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Found 60 results

  1. From the album Western NY Fossil Hunts

    Assorted Brachiopods, Horn Corals and Crinoid Stem Devonian Hamburg, NY Found 2019
  2. From the album Western NY Fossil Hunts

    Eldredgeops rana trilobite with Stereolasma rectum horn coral (After prep). Devonian Hamburg, NY Found 2019
  3. Eldredgeops Rana

    From the album Western NY Fossil Hunts

    Eldredgeops rana trilobite with Stereolasma rectum horn coral (Before prep). Devonian Hamburg, NY Found 2019
  4. Penn Dixie stuff

    Hello everyone! I'm here once again to ask for some identification help as I continue to work on my fossil area display. Today I have a few items from Penn Dixie (Hamburg, NY, mid-Devonian) for you to look at. But before I show the photos, I was wondering about the formation that we find fossils in at Penn Dixie - is it all Moscow Formation? Okay, now on to the photos... Specimen #1: A Platyceras gastropod, but I'm not sure of the species: Specimen #2: A horn coral on the same rock as the Platyceras - is it Stereolasma rectum or Amplexiphylum hamiltoniae? Specimen #3: I've posted this one before, asking if it was a goniatite or a gastropod, but I'm starting to think it's a gastropod with some of the middle missing - perhaps Naticonema lineata or Euomphalus laxus? Specimen #4: A brachiopod and horn coral on the same rock as the goniatite/gastropod specimen - is the brachiopod Athyris spiriferoides? And is the horn coral Stereolasma rectum or Amplexiphylum hamiltoniae? Specimen #5: An unknown piece of something on the same rock as the goniatite/gastropod and the brachiopod - any ideas? Thanks in advance! Monica
  5. I took my family across the river to Clarksville Indiana today to visit The Falls of the Ohio State Park. It was very hot with a high in the 90s, but we had a good time walking the Devonian fossil beds and visiting the Interpretive Center . The river was down enough to get onto the upper limestone beds, but the lower beds were still underwater. They are typically exposed during the months of September and October and occasionally in the summer when there is little rain (not this year!). The river is at 20 ft right now. The lower beds become dry around the 13.5 ft mark. Their official website has a page that monitors the river levels and tells you when certain areas and strata are exposed. I suggest checking that out before making the trip to visit the park. https://www.fallsoftheohio.org/current-ohio-river-conditions/ The Interpretive Center houses the main indoor exhibit, gift shop, a river viewing room, and bird/wildlife viewing room, along with friendly staff. The main exhibit has fossils and interactive areas for the kids. Not only are there fossil on display, but also sections regarding the Native Americans that lived in the area, the current wildlife, and information regarding the Lewis and Clark expedition. A piece of fossilized wood just outside of the center on the backside by the parking lot. It is roughly 4 feet in length and 2 feet wide. When you walk into the main foyer of the Interpretive Center this boulder is on display. It is about a meter across and half as thick. I don't want to spoil the trip for everyone so I'm just going to post some pictures of a few of my favorite pieces. I thought this was interesting. It's labeled as orange chert, which I assume it is, but it also has a horn coral right in the middle of it. A sampling of the fauna found in the fossil record here. There was also a small exhibit on mammoths as evidence of a few have been found in the surrounding area. Presumably crossing the Falls to get to the salt licks in Kentucky. This was a comparison of a mammoth and mastadon tooth. The interior exhibit is nice, but for me the best part of the Falls of the Ohio is outside. Its the fossil beds that you can walk on and explore. I've been here a few times and find something new each time I come. Remember folks, it's against the law to collect here. Leave the fossils alone for others to enjoy! No matter how tempting... . If you just have to collect something, the park usually has a couple of dump truck loads of material near the back of the parking lot that they allow you to search through. Seriously. Here are some of the fossils that me and the family found while walking around the fossil beds. A word of caution, if you want to get to certain areas there is some climbing that you must do. A lot of the strata has fissures or large boulders that must be climbed, or walked around to move farther down the coast. This is on the fossil beds themselves. You can stay higher on the slope and circumvent a lot of the really strenuous stuff, but the fossils are not as good the higher up you go. Here are a some of the more impressive horn coral that I found. They actually call these larger ones "tusk coral" because the are so large. I'm not certain what these coral are, but Siphonophrentis and Cystiphylloides are common here. I know a hand isn't the best for scale, but it's all I had at the time. lol From the tip of my index finger to where my thumb connects is just over 5 inches. Some mainly brachiopod hash plates. A large favosites. Crinoids Lace Bryozoan This was my favorite find. A large colonial coral. It is over a meter in diameter. What is commonly called a Pipe Organ Coral. Eridophyllum I think that is all for now. It was a great day of discovery and fun with the family. If you are in the area and have a couple of extra hours, I highly recommend you stop by and check out the sights for yourself. You won't be disappointed. Just remember to check the river water levels and be ready for a little exercise!
  6. Penn Dixie Round 1

