröger, B., Y. Zhang and M. Isakar (2009). Discosorids and Oncocerids (Cephalopoda) of the Middle Ordovician Kunda and Aseri Regional Stages of Baltoscandia and the early evolution of these groups. Geobios, 42. Kröger, B., et al. (2011). Mass concentration of Hirnantian cephalopods from the Siljan District, Sweden; taxonomy, palaeoecology and palaeobiogeographic relationships. Fossil Record, 14(1). Manda, S. (2008). Trocholites Conrad, 1838 (Nautiloidea, Tarphycerida) in the Middle Ordovician of the Prague Basin and its palaeobiogeographical significance. Bulletin of Geosciences, Vol.83,3. Rasmussen, J.A. and F. Surlyk (2012) Rare finds of the coiled cephalopod Discoceras from the Upper Ordovician of Bornholm, Denmark. Bulletin of the Geological Society of Denmark, Vol.60. Strand, T. (1933). The Upper Ordovician Cephalopods of the Oslo Area. Norsk geol.tidsskr., XIV. Ordovician Cephalopods - North America Frey, R.C. (1995). Middle and Upper Ordovician Nautiloid Cephalopods of the Cincinnati Arch Region of Kentucky, Indiana and Ohio. U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1066-P. Kesling, R.V. (1961). A New Species of Billingsites, an Ascoceratid Cephalopod, from the Upper Ordovician Ogontz Formation of Michigan. Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology - The University of Michigan, Vol.XVII, Number 3. Kröger, B. and E. Landing (2009). Cephalopods and Paleoenvironments of the Fort Cassin Formation (Upper Lower Ordovician), Eastern New York and Adjacent Vermont. J.Paleont., 83(5). Kröger, B. and E. Landing (2008). Onset of the Ordovician cephalopod radiation - evidence from the Rochdale Formation (middle Early Ordovician, Stairsian) in eastern New York. Geol.Mag., 145(4). Kröger, B. and E. Landing (2007). The Earliest Ordovician Cephalopods of Eastern Laurentia - Ellesmocerids of the Tribes Hill Formation, Eastern New York. J.Paleont., 81(5). Ordovician Cephalopods - South America/Central America/Caribbean Cichowolski, M. (2009). A review of the endocerid cephalopod Protocyptendoceras from the Floian (Lower Ordovician) of the Eastern Cordillera, Argentina. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 54(1). Cichowolski, M. and N.E. Vaccari (2011). The oldest record of Eothinoceratidae (Ellesmerocerida, Nautiloidea): Middle Tremadocian of the Cordillera Oriental, NW Argentina. Geological Journal, 46(1). Cichowolski, M., et al. (2014). The nautiloid Family Eothinoceratidae from the Floian of the Central Andean Basin (NW Argentina and South Bolivia). Geological Journal, 50(6). Kobayashi, T. (1987). Ordovician Cephalopods in the Andes, South America. Proc. Japan Acad., Series B, Vol.63, Number 9. Kröger, B., M.S. Bersi and E. Landing (2007). Early Orthoceratoid Cephalopods from the Argentine Precordillera (Lower-Middle Ordovician). J.Paleont., 81(6). Mestre, A., M.S. Beresi and S. Heredia (2013). Nautiloid Cephalopod Concentration Beds in the San Juan Formation (Middle Darriwilian) of the Argentine Precordillera. In: Conodonts from the Andes. Albanesi, G.L. and G. Ortega (eds.), Publicacion Especial Number 13. General Ordovician Cephalopods Evans, D.H. (1992). Phragmocone Implosion in Ordovician Nautiloids and the Function of Siphonal Diaphragms and Endocones. Palaeontology, Vol.35, Part 3.Kröger, B., T. Servais, and Y. Zhang (2009). The Origin and Initial Rise of Pelagic Cephalopods in the Ordovician. PLoS ONE, 4(9). Kröger, B. (2008). A new genus of middle Tremadocian orthoceratoids and the Early Ordovician origin of orthoceratoid cephalopods. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 53(4). Mutvei, H. (2015). Characterization of two new superorders Nautilosiphonata and Calciosiphonata and a new order Cyrtocerinida of the subclass Nautiloidea; siphuncular structure in the Ordovician nautiloid Bathmoceras (Cephalopoda). GFF, Vol.137, Part 1. Mutvei, H. (1997). Siphuncular structure in Ordovician endocerid cephalopods. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 42(3). Teichert, C. and R.E. Crick (1974). Endosiphuncular Structures in Ordovician and Silurian Cephalopods. The University of Kansas Paleontological Contributions, Paper 71. Silurian Silurian Cephalopods - Africa/Middle East Niko, S., et al. (1999). Early Silurian actinocerid and orthocerid cephalopods from the Kerman area, East-Central Iran. Paleontological Research, Vol.3, Number 1. Turek, V. (2008). Boionautilus gen.nov. from the Silurian of Europe and North Africa (Nautiloidea, Tarphycerida). Bulletin of Geosciences, 83(2). Silurian Cephalopods - Antarctica Vaughan, A.P.M., et al. (2012). Late Ordovician-Silurian orthoconic nautiloid cephalopods in the View Point Formation conglomerate, Antarctic Peninsula. Antarctic Science, 24(6). Silurian Cephalopods - Asia/Malaysia Bogolepova, O.K. and C.H. Holland (1995). Concentrations of Silurian nautiloid cephalopods from Russia and Kazakhstan. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 40(4). Kobayashi, T. (1988). 