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Found 122 results

  1. I have recently been looking at some of my photos from trips and found photos of when I was in Alberta in 2018. I seen a photo of a Hadrosaur footprint from a trackway in Dinosaur Provincial Park that me and my brother found. I also read not to long ago that no big trackways have been found in this area so I decided to give the information and location to the Palaeontologist at the Royal Tyrrell Museum in Drumheller, Alberta. I was responded by Dr. Caleb Brown, he told me that I was most likely right and it was probably Hadrosaur. I am currently waiting for him to reply again to see what he thinks about the other information of the trackway and footprint that I gave him. One of the footprints outlined in the photo with pen.
  2. Fibula ID please

    Hello, I recently finishing preparing this fossil and you may have seen it in the Prep section, however given I would also appreciate an ID, the smart suggestion was made to move it here. I bought this off Ryan at Hell Creek Dinosaurs who discovered it on one of his trips last summer to Hell Creek. Apologies for not having it next to a scale, but it's 46cm long. Ryan suggested it could be a Triceratops or a Hardosaur (Edmontosaurus one assumes) and although I was erring on the latter, will admit having seen some trike fibulas recently, now I'm not 100% sure, hence this post. Showing pics from the find (Ryan very kindly agreed I could use. Thanks again!) and now after prep. If these aren't clear enough or you need more to be able to help, just let me know. Any thoughts much appreciated. Thanks Dave ps: If you're questioning the prep, in my defence, it was my first ever...
  3. My first bone prep...

    Hey, Others viewing this section regularly will see my current project is a mosasaur skull, I have however been splitting my time between this and finishing my last (first real) prep project which has been dragging a little; this fibula. I bought this off a top chap (Ryan at Hell Creek Dinosaurs) who discovered it on one of his trips last summer, but decided it wasn't one for his collection. It was covered in a horrible chalk/clay coating which (as Ryan predicted) was the stuff of nightmares to get off. That said, with dark nights and miserable weather in the UK, time was something I have had on my side recently, so three months later, here's the finished item. In reality, it's been finished for a while, but I only got round to making the display stand yesterday and wanted to show the finished project. It's about 50cm long and comes from the Hell Creek formation. Ryan suggested it could be a Triceratops or a Hardosaur (Edmontosaurus one assumes) and although I'm erring on the latter, will admit I'm not 100% sure, so please let me know if you have a clearer opinion! Given this is my first 'real' prep job, would love to know thoughts and/or improvements I could make - It came in six sections, they were cleaned using a variety of tools (engraver, Dremel, dentist pics and various other hand tools/abrasives). End of each section stabilised and strengthened with CA, glued together with epoxy and finally coated in PVB to protect. Showing pics from find (Ryan very kindly agreed I could use. Sir, if you're a member of this forum and happen to see this, thanks again!) all the way through to now (as at yesterday in fact) Cheers Dave
  4. 3 new fossils

    Hi I just got these today and would like to show them. If you need more photos just ask. Thank you and enjoy!! Hadrosaur. indet carpel Horseshoe canyon formation, Drumheller valley, Alberta, Canada.
  5. 3 new fossils

    Hi I’m wondering if this is a Hadrosaur carpal or a carpal from another animal. I’ve seen photos and diagrams of Hadrosaur hands and it doesn’t seem to fit, just something with it just doesn’t settle with me as Hadrosaur carpal. Its 3.7cm by 3cm and is from the Horseshoe canyon formation of Alberta, Canada. Thank you!!
  6. This report is a bit late, but better late than never! During late July through to mid August 2018 i was on a research trip to study a new Canadian dinosaur footprint site for my Masters degree project. I am based in Australia, and this was the first time i had been to Canada! So of course i had to make the most of it and pay a visit to the world renowned Dinosaur Provincial Park in southern Alberta, arguably the richest site in the world for dinosaur fossils. The park is the best exposure of the Dinosaur Park Formation (which it is now named after), which dates to about 76.5 million years ago during the mid-Campanian. I had long read about this location and watched it on documentaries for so many years growing up as a kid. Finally being there in person was very surreal! I was quite lucky and managed to go on a long, extended walk through the park with one of the guides for about 6 hours in total. In this relatively short amount of time i observed so many amazing fossils. I must have been completely desensitised within the first 30 minutes! It really is incredible how much fossil material there is lying all over the park. In Australia, whole scientific papers are written about isolated or fragmentary dinosaur bones, yet here they were just lying everywhere! The pictures really speak for themselves. As said, all of these fossils were observed in the field during a single days visit to the park. As this is a World Heritage site, nothing was taken, all finds were put straight back onto the ground after i took these photos. It's a VERY hard thing to do, but rules are rules. The only thing that was removed from the park on my trip was my best find of the day... a near-perfect 5.3 cm tyrannosaur tooth from Gorgosaurus!!!! This find was too special to leave behind, so the park tour guide GPS marked the location and brought it back for display, likely at the visitor centre or as a demonstration piece for their guided tours. To say that i have found a tyrannosaur tooth is a great honour! You may remember it from the July 2018 VFOTM poll. Without further ado, here are the pics! It is going to take multiple posts to fit them all in, so scroll all the way down to see them all! Various dinosaur vertebrae. Everything from hadrosaurs (duck billed dinosaurs) and ceratopsians (horned dinosaurs) to theropods (two legged meat eaters) and ankylosaurs (armoured dinosaurs). These were so common! I would probably pick a new one up every 5 minutes or so. Ankylosaur tooth
  7. Hi I just bought these two dinosaur fossils from Alberta Canada. A Ceratopsian vert and a Hadrosaur metatarsal. The colouring and look/preservation of the Hadrosaur metatarsal makes me think they didn’t come from the Horseshoe canyon formation like it says but instead the Dinosaur Park formation. since it doesn’t give much information other then the Horseshoe canyon formation it’s possible, Thanks for future help. Ceratopsian vert
  8. Hadrosaurid teeth ID