    This year I pulled the trigger on heading to Penn Dixie for the Dig With the Experts weekend! Definitely would highly recommend . I drove up from Boston to the Buffalo area on Thursday and spent the day Friday digging with @Malcolmt and @JamesAndTheFossilPeach. It was a blast! Thanks again guys for giving me a lay of the land. Credit to @JamesAndTheFossilPeach for the find of the day with a giant Eldredgeops (pic below). Saturday and Sunday were spent looking for trilobites in the roped off Dig With the Experts section of excavated shale with some success. Monday I drove back to Boston, and stopped to stretch my legs in Glenerie, NY to walk a stretch of road looking for Devonian brachiopods and gastropods. Got a couple! All in all, a great trip... although I'm nice and sore . Here are my takeaways from the weekend. I tried to get a bit of the entire Penn Dixie Ecosystem keeping at least one of everything and as many trilobites as I could find. I wish I took more pictures Saturday and Sunday, but I was too busy splitting shale . Cheers, Barret
  7. Odd Coral from the Finis Shale

    I found this odd horn coral at the Lost Creek Dam site near Jacksboro, Texas. It's Upper Pennsylvanian, Graham formation, Finis Shale member. The horizontal wrinkling seems very organized, looking more like the ornamentation on a conulariid or some orthoconic cephalopods and the presence of dissepiments limit the possibilities some. The bottom was already broken off so I sanded it flat and polished it a bit for a look at the septal pattern but still can't seem to place it in it's proper niche. Dibunophyllum valeriae has been suggested and Lophamplexus sp. but I'm not convinced mostly because of the horizontal patterning.
  8. Fossil hunt at St Leon Indiana today. One inch square for scale. 8 Flexicalymene. One so small I can't even believe I saw it. Some mini brachiopods, some small horn coral and some gastropods.
  9. Hi everyone this is matt again today in the creek I found this cool coral in the creek on 28 mile creek near 28th creek Rd. between Kennedy and ellington here are 3 photos
  10. Day Two ; Locality One (or Six if you include Day One) Black Sahara, South of Erfoud 20th February 2019 Well this is where things really get interesting, so stick with this thread as there are dozens of photos of fossils coming up. Looks at the tags if you want clues. I was up bright and early and wandered out at about 7 am to watch the sun rise over the still mighty Erg Chebbi dunes. And as night's candles were burnt out and jocund day stood tiptoe over the misty duney tops, the chaps came to join me and managed lots of photos. Here's one, if you would like to see more, I'm busy posting a kazillion of 'em under the Nature Photography thread.
  11. Devonian solitary rugose coral

    Hey guys this coral keeps drawing my attention. We have hundreds of horn corals and pretty sure this is one, but it looks different than the others? Do you think it just preserved differently or could it be a less common type of solitary rugose coral? Any thoughts appreciated and thanks for looking!
  12. Rugose Coral