1. The Silurian Cephalopods and Trilobites from the Yokokurayama Formation, Shikoku, Japan. Proc. Japan Acad., 64, Series B. Kobayashi, T. (1983). On the Silurian Cephalopod Faunule from Mt. Yokokura, Kochi Prefecture, Shikoku, Japan. Proc. Japan Acad., 59, Series B. Niko, S., M. Sone and M.S. Leman (2018). Late Silurian cephalopods from Langkawi, Malaysia, with peri-Gondwanan faunal affinity. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, Vol.16, Number 7. Niko, S., T. Hamada and T. Yasui (1989). 875. Silurian Orthocerataceae (Mollusca: Cephalopoda) from the Yokokurayama Formation, Kurosegawa Terrane. Tran.Proc.Palaeont.Soc. Japan, N.S., Number 154. Silurian Cephalopods - Europe (including Greenland and Siberia) Bogolepova, O.K. and C.H. Holland (1995). Concentrations of Silurian nautiloid cephalopods from Russia and Kazakhstan. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 40(4). Gnoli, M. and P. Serventi (2006). A Further Oncocerid Nautiloid from the Upper Silurian of Southwest Sardinia. Geo.Alp, Vol.3. Histon, K., B. Hubmann, and F. Messner (2010). A preliminary study of the upper Silurian nautiloid cephalopods from the Eggenfeld section (Graz Paleozoic, Austria). Bollettino della Societa Paleontologica Italiana, 49(1). Holland, C.H. (1999). The Nautiloid Cephalopod Order Ascocerida in the British Silurian. Palaeontology, Vol. 42, Part 4. Holland, C.H. (1998). The Nautiloid Cephalopod Order Actinocerida in the British Silurian. Palaeontology, Vol.41, Part 1. Holland, C.H. (1965). On the Nautiloid Leurocycloceras from the Ludlovian of Wales and the Welsh Borderland. Palaeontology, Vol.7, Part 4. Kolebaba, I. (1999). Gradual opening of the siphonal tube in an orthoconic cephalopod from the Silurian of Central Bohemia (Czech Republic). Journal of the Czech Geological Society, 44/1-2. Manda, Š. (2008). Palaeoecology and palaeogeographic relations of the Silurian phragmoceratids (Nautiloidea, Cephalopoda) of the Prague Basin, Bohemia. Bulletin of Geosciences, 83(1). Manda, Š. (2007). New Silurian nautiloids Phragmoceras Broderip, 1839, and Tubiferoceras Hedstrom, 1917, from the Prague Basin (Bohemia). Bulletin of Geosciences, 82(2). Manda, Š. and V. Turek (2015). Colour patterns on Silurian orthocerid and pseudorthocerid conchs from Gotland - palaeoecological implications. Estonian Journal of Earth Sciences, 64(1). Manda, Š. and V. Turek (2009). Minute Silurian oncocerid nautiloids with unusual colour patterns Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 54(3). Manda, Š. and V. Turek (2009). A Silurian oncocerid with preserved colour pattern and muscle scars (Nautiloidea). Bulletin of Geosciences, 84(4). Mutvei, H. (2012). Siphuncular structure in Silurian discosorid and ascocerid nautiloids (Cephalopoda) from Gotland, Sweden: implications for interpretation of mode of life and phylogeny. GFF, Vol.00, Part x. Serventi, P., M. Gnoli, and L. Simonetto (2010). Actinocerid cephalopods from the Silurian of the Carnic Alps (Italy). Bollettino della Societa Paleontologica Italiana, 49(1). Turek, V. (2008). Boionautilus gen.nov. from the Silurian of Europe and North Africa (Nautiloidea, Tarphycerida). Bulletin of Geosciences, 83(2). Silurian Cephalopods - North America Foerste, A.F. (1924). Silurian Cephalopods of Northern Michigan. Contributions from the Museum of Geology - The University of Michigan, Vol.II, Number 3. (114 pages) General Silurian Cephalopods Gnoli, M. (2003). Northern Gondwanan Siluro-Devonian Palaeogeography Assessed by Cephalopods. Palaeontologia Electronica, 5(2). Hewett, R.A. (1984). Growth Analysis of Silurian Orthoconic Nautiloids. Palaeontology, Vol.27, Part 4. Kolebaba, I. (2002). A contribution to the theory of the cameral mantle in some Silurian Nautiloidea (Mollusca, Cephalopoda). Bulletin of the Czech Geological Survey, Vol.77, Number 3. Stridsberg, S. (1988). A Silurian Cephalopod Genus with a Reinforced Frilled Shell. Palaeontology, Vol.31, Part 3. Stridsberg, S. and V. Turek (1997). A revision of the Silurian nautiloid genus Ophioceras Barrande. GFF, Vol.119. Turek, V. and Š. Manda (2012). "An endocochleate experiment" in the Silurian straight-shelled cephalopod Sphooceras. Bulletin of Geosciences, 87(4). Turek, V. and Š. Manda (2011). Colour pattern polymorphism in Silurian nautiloid Phragmoceras Broderip, 1839. Bulletin of Geosciences, 86(1). Devonian Devonian Cephalopods - Africa/Middle East Ashouri, A.R. and A. Yamini. Cephalopods and Stratigraphical Position of Cephalopod Bed of Shishtu Formation, Iran. Archive of SID. Becker, R.T. and M.R. House (2000). Emsian and Eifelian ammonoid succession at Bou Tchrafine (Tafilalt platform, Anti-Atlas, Morocco). Notes et Mem.Serv.geol. Maroc, Number 399. Becker, R.T. and M.R. House (1994). International Devonian goniatite zonation, Emsian to Givetian, with new records from Morocco. CFS, 169. Bockwinkel, J., R.T. Becker and V. Ebbighausen (2013). Late Givetian ammonoids from Hassi Nebech (Tafilalt Basin, Anti-Atlas, southern Morocco). Fossil Record, 16(1). Hairapetian, V. and D. Korn (2011). Phylogenetic analysis of the family Beloceratidae (Ammonoidea; Late Devonian) and a new Beloceras species from eastern Iran. Bulletin of Geosciences, 86(4). Klug, C. (2007). Sublethal injuries in Early Devonian cephalopod shells from Morocco. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 52(4). Kröger, B., C. Klug, and R. Mapes (2005). Soft-tissue attachments in orthocerid and bactritid cephalopods from the Early and Middle Devonian of Germany and Morocco. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 50(2). Devonian Cephalopods - Asia/Malaysia/Pacific Islands Niko, S. and T. Nishida (2003). Devonohelicoceras hidaense, a new torticonic oncocerid (Cephalopoda) from the Lower Devonian of Central Japan. Proc. Japan Acad., Series B, Vol.79, Number 7. Niko, S. and T. Nishida (2003). First oncocerid cephalopod from Japan. Proc. Japan Acad., Series B, Vol.79, Number 4. Devonian Cephalopods - Australia/New Zealand Jenkins, T.B.H. (1968). Famennian Ammonoids from New South Wales. Palaeontology, Vol.11, Part 4. Jenkins, T.B.H. (1966). The Upper Devonian Index Ammonoid Cheiloceras from New South Wales. Palaeontology, Vol.9, Part 3. Devonian Cephalopods - Europe (including Greenland and Siberia) Bandel, K., J. Reitner and W. Sturmer (1983). Coleoids from the Lower Devonian Black Slate ("Hunsruck-Schiefer") of the Hunsruck (West Germany). N.Jb.Geol.Palaont. Abh., 165/3. Becker, R.T. and M.R. House (1994). Kellwasser Events and goniatite successions in the Devonian of the Montagne Noire with comments on possible causations. CFS, 169. De Baets, K., et al. (2013). The first record of Early Devonian ammonoids from Belgium and their stratigraphic significance. Geologica Belgica, 16/3. Gattley, S.S. (1979). Upper Devonian Goniatite Environments in Belgium. Proceedings of the Ussher Society, Vol.4, Part 3. House, M.R. (2002). Devonian (Givetian) Goniatites from Woolborough, Barton and Lummaton, South Devon. Geoscience in south-west England, 10. Korn, D. (2014). Armatites kaufmanni n.sp., the first Late Devonian goniatite with ventral spines. N.Jb.Geol.Palaont. Abh., 271/3. Kröger, B., C. Klug, and R. Mapes (2005). Soft-tissue attachments in orthocerid and bactritid cephalopods from the Early and Middle Devonian of Germany and Morocco. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 50(2). Makowski, H. (1991). Dimorphism and evolution of the goniatite Tornoceras in the Famennian of the Holy Cross Mountains. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 36(3). Manda, Š. and V. Turek (2011). Late Emsian Rutoceratoidea (Nautiloidea) from the Prague Basin, Czech Republic: Morphology, Diversity and Palaeoecology. Palaeontology, Vol.54, Part 5. Manda, Š. and V. Turek (2009). Revision of the Pragian Rutoceratoidea Hyatt, 1884 (Nautiloidea, Oncocerida) from the Prague Basin. Bulletin of Geosciences, 84(1). Montesinos, J.R. and J.L. Garcia-Alcalde (1996). An Occurrence of the Auguritid Ammonoid Celaeceras in the Lower Devonian of Northern Spain. Palaeontology, Vol.39, Part 1. Turek, V. (2007). Systematic position and variability of the Devonian nautiloids Hercoceras and Ptenoceras from the Prague Basin (Czech Republic).Bulletin of Geosciences, 82(1). Turek, V. (2007). Colour patterns in Early Devonian cephalopods from the Barrandian Area: Taphonomy and taxonomy. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 54(3). Woroncowa-Marcinowska, T. (2011). Late Famennian (Devonian) Balviinae (Ammonoidea) from the Holy Cross Mountains, Poland. Acta Geologica Polonica, Vol.61, Number 1. Woroncowa-Marcinowska, T. (2006). Upper Devonian Goniatites and Co-Occurring Conodonts from the Holy Cross Mountains: Studies of the Polish Geological Institute Collections. Annales Societatis Geologorum Poloniae, Vol.76. Devonian Cephalopods - North America Becker, R.T. and R.H. Mapes (2010). Uppermost Devonian ammonoids from Oklahoma and their palaeobiogeographic significance. Acta Geologica Polonica, Vol.60, Number 2. Foerste, A.F. (1927). Devonian Cephalopods from Alpena in Michigan. Contributions from the Museum of Geology - The University of Michigan, Vol.II, Number 9. House, M.R. (1978). Devonian Ammonoids from the Appalachians and Their Bearing on International Zonation and Correlation. Special Papers in Palaeontology, Number 21. House, M.R. and A.E.H. Pedder (1963). Devonian Goniatites and Stratigraphical Correlations in Western Canada. Palaeontology, Vol.6, Part 3. Stanley, G.D. and C. Teichert (1976). Lamellorthoceratids (Cephalopoda, Orthoceroidea) from the Lower Devonian of New York. The University of Kansas Paleontological Contributions, Paper 86. General Devonian Cephalopods Becker, R.T. and M.R. House (1994). International Devonian goniatite zonation, Emsian to Givetian, with new records from Morocco. CFS, 169. Becker, R.T. and M.R. House (1993). New Early Upper Devonian (Frasnian) Goniatite Genera and the Evolution of the "Gephurocerataceae". Berliner geowiss. Abh., 9. De Baets, K., C. Klug and D. Korn (2011). Devonian pearls and ammonoid-endoparasite co-evolution. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 56(1). House, M.R. (1973). An Analysis of Devonian Goniatite Distributions. Special Papers in Palaeontology, Number 12. House, M.R. (1960). Abnormal Growth in Some Devonian Goniatites. Palaeontology, Vol.3, Part 2. House, M.R. and J.D. Price (1985). New Late Devonian Genera and Species of Tornoceratid Goniatites. Palaeontology, Vol.28, Part 1. Korn, D. (1992). The Ammonoid Faunal Change Near the Devonian-Carboniferous Boundary. Annales de la Societe geologique de Belgique, T.115, fasc.2. Korn, D. (1992). Heterochrony in the evolution of Late Devonian Ammonoids. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 37(1). Korn, D., et al. (2011). Beloceras, the most multilobate late Devonian ammonoid. Bulletin of Geosciences, 86(1). Carboniferous Carboniferous Cephalopods - Africa/Middle East Klug, C., K. De Baets and D. Korn (2016. Exploring the limits of morphospace: Ontogeny and ecology of late Visean ammonoids from the Tafilalt, Morocco. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 61(1). Korn, D., J. Bockwinkel and V. Ebbighausen (2010). The ammonoids from the Argiles de Teguentour of Oued Temertasset (early Late Tournaisian; Mouydir, Algeria). Fossil Record, 13(1). (118 pages) Korn, D., C. Klug and R.H. Mapes (2005). The Lazarus Ammonoid Family Goniatitidae, the Tetrangularly Coiled Entogonitae, and Mississippian Biogeography. J.Paleont., 79(2). Niko, S., A. Pillevuit and G. Stampfli (1997). Nautiloid and bactritoid cephalopods from the Carboniferous of the Jebel Qamar South area, United Arab Emirates. Paleontological Research, Vol.1, Number 3. Carboniferous Cephalopods - Asia/Malaysia/Pacific Islands Fujikawa, M., T. Ishibashi and N. Nakorsri (1999). Middle Carboniferous cephalopods from Loei area, northern Thailand. GEOSEA '98 Proceedings, Geol.Soc. Malaysia Bull.43. Niko, S. (2001). Middle Carboniferous orthoconic cephalopods from the Omi Limestone Group, Central Japan. Paleontological Research, Vol.5, Number 2. Niko, S. (2000). New cephalopod material from the Bashkirian (Middle Carboniferous) of the Ichinotani Formation, Central Japan. Paleontological Research, Vol.4, Number 4. Niko, S. (1990). 904. Early Carboniferous (Visean) Cephalopods from the Hikoroichi Formation, Southern Kitakami Mountains. Trans.Proc.Palaeont.Soc. Japan, N.S., Number 159. Niko, S. and T. Hamada (1987). 841. Adnatoceras from Middle Carboniferous of the Ichinotani Formation, Fukuji District, Central Japan. Trans.Proc.Palaeont.Soc. Japan, N.S., Number 148. Niko, S., T. Nishida and Y. Kyuma (1995). A new Carboniferous cephalopod Bogoslovskya akiyoshiensis from Southwest Japan. Trans.Proc.Palaeont.Soc. Japan, N.S., Number 179. Carboniferous Cephalopods - Australia/New Zealand Brown, D.A., K.S.W. Campbell and J. Roberts (1965). A Visean Cephalopod Fauna from New South Wales. Palaeontology, Vol.7, Part 4. Carboniferous Cephalopods - Europe (including Greenland and Siberia) Bisat, W.S. (1957). Upper Visean Goniatites from the Manifold Valley, North Staffordshire. Palaeontology, Vol.1, Part 1. Butcher, N.E. and F. Hodson (1960). A Review of the Carboniferous Goniatite Zones in Devon and Cornwall. Palaeontology, Vol.3, Part 1. Foord, A.H. (1897). Monograph of the Carboniferous Cephalopoda of Ireland. The Palaeontographical Society, London. (470 pages, 24 MB download) Ford, T.D. (1965). The Palaeoecology of the Goniatite Bed at Cowlow Nick, Castleton, Derbyshire. Palaeontology, Vol.8, Part 1. Hodson, F. and E.W.J. Moore (1959). Goniatites striatus and Related Forms from the Visean of Ireland. Palaeontology, Vol.1, Part 4. Korn, D. (1994). Revision of the Rhenish Late Visean Goniatite Stratigraphy. Annales de la Societe geologique de Belgique, Vol.117, Number 1. Korn, D. and R. Feist (2007). Early Carboniferous ammonoid faunas and stratigraphy of the Montagne Noire (France). Fossil Record, 10(2). Korn, D. and J.W. Tilsley (2002). A well-preserved early Namurian ammonoid fauna with Cravenoceras leion Bisat 1930 from Backdale Mine, Hassop, Derbyshire, England. Proceedings of the Yorkshire Geological Society, Vol.54, Part 2. Korn, D. and K. Horn (1997). The Late Visean (Early Carboniferous) goniatite stratigraphy in the South Portuguese Zone, a comparison with the Rhenish Massif. Newsl.Stratigr., 35(2). Matthews, S.C. (1970). A New Cephalopod Fauna from the Lower Carboniferous of East Cornwall. Palaeontology, Vol.13, Part 1. Phillips, D. (1985). The Nautiloid Brachycycloceras in the Upper Carboniferous of Britain. Palaeontology, Vol.28, Part 2. Riley, N.J. (1996). Mid-Dinantian Ammonoids from the Craven Basin, North-West England. Special Papers in Palaeontology, Number 53. Trewin, N.H. (1970). A Dimorphic Goniatite from the Namurian of Cheshire. Palaeontology, Vol.13, Part 1. Carboniferous Cephalopods - North America