    Hey everyone, I recently came across these two teeth online. They're both pretty worn down and might no longer possess the features necessary for a more detailed ID, but I'd appreciate your help in confirming that these are actually Hadrosaurid teeth. [images attached are the seller's] Tooth 1 comes from the Judith River Formation of Montana; measuring roughly 9mm [not specified in which direction; I assume depth].  Tooth 2 comes from parts of the Aguja Formation in Western Texas; measuring approximately 13x11mm [not specified along which sides]. Thank you for your help!
  9. What are the odds? A chunk of amber with an aphid fossil pressed against a Dinosaur jawbone from Alberta. https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2019/11/remarkable-fossil-features-insect-trapped-amber-stuck-dinosaur-jaw
  10. Two new from Aguja formation

    I found these two teeth in some matrix that I recently brought back from the Aguja formation in West Texas, Brewster county. I think one is a dromaeosaur tooth and the other a hadrosaur tooth.The serrations on both sides of the theropod tooth are about 6 per 1mm. The scale in the photos is 1mm. What do you think? Thanks for any help.
  11. Hadrosaur Tibia?

    Another piece from the collection at work: Description given is Hadrosaur Tibia. It was in the collection before I started here. It is in 2 distinct pieces, and it has been that way the entire time, since the foam cutouts in its box are shaped for them. It has broken in other places, but I've fixed those with paleobond (although I do have pictures of the broken cross sections somewhere) I'm mostly looking to confirm or disprove whether or not it's existing ID is plausible, and maybe identifying which side (right/left) it's from. Pictures: https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=17X4lkoWQODdUw1G4k12LclGVWYnwcAik
  12. Hadrosaur pubis:

    Another piece from the collection at work: All I've been told is that it was donated to us by a customer at a show in Helena, Montana. Its described as a Hadrosaur pubis. It's clearly seen some restoration work at some point, with many fractures mended together. Its in two pieces currently, which is how it was when I came on the show. One side is gently cambered, the other side is almost unnaturally flat, which is why a pubis bone makes sense to me. It was at one point called a Tyrannosaur scapula, but I'm not clear if that was actually what the donor called it before we decided it was a pubis, or if a former employee was calling it that to make it seem sexier. Photos: https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=19M6iJbx2IHUm-KxI9TwcFtnlCDGzpHcV
  13. Hadrosaur Humerus Repair/Prep

    I recently got this lovely mess of bone, which is a mostly complete hadrosaur right humerus that only requires some assembling. I actually bought this with the idea that it might be a fun project. But then it broke even more in the shipping. So I have my work cut out for me. It's from Judith River formation, Montana. It's hard to tell at the moment, but it seems to be a rather slender humerus. So that would make it more likely to be from the saurolophinae subfamily. But I will look into that some more when I have it assembled. So I will be doing lots of reassembling on this piece as well as prepping away some excess matrix that's still present. Besides the obvious problems, the bone itself is actually in very nice condition with some really smooth cortical bone as well as some lovely visible muscle scars. This is how it looked when I first opened it. Quite a mess. Also a drawing of what it should look like in context. And here I have slightly ordered the pieces. There's 5 big main pieces, three medium pieces and a whole bunch of tiny chunks. One of the bigger pieces that includes the ulnar and radial condyles. The shaft of the bone has had a pretty bad recent fracture. This is also where most of the smaller pieces come from.
  14. Fun with 3D Printing Fossils