    All, I went fossil hunting at a new site a little north of downtown Nashville and hit paydirt with these large pieces of rock; they are absolutely packed full of rugose coral
  13. Hopefully this will be quick and easy for those who have the knowledge. I was meandering in the hills and came across some horn corals. I am used to calling the smaller one on the left a horn coral. I am presuming the one on the right also a horn coral. Would someone kindly provide sufficient naming to each so I can do some offline research and reading? Apologies for fuzzy pic. Camera seemed to only want to focus on the backdrop material.
  14. Today I stopped at a favorite roadcut near Vienna, Illinois at the intersection of I-24 & 146. This site contains Mississippian Fauna of the Chester Series / Upper Chester Group / Menard Limestone. Here are some of my finds- Pentremites spicatus Blastoids- (the larger 2) Archimedes screw and Crinoid Stem- Crinoid Basal Plates- Agassizocrinus (?) Brachiopods- Horn Coral- Fenestella Bryozoan- Hash Plates-
  15. Curious about this odd Grewingkia

    I'm really curious about this odd looking Grewingkia I found yesterday in the gravel beds of the Whitewater River in Franklin County Indiana. I've found quite a few, all clean of any substrate, many on top of the ground. Yesterday I found this one just about 10" below the surface of the gravel. Most of the horn coral has linear lines, but this one seems to be segmented unlike the others. Is it older or what causes the difference in this on compared to the others? I appreciate all of your help!
  16. The big horn coral embedded in the rock is about 1.5 inches long, for scale. I really like the colors! Anyone have any idea what species it could be? Whenever I find em' I just call em' "horn corals", but if you ask me, they look more like barnacles or something (even if they're unrelated -__-) Good hunting!
  17. New York Catskills Trip

    My wife and I are on a short trip through south eastern New York State, in the Catskill Mountain region. We had a more adventurous trip in mind but after some recent car trouble we didn't feel quite as adventurous as we did a week ago. We stopped today at a site on Schoharie Creek, a bit south of Gilboa. The heat and humidity kept us from spending more than a half hour at the site today, but we plan on going back tomorrow morning when it will be somewhat cooler. The river tumbled stones were mostly eroded, and I didn't bring my hammer down to the beach crowded with swimmers, but we did make one find worthy of bringing back to the motel. Leila usually makes the best finds when we're just scanning the ground, and she came up with this worn but still attractive horn coral. I love the way it's still attached to the matrix. It almost looks like it's been prepped: The same rock also shows off some nice specimens of what appear to be tube worms. Despite the heat we're enjoying our trip so far, and we're very happy with our motel except for one disturbing problem. Clinging to the door inside our lovely room is a five-foot-long mirror, and I am periodically startled by the strange old man peering at me. What's he doing in my room?! Mike
  18. Hey, My sister and I found this rock that we thought looked a lot like a claw or a tooth. We found it in Norway in a lake, because of the drought the water was a lot lower than usual, so the place we found it would normally be underwater. It's not too far from the ocean either. I really don't know much about any of this, so I'm sorry that I'm not including too much information. (And sorry about the tags, I had no idea what to put there) I hope someone is able to help us, thank you
  19. Probably horn coral.

    When I first found this fossil I had no idea what it was, but after only two days on this board I'm pretty sure it's horn coral. Learning quickly! Just looking for a positive ID, since I'm still very new and could certainly be wrong. Like the others, probably found on the Michigan/Indiana border. This is the last one for today. Thank you guys for all the help!
  20. I found all these specimens on the west side of the road cut. I believe those are eyes in the middle. All these specimens were found in Trammel Fossil Park in Sharonville, Ohio, with the exception of the two in the column on the right. They were from the St. Leon road cut. This tear-dropped shape bryozoan is, I believe, Homotrypella.
  21. ADAM's SILURIAN