Bieber, C.L. (1957). Fossil Cephalopods of Mississippian Age, Central Putnam County, Indiana. Proceedings of the Indiana Academy of Science. Doguzhaeva, L.A., R.H. Mapes and H. Mutvei (2003). The Shell and Ink Sac Morphology and Ultrastructure of the Late Pennsylvanian Cephalopod Donovaniconus and its Phylogenetic Significance. Berliner Palaobiol.Abh., 03. Furnish, W.M., et al. (1964). The Upper Mississippian Ammonoid Delepinoceras in North America. Palaeontology, Vol.7, Part 2. Gordon, M. (1964). California Carboniferous Cephalopods. Geological Survey Professional Paper 483-A, United States Government Printing Office. Gordon, M. (1964). Carboniferous Cephalopods of Arkansas. Geological Survey Professional Paper 460, United States Government Printing Office. Gordon, M. (1957). Mississippian Cephalopods of Northern and Eastern Alaska. Geological Survey Professional Paper 283, United States Government Printing Office. Kluessendorf, J. and P. Doyle (2000). Pohlsepia mazonensis, an Early 'Octopus' from the Carboniferous of Illinois, USA. Palaeontology, Vol.43, Part 5. Korn, D. and A.L Titus (2011). Goniatites Zone (middle Mississippian) ammonoids of the Antler Foreland Basin (Nevada, Utah). Bulletin of Geosciences, 86(1). Kröger, B. and R.H. Mapes (2005). Revision of Some Common Carboniferous Genera of North American Orthocerid Nautiloids. J. Paleont., 79(5). Kröger, B. and R.H. Mapes (2004). Lower Carboniferous (Chesterian) Embryonic Orthoceratid Nautiloids. J.Paleont., 78(3). Mapes, R.H. (1979). Carboniferous and Permian Bactritoidea (Cephalopoda) in North America. The University of Kansas Paleontological Contributions, Article 64. (15.4MB download) Mapes, R.H., E.A. Weller and L.A. Doguzhaeva (2010). Early Carboniferous (Late Namurian) coleoid cephalopods showing a tentacle with arm hooks and an ink sac from Montana, USA. In: Cephalopods - Present and Past. Tanabe, K., et al. (eds.), Tokai University Press, Tokyo. Mapes, R.H., et al. (2010). The oldest known (Lower Carboniferous - Namurian) protoconch of a rostrum-bearing coleoid (Cephalopoda) from Arkansas, USA: phylogenetic and paleobiologic implications. Ferrantia, 59. Miller, A.K. and H.F. Garner (1955). Lower Mississippian Cephalopods of Michigan. Part III. Ammonoids and Summary.Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology - The University of Michigan, Vol.XII, Number 8. Miller, A.K. and H.F. Garner (1953). Lower Mississippian Cephalopods of Michigan. Part II. Coiled Nautiloids.Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology - The University of Michigan, Vol.XI, Number 6. Miller, A.K. and H.F. Garner (1953). Lower Mississippian Cephalopods of Michigan. Part I. Orthoconic Nautiloids. Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology - The University of Michigan, Vol.X, Number 7. Miller, A.K., J.H. Lane and A.G. Unklesbay (1947). A Nautiloid Cephalopod Fauna from the Pennsylvanian Winterset Limestone of Jackson County, Missouri. University of Kansas Paleontological Contributions, Mollusca Article 2. Niko, S. and R.H. Mapes (2015). Early Carboniferous nautiloids from the Ruddell Shale Member in Arkansas, Midcontinent North America. Paleontological Research, Vol.19, Number 1. Niko, S. and R.H. Mapes (2005). Early Carboniferous trigonoceratid nautilids from the Pitkin Formation of Arkansas, Midcontinent North America. Paleontological Research, Vol.9, Number 3. Niko, S. and R.H. Mapes (2004). A new Early Carboniferous nautilid from the Caney Formation of Oklahoma, Central North America. Paleontological Research, Vol.8, Number 4. Petersen, M.S., D. Korn and J. Kullmann (2000). The Early Mississippian (Osagean) Ammonoid Dzhaprakoceras (Cephalopoda) from Utah. J.Paleont., 74(5). Smith, J.P. (1903). The Carboniferous Ammonoids of America. Monographs of the United States Geological Survey, Vol.XLII. (225 pages) Tanabe, K. and R.H. Mapes (1995). Jaws and Radula of the Carboniferous Ammonoid Cravenoceras. J.Paleont., 69(4). Tanabe, K., N.H. Landman and R.H. Mapes (1998). Muscle attachment scars in a Carboniferous goniatite. Paleontological Research, Vol.2, Number 2. Tanabe, K., et al. (2001). External features of embryonic and early postembryonic shells of a Carboniferous goniatite Vidrioceras from Kansas. Paleontological Research, Vol.5, Number 1. Tanabe, K., et al. (1993). Analysis of a Carboniferous embryonic ammonoid assemblage - implications for ammonoid embryology. Lethaia, Vol.26. Titus, A.L., et al. (2015). Late Visean (late Mississippian) ammonoids from the Barnett Shale, Sierra Diablo Escarpment, Culberson County, Texas, USA. Fossil Record, 18. Carboniferous Cephalopods - South America/Central America/Caribbean Riccardi, A.C. and N. Sabattini (1975). Cephalopoda from the Carboniferous of Argentina. Palaeontology, Vol.18, Part 1. General Carboniferous Cephalopods Doguzhaeva, L.A., R.H. Mapes and H. Mutvei (2010). Evolutionary patterns of Carboniferous coleoid cephalopods based on their diversity and morphological