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  1. Hello, Heres another chunk of interesting-looking bone for which curiosity has finally gotten the best of me. This is a piece I picked up in 2021 on my summer dig at the Hell Creek Formation in Montana. I feel there’s a chance this piece might be identifiable. This piece of bone is bowl-shaped with a strange web-like texturing on the convex side. The edge of the bone which is not broken is rounded and almost flower petal like. There is a set of T-shaped rounded ridges on the concave side. Not the best quality bone either, with significant siderite encrustation being pre
  2. My Spring trip this year was quite a challenge. Last year we had oppressive heat, it was extremely dry with high winds. This year it was rain, rain and more rain and cool. The ranchers however are in heaven with pastures that are green, green and green. Hopefully it continues for them through the summer. So, we had a few rainout days, lots of drizzle and had to deal with gumbo feet, slippery cliffs and wet bones and matrix. Not the best of conditions for collecting and the group's results showed that. On the downside the day we departed Belle Fouche, where we stay, a ve
  3. Updated Dec 30, 2021 Collectors, online sellers and some dealers periodically ask me to help them in the identification of tyrannosaur type teeth. So I thought I would put together a guide from Western North America (US/Canada) to help in identification. The following is the current understanding of those Tyrannosaurids described/known with the stratigraphic unit where they are found. If I missed any let me know. Albertosaurus sarcophagus : Horseshoe Canyon Formation cf Albertosaurus indet: Wapiti Formation Gorgosaurus libratu
  4. ThePhysicist

    Juvenile T. rex tooth

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    A young T. rex tooth. The preservation of the enamel is fantastic, and I like the dark hues. The serrations are also in great shape. There is some minor feeding wear on the tip.
  5. ThePhysicist

    Juvenile Tyrannosaur tooth

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    Sold by the BHI as Nanotyrannus lancensis. However, given the uncertain status of Nanotyrannus' validity, I chose to label it as Tyrannosaurid for now. It is interesting to compare to my other small Tyrannosaur teeth of the same/similar position. The base is clearly more compressed than my baby rex tooth (which is also smaller).
  6. ThePhysicist

    Juvenile Tyrannosaur tooth

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    A Tyrannosaur tooth from Eastern Montana. Given the basal "pinching," this would be Nanotyrannus lancensis if it's valid (otherwise it's T. rex). Interesting to compare it to my other small Tyrannosaur teeth. The tip was probably broken after fossilization, but the gouges on the labial face may be inflicted while the tooth was in use. Note that the enamel is well-preserved with sharply resolved texture and is still clear.
  7. ThePhysicist

    Juvenile Triceratops tooth

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    Sold as Triceratops sp. by the BHI. Normally, Ceratopsid teeth should be considered indeterminate since the teeth of the large-bodied Ceratopsids present in the Hell Creek fauna are virtually indistinguishable. Trusting the ID of the BHI would be to label it as Triceratops sp., but to be conservative (and since I don't know their reasoning behind the ID), I chose to label it as Ceratopsidae cf. Triceratops sp.
  8. ThePhysicist

    Edmontosaurus tooth (maxillary)

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    Unworn Hadrosaur tooth from the maxillary (upper jaw). Based on the size, it could be from a juvenile.
  9. (EDITED 5/24/22) to add an undescribed Nodosaurid to Hell Creek/Lance Fm. I see a lot of misunderstanding on what is being sold online at auctions and dealers sites. Some have it correct but most mix up the terminology. So here is Anky 101 aimed at Novice collectors and I will keep it simple. What you see sold in most markets are teeth from late Cretaceous North American locations mostly Montana, Wyoming and the Dakota's so I will focus on those areas. (Hell Creek, Lance, Two Medicine and Judith River Formations) Teeth from Canadian locations will have similar characteristics.
  10. Troodontids certainly are one of my favorite dinosaur families. Intelligent and what a set of chompers to eat you with, all you can ask for in a cool dinosaur. Will start this with the Pectinodon teeth in my collection and will continue to add as I take photos. This species has some of the coolest teeth. Pectinodon bakkeri is the only named Troodontid in the Hell Creek and Lance Formations. This is a tooth taxon and its teeth are significantly much smaller than its big cousin Troodon formosus. Lance Formation Hell Creek
  11. Excellent paper that provides great insights into Hesperornithiformes. Some of the photos can also aid in identification of isolated elements. https://www.mdpi.com/1424-2818/14/4/267/htm
  12. siteseer

    New Dinosaur book

    Just a notice about a new book about the extinction of the dinosaurs and other organisms at the end of the Cretaceous, "The Last Days of the Dinosaurs," by Riley Black. I saw it in a local Barnes & Noble yesterday and read the blurb on the book jacket. I didn't get a chance to really leaf through it.
  13. ThePhysicist

    Juvenile Tyrannosaur tooth

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    Tyrannosauridae (Cf. Tyrannosaurus rex) Hell Creek Fm., Wibaux Co., MT, USA This minute tooth is indeed Tyrannosaur: the mc/dc serration densities are virtually identical, and the denticle shape is not like those of Dromaeosaurids. It also has a slight pathology near the tip.
  14. For those interested in Dinosaurs from North America here is an excellent presentation on Oviraptorosaurs. Demonstrates how the lack of understanding of ontogeny may have impacted the number of described species. Study is ongoing but may point to multiple caenagnathids in the Hell Creek/Lance Formation. https://youtu.be/TpY9ygiG4ng
  15. Looks like we will have a new book describing Vertebrate fossils from the Hell Creek Formation courtesy of the paleontologist Thomas Carr and others. What I heard is that the publication is scheduled for this fall, no idea of price. I was able to get a hold of a beta copy while visiting one of ranches I collect on and took some quick phone pictures. I had several reactions when I read the book, the dinosaur section getting poor grades while the other sections were informative. It was the first publication that covered vertebrates other than dinosaurs. The information shown was
  16. Joseph Kapler

    Tooth Identification

    Here is a small tooth collected from the Hell Creek formation, Garfield Montana, likely a juvenile. I think from its properties that it is a Nanotryannus. I would appreciate your thoughts.
  17. Hi all, I have some ideas (apart from the usual non-diagnostic dismissal) already but I'm coming back to this after many years because I never could settle on a position. Hell Creek formation, obviously dinosaur, not too far from one Tyrannosaur site from a recent excavation. Might be in MOR collections, don't know, but it was marked for pickup (we were scouting on a day off from the main site). Eroding out of the same slope as an several Edmontosaurus elements I found including a 75% complete scapula from a rather large adult. Any thoughts? My hand (25 cm / 10" span outstretched, so you
  18. ThePhysicist

    T. rex tooth

    Identification This is a classic T. rex tooth. It's clearly Tyrannosaurid by its robusticity, similar serration densities on each carina (mesial carina counted by the "roots" of the denticles as they are completely worn off), and chisel-shaped serrations. Those qualities with its locality and formation mean it must be the one and only. Notes The Crown Height Ratio (CHR) suggests a posterior position (it's short and stout). There's evidence of wear on the tip and mesial carina.
  19. ThePhysicist

    Tyrannosaur tooth

    Identification Tyrannosaur teeth characteristically have similar serration densities on each carina, with chisel-shaped denticles. Though small, this tooth matches those qualities, and doesn't resemble other smaller theropods like Dromaeosaurids. Identified as Cf. T. rex based on its similarity to another, larger tooth in my collection. Notes This tooth is from a juvenile individual. Serration densities illustrated in the above photos. There is a slight pathology (bend) near the tip.
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