    So recently my father bought a 3D printer and we've been experimenting printing some cool fossils for a while now. It's a really cool technology. Though it can take a while to print a piece the results are really quite cool. A life size Archaeopteryx can take a few days to print if you don't keep printing during the night. Finishing up the prints afterwards can also take a bit of time. Cleaning off all the supports and sanding down rough surfaces can be quite the process. Then there's painting depending on the desired result of course. There are actually a lot of nice things that can be found for download on the internet. Though many of these models still require a bit of digital cleanup before they could be printed. So here are a number of the painted, unpainted and half painted results. Most of the printed stuff is dinosaur. Photo of the 3D printer and the just finished print of a juvenile Edmontosaurus lower jaw. And here's the same Edmontosaurus jaw print half painted again with the real fossil in mirror image next to it. I scanned the original bone that I then mirrored digitaly so that I could print out the other side of the jaw. Allosaurus hand claw. Clidastes Mosasaur quadrate bone. Skull of the "Prosauropod" Massospondylus. Holotype right lower jaw of Owenodon hoggi, an Iguanodontid. Download link: https://sketchfab.com/3d-models/iguanodon-jawbone-f016ad38ebb647988dafd6bbdc1510d0 1/5th scale Nanotyrannus lancensis skull. The Cleveland specimen. Download link for original file: https://sketchfab.com/3d-models/nanotyrannus-lancensis-young-t-rex-7b0967fa27674d959647868686b6717b One of my favourites. The Eichstatt Archaeopteryx specimen. Download link for original file: https://sketchfab.com/3d-models/eichstatt-archaeopteryx-b71872ad42794ef7883021f2fa9a8079 The right side skeleton of the baby Parasaurolophus "Joe". Printed at 1/5th scale. Right humerus and pedal phalanges printed at life size. Most of the fossil prints are for my collection. But my dad also wanted a few cool things which I painted for him. Skulls of Dodo and Australopithecus Taung Child. Download link for Dodo original file: https://sketchfab.com/3d-models/dodo-264b7746a42b41b2845a499de16f8538 Most are painted roughly to look like their real counter parts.
  15. Fossil found in 1980's helps point to Hadrosaur origins in American Southwest. https://m.phys.org/news/2019-07-strange-species-duck-billed-dinosaur.html
  16. New Primitive Hadrosaur From Texas

    Newly described hadrosaur may have used its teeth to scoop or saw. https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/laelaps/paleontologists-unveil-shovel-billed-dinosaur/
  17. I am in the market to buy some dinosaur eggs and want to make sure these are real before buying them. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you all in advance! I can get more/better pictures if needed.
  18. Hi all, please be careful whenever you purchase Chinese vertebrate fossils or dinosaur eggs, especially turtles and birds. While some of these may look laughably fake, a search on purchase history reveals that these fossils have been sold over and over again. No prize for guessing which auction site these fossils were sold. I notice three devious techniques used by these sellers: 1) Issuing a certificate, claiming it's been examined by experts etc - Certs mean nothing, unless they are provided by actual museums 2) Selling some real fossils - I've been monitoring this seller's listings for years. Every now and then, a real one shows up. His victims may have bought something genuine from him before, and assumed all his listings are good. 3) Selling replicas alongside his fake fossils - By outright proclaiming some of his listings as replicas, this seller creates the impression that he is a responsible seller who would inform people about the true nature of their purchases. "The best lies have an element of truth" Remember, if you aren't absolutely sure of your purchase, post some pics here on TFF. We have experts who would help you if they can. Also, if you need more info about this listings or the seller, feel free to PM me.
  19. Did I find a Dino tooth

    Went hunting in the Antlers formation (same age as Cloverly Formation) i found this when looking. It stuck out as it was a different color then nearly every other rock I saw and it resembles some other worn hadrosaur teeth I’ve seen. Known Hadrosaur from the formation is Tenontosaurus. Thanks for the help everyone
  20. A Few Small But Cool New Dino Fossils

    We have been working primarily on our shark program material but we did add a few new dinosaur fossils. For the most part they are pretty small in size but add quite a bit to the education we do. These represent some iconic and scientifically important dinosaurs. In addition to these small fossils, we added a 6" Trike frill piece from HC, a smaller piece of a Horseshoe Canyon Ceratopsian frill, and a 2.5" Hadro vert from that formation. These are excellent touch fossils so I am happy ! The small fossils are..... Dromaeosaurus sp. Judith River. I big thank you thank you to @Troodon for some ID help. This is a really nice tooth and I am really excited about this one. We can get into some fun science about the study of tooth wear in determining what dinosaurs ate.
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