plasticity. In: Cephalopods - Present and Past. Tanabe, K., et al. (eds.), Tokai University Press, Tokyo. Figge, K. (1968). A Goniatite Fauna from the Visean-Namurian Boundary. Palaeontology, Vol.11, Part 2. Hodson, F. and W.H.C. Ramsbottom (1973). The Distribution of Lower Carboniferous Goniatite Faunas in Relation to Suggested Continental Reconstructions for the Period. Special Papers in Palaeontology, Number 12. Holdsworth, B.K. (1965). The Namurian Goniatite Nuculoceras stellarum (Bisat). Palaeontology, Vol.8, Part 2. Hyatt, A. (1891). Carboniferous Cephalopods. Geological Survey of Texas, Second Annual Report. Korn, D., et al. (2012). Early Carboniferous (Mississippian) ammonoid biogeography. Geobios, 45. Tanabe, K., Y. Shigeta and R.H. Mapes (1995). Early Life History of Carboniferous Ammonoids Inferred from Analysis of Shell Hydrostatics and Fossil Assemblages. Palaios, Vol.10. Permian Permian Cephalopods - Africa/Middle East Niko, S., A. Pillevuit and T. Nishida (1996). Early Late Permian (Wordian) non-ammonoid cephalopods from the Hamrat Duru Group, central Oman Mountains. Trans.Proc.Palaeont.Soc. Japan, N.S., Number 183. Teichert, C. and M. Rilett (1974). Revision of Permian Ecca Series Cephalopods, Natal, South Africa. The University of Kansas Paleontological Contributions, Paper 68. Permian Cephalopods - Asia/Malaysia/Pacific Islands Ehiro, M. (1995). Cephalopod fauna of the Nakadaira Formation (Lower Permian) in the Southern Kitakami Massif, Northeast Japan. Trans.Proc.Palaeont.Soc. Japan, N.S., Number 179. Ehiro, M. and A. Misaki (2005). Middle Permian ammonoids from the Kamiyasse-Imo district in the Southern Kitakami Massif, Northeast Japan. Paleontological Research, Vol.9, Number 1. Ehiro, M. and H. Araki (1997). 5. Permian cephalopods of Kurosawa, Kesennuma City in the Southern Kitakami Massif, Northeast Japan. Paleontological Research, Vol.1, Number 1. Ehiro, M. and F. Takizawa (1989). 885. Foordiceras and Domatoceras (Nautiloid Cephalopods) from the Upper Permian Toyoma Formation, Southern Kitakami Massif, Northeast Japan. Trans.Proc.Palaeont.Soc. Japan, N.S., Number 155. Niko, S. and M. Ehiro (2002). Permian orthoconic cephalopods of the Ochiai Formation in the Southern Kitakami Mountains, Northeast Japan. Paleontological Research, Vol.6, Number 4. Niko, S. and T. Nishida (1987). 828. Early Permian Cephalopods from the Mizuyagadani Formation, Fukuji District, Central Japan. Trans.Proc.Palaeont.Soc. Japan, N.S., Number 146. Niko, S., M. Sone and M.S. Leman (2005). A new Permian species of Mooreoceras (Cephalopoda: Orthocerida) from northwestern Peninsular Malaysia. Proc. Japan Acad., Series B, Vol.81, Number 8. Niko, S., T. Nishida and K. Nakazawa (2000). Orthoconic cephalopods from the Lower Permian Atahoc Formation in East Timor. Paleontological Research, Vol.4, Number 2. Shen, S., L. Mu, and Y.D. Zakharov (2004). Roadoceras (Permian Ammonoidea) from the Qubuerga Formation in the Mt. Everest Area in Southern Tibet. Gondwana Research, Vol.7, Number 3. Sone, M., M.S. Leman and M. Ehiro (2001). Middle Permian cephalopods from central Peninsular Malaysia: implications for faunal migration through the southern Tethys. Journal of Asian Earth Sciences, 19. Permian Cephalopods - Australia/New Zealand Teichert, C. and H.O. Fletcher (1943). A Permian ammonoid from New South Wales and the correlation of the Upper Marine Series. Records of the Australian Museum, 21(3). Permian Cephalopods - Europe (including Greenland and Siberia) Barskov, I.S., T.B. Leonova and O.P. Shilkovsky (2014). Middle Permian Cephalopods of the Volga-Ural Region. Paleontological Journal, Vol.48, Number 13. Mapes, R.H., et al. (2007). A Newly Hatched Coiled Nautiloid from the Permian of Italy. J.Paleont., 81(5). Permian Cephalopods - North America Lucas, S.G., K. Krainer and L.F. Rinehart (2014). Nautiloids from the Early Permian Yeso Group, Otero County, New Mexico. In: Geology of the Sacramento Mountains Region. Rawling, G., et al. (eds.), New Mexico Geological Society 65th Annual Field Conference Guidebook. Maeda, H., R.H. Mapes and G. Mapes (2003). Taphonomic Features of a Lower Permian Beached Cephalopod Assemblage from Central Texas. Palaios, Vol.18. Mapes, R.H. (1979). Carboniferous and Permian Bactritoidea (Cephalopoda) in North America. The University of Kansas Paleontological Contributions, Article 64. (15.4MB download) Miller, A.K. and W. Youngquist (1947). Lower Permian Cephalopods from the Texas Colorado River Valley. University of Kansas Publications, Article 1. Wilson, E.C. (1984). The Goniatite Agathiceras (Mollusca: Cephalopoda) in the Lower Permian (Wolfcampian) of California. Journal of Paleontology, Vol.58, Number 1. General Permian Cephalopods Leonova, T.B. (2011). Permian Ammonoids: Biostratigraphic, Biogeographical and Ecological Analysis. Paleontological Journal, Vol.45, Number 10. Triassic Triassic Cephalopods - Africa/Middle East Brayard, A., et al. (2007). Paraharpoceras Chao: a new ammonoid lineage surviving the end-Permian mass extinction. Lethaia, Vol.40. Krystyn, L. and F. Tatzreiter (1991). Middle Triassic Ammonoids from Aghdarband (NE-Iran) and their Paleobiogeographical Significance. In: The Triassic of Aghdarband (AqDarband), NE-Iran, and its Pre-Triassic Frame. Ruttner, E.W. (ed.), Abh.Geol. B.-A., 38. Seyed-Emami, K., et al. (2009). Upper Triassic (Norian) Cephalopods from the Ekrasar Formation (Shemshak Group) of Northern Alborz, Iran. Revista Italiana di Paleontologia e Stratigrafia, Vol.115, Number 2. Zakharov, Y.D. and N.M. Abnavi (2013). The ammonoid recovery after the end-Permian mass extinction: Evidence from the Iran-Transcaucasia area, Siberia, Primorye, and Kazakhstan. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 58(1). Triassic Cephalopods - Asia/Malaysia/Pacific Islands Bando, Y. and M. Ehiro (1982). 750. On Some Lower Triassic Ammonites from the Osawa Formation at Asadanuki, Towa-Cho, Tome-Gun, Miyagi Prefecture, Northeast Japan. Trans.Proc.Palaeont.Soc. Japan, N.S., Number 127. Brayard, A., et al. (2007). Paraharpoceras Chao: a new ammonoid lineage surviving the end-Permian mass extinction. Lethaia, Vol.40. Bruhwiler, T., H. Bucher and N. Goudemand (2010). Smithian (Early Triassic) ammonoids from Tulong, South Tibet. Geobios, 43. Bruhwiler, T., et al. (2011). A new early Smithian ammonoid fauna from the Salt Range (Pakistan). Swiss J.Palaeontol., 130. Bruhwiler, T., et al. (2010). New Early Triassic ammonoid faunas from the Dienerian/Smithian boundary beds at the Induan/Olenekian GSSP candidate at Mud (Spiti, Northern India). Journal of Asian Earth Sciences, 39. Ishibashi, T. (1972). 607. Upper Triassic Cephalopods from the Tanoura District, Kumamoto Prefecture, Japan. Trans.Proc.Palaeont.Soc. Japan, N.S., Number 88. Monnet, C., et al. (2013). Globacrochordiceras gen.nov. (Acrochordiceratidae, late Early Triassic) and its significance for stress-induced evolutionary jumps in ammonoid lineages (cephalopods). Fossil Record, 16(2). Mu, L., et al. (2007). Early Induan (Early Triassic) Cephalopods from the Daye Formation at Guiding, Guizhou Province, South China. J.Paleont., 81(5). Nakazawa, K. and Y. Bando (1968). Lower and Middle Triassic Ammonites from Portuguese Timor (Palaeontological Study of Portuguese Timor, 4). Memoirs of the Faculty of Science, Kyoto University, Series of Geol. and Mineral., Vol.XXXIV, Number 2. Sone, M., M.S. Leman and I. Metcalfe (2004). Triassic nautiloid Sibyllonautilus from Gua Bama, Peninsular Malaysia and its regional stratigraphic implications. Alcheringa, 28. Ware, D., et al. (2015). High-resolution biochronology and diversity dynamics of the Early Triassic ammonoid recovery: The Dienerian faunas of the Northern Indian Margin. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 440. Zakharov, Y.D. and N.M. Abnavi (2013). The ammonoid recovery after the end-Permian mass extinction: Evidence from the Iran-Transcaucasia area, Siberia, Primorye, and Kazakhstan. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 58(1). Triassic Cephalopods - Australia/New Zealand Kummel, B. (1965). New Lower Triassic Ammonoids from New Zealand. New Zealand Journal of Geology and Geophysics, 8:3. Kummel, B. (1960). New Zealand Triassic Ammonoids. New Zealand Journal of Geology and Geophysics, 3:3. Kummel, B. (1959). Lower Triassic Ammonoids from Western Southland, New Zealand. New Zealand Journal of Geology and Geophysics, 2:3. Triassic Cephalopods - Europe (including Greenland and Siberia) Arkadiev, V.V. and M.N. Vavilov (1984). Mid Triassic Parapopanoceratidae and Nathorstididae (Ammonoidea) of Boreal Region: Internal Structure, Ontogeny and Phylogenetic Patterns. Geobios, Number 17/4. Doguzhaeva, L.A., H. Summesberger and H. Mutvei (2006). An Unique Upper Triassic Coleoid from the Austrian Alps Reveals Pro-Ostracum and Mandibule Ultrastructure. Acta Universitatis Carolinae - Geologica, 49. Doguzhaeva, L.A., et al. (2004). Bituminous soft body tissues in the body chamber of the late Triassic ceratitid Austrotrachyceras from the Austrian Alps. Mitt.Geol.-Palaönt.Inst.Univ. Hamburg, Vol.88. Donovan, D.T. and M.K. Howarth (1982). A Rare Lytoceratid Ammonite from the Lower Lias of Radstock. Palaeontology, Vol.25, Part 2. Donovan, D.T. (1966). The Lower Liassic Ammonites Neomicroceras Gen.Nov. and Paracymbites. Palaeontology, Vol.9, Part 2. Dzik, J. (1990). The Ammonite Acrochordiceras in the Triassic of Silesia. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 35(1-2). Kaim, A. and R. Niedzwiedzki (1999). Middle Triassic ammonoids from Silesia, Poland. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 44(1). Klug, C. (2001). Functional morphology and taphonomy of nautiloid beaks from the Middle Triassic of southern Germany. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 46(1). Klug, C. and I. Jerjen (2012). The buccal apparatus with radula of a ceratitic ammonoid from the German Middle Triassic. Geobios, 45. Klug, C. and A. Lehmkuhl (2004). Soft-tissue attachment structures and taphonomy of the Middle Triassic nautiloid Germanonautilus. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 49(2). Klug, C., et al. (2004). The Black Layer in Cephalopods from the German Muschelkalk (Triassic). Palaeontology, Vol.47, Part 6. Konstantinov, A.G. and E.S. Sobolev (2004). Specific Geographic Differentiation of Boreal Cephalopods of Carnian Age. Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol.45, Number 8. Landman, N.H., et al. (2001). Micro-ornamentation on the embryonic and post-embryonic shells of Triassic ceratites (Ammonoidea). American Malacological Bulletin, Vol.16(1/2). Nakazawa, K., K. Nakamura and G. Kimura (1987). Discovery of Otoceras boreale Spath from West Spitsbergen. Proc. Japan Acad., Series B, Vol.63, Number 6. Schweigert, G. and D. Fuchs (2012). First record of a true coleoid cephalopod from the Germanic Triassic (Ladinian). N.Jb.Geol.Palaont. Abh., 266/1. Weitschat, W. (2008). Intraspecific variation of Svalbardiceras spitzbergensis (Frebold) from the Early Triassic (Spathian) of Spitsbergen. Polar Research, 27. Zakharov, Y.D. and N.M. Abnavi (2013). The ammonoid recovery after the end-Permian mass extinction: Evidence from the Iran-Transcaucasia area, Siberia, Primorye, and Kazakhstan. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 58(1). Triassic Cephalopods - North America Brayard, A., et al. (2013). Smithian ammonoid faunas from Utah: implications for Early Triassic biostratigraphy, correlation and basinal paleogeography. Swiss J.Paleontol., published on-line. Bucher, H. (1992). Ammonoids of the Shoshonensis Zone (Middle Anisian, Middle Triassic) from Northwestern Nevada (USA). Jb.Geol. B.-A., 135(2). Gomez-Luna, M.E. and A. Martinez-Cortes (1997). Relationships and Differences Between the Triassic Ammonoid Successions of Northwestern Sonora, Mexico, and West-Central Nevada, U.S.A.. Revista Mexicana de Ciencias Geologicas, Vol.14, Number 2. Hyatt, A. and J.P. Smith (1905). The Triassic Cephalopod Genera of America. United States Geological Survey Professional Paper 40, Series C, Systematic Geology and Paleontology, 74. (399 Pages) Konstantinov, A.G. and E.S. Sobolev (2004). Specific Geographic Differentiation of Boreal Cephalopods of Carnian Age. Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol.45, Number 8. Kummel, B. (1953). American Triassic Coiled Nautiloids. U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 250. Monnet, C., et al. (2013). Globacrochordiceras gen.nov. (Acrochordiceratidae, late Early Triassic) and its significance for stress-induced evolutionary jumps in ammonoid lineages (cephalopods). Fossil Record, 16(2). Nichols, K.M. and N.J. Silberling (1979). Early Triassic (Smithian) Ammonites of Paleoequatorial Affinity from the Chulitna Terrane, South-Central Alaska. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1121-B, United States Government Printing Office. Smith, J.P. (1932). Lower Triassic Ammonoids of North America. U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 167. Stephen, D.A., et al. (2010). Ammonoid beds in the Lower Triassic Thaynes Formation of western Utah, USA. In: Cephalopods - Present and Past. Tanabe, K., et al. (eds.), Tokai University Press, Tokyo. Ware, D., et al. (2011). Dienerian (Early Triassic) ammonoids from the Candelaria Hills (Nevada, USA) and their significance for palaeobiogeography and palaeoceanography. Swiss J.Geosci., 104. Triassic Cephalopods - South America/Central America/Caribbean Estep, J.W., S.G. Lucas and C.M. Gonzalez-Leon (1997). Middle Triassic Ammonites from Sonora, Mexico. Revista Mexicana de Ciencias Geologicas, Vol.14, Number 2. Gomez-Luna, M.E. and A. Martinez-Cortes (1997). Relationships and Differences Between the Triassic Ammonoid Successions of Northwestern Sonora, Mexico, and West-Central Nevada, U.S.A.. Revista Mexicana de Ciencias Geologicas, Vol.14, Number 2. General Triassic Cephalopods Balini, M., et al. (2010). Triassic ammonoid biostratigraphy: an overview. Geological Society, London, Special Publications 2010, Vol.334. Brayard, A. and G. Escarguel (2013). Untangling phylogenetic, geometric and ornamental imprints on Early Triassic ammonoid biogeography: a similarity-distance decay study. Lethaia, Vol.46. Dagys, A.S. and H. Keupp (1998). Internal ventral keels in Triassic ceratid ammonoids: description and functional interpretation as muscle scars. Z.dt.geol.Ges., 149/1. Jenks, J.F., et al. (2015). Chapter 13. Biostratigraphy of Triassic Ammonoids. In: Ammonoid Paleobiology: from macroevolution to paleogeography. Klug, C., et al. (eds.), Topics in Geobiology, 44. McGowan, A.J. and W. Kiessling (2013). Using abundance data to assess the relative role of sampling biases and evolutionary radiations in Upper Muschelkalk ammonoids. Acta Palaeontologia Polonica, 58(3). Tozer, E.T. (1972). Observations on the Shell Structure of Triassic Ammonoids. Palaeontology, Vol.15, Part 4.
×