    Hoooooooooooorrrrrrrrrrrraaaaaaayyyyyyyyyyy!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Here we are at last, into Adam's Silurian. Thanks for looking. First up is the Lower Silurian or Llandovery and I begin with a problem. I posted this one incorrectly in Adam's Ordovician as it had got it's label muddled up with an Ordovician Favosites I had that has vanished in the move here, but is being replaced by kind forum member @Herb Anyway, this, I remember now I've found the correct label, is from the greenish Browgill Formation, part of the Stockdale Group from a cutting near Skelgill (Skelghyll) in Cumbria, Northern England. It seems to be a tabulate coral, but I can't find any listed for this location, only mentions of small, rare, rugose corals. It has the star shaped corallites of a Heliolitidid, but seems to be tightly packed together like a Favositidid. A couple of species of Palaeofavosites seem to be close and are a bit star-shaped,, but anyone know any better? @TqB@piranha hmm who else? The coral bit, an external mold, is a maximum of 3.5 cm across and each corallite up to 2 mm.
  22. Hungry Hollow epibiont help

    Hello everyone! This past Saturday, Viola and I braved the cold to do some fossil collecting in the south pit of Hungry Hollow near Arkona, Ontario (Mid-Devonian). When I got home and washed up my specimens, I saw something interesting on one of the horn corals - I think it's a brachiopod - am I right? And does anyone know its identity? Thanks in advance for your help! Monica
  23. Help a 5th grader

    One of my students found this near Jacobia Texas and would like it identified if possible. I have more pictures of it on the forum's Facebook page.
  24. Rugose Corals

    I should preface this post by saying that the Paleozoic, marine ecosystems, and invertebrates are not generally my primary expertise, so I apologize if I am wildly off base or asking stupid questions. Sadly, I did not find these specimens myself, and so I do not have any particularly useful information on age or location. They were left in a desk drawer along with a collection of other invertebrate fossils, most (if not all) of which are Paleozoic in age. I have several different rugose coral species, and I would love to know if anyone can refine that identification further. I thought the colonial rugose coral might be an Eridophyllum species, but I would not bet much on my identification. The third is truthfully in terrible condition and I doubt there is much to say about it, but I thought I would see. Here are the pictures. Thank you in advance for your time and input. Specimen #1: Specimen #2: Specimen #3:
  25. Penn Dixie Partials

    Hello, all! So I am cleaning out my workshop to make room for a lot of new material coming in and to prepare for the upcoming season. I have wayyyyyy too much Penn Dixie material. I have, at this point, committed all of my complete bugs away. But I still have quite literally, TONS, of other material. What I am offering is Edlredgeops rana partials, this includes entire prepped bugs that are missing cephalons, stand alone cephalons, pygidiums, large but broken cephalons, half bugs, etc. (Please note, I am not offering any of these as complete. There is the real chance that some of the unprepped material COULD be complete, but I am not offering them as such. I also have Greenops pygidiums and partials, beat up examples with broken cephalons, etc. I also have a few Bellacartwrightia pygidiums laying around, and perhaps a few broken and partials of them as well. I also have massive quantities of hash plates from the Bay View coral layer, brachipods (Mucrospirifer, Pseudoatrypa, Rhipidomella, Spinatrypa), Spyroceras cephalopod partials, rugose and tablulate corals, clams, and other random bits. I am interested in trading for similar material from other locales. I am not expecting anyone to offer up prime specimens for any of this material, but I would love anyone else's throw-aways that include vertebrate material, plants, small fish, and the like. I am also considering minerals and gems. (Again, throw-aways are all I'm looking for, quantity beats quality on this one.) I will cover shipping domestically in the US, but can't really afford to ship out a ton of international packages this month. (I will still do international, we just might have to work something out.) If anyone is interested, please message me! I want this stuff gone as quickly as possible, it's getting to the point where I can't walk in my workshop anymore! If you let me know what you're interested in I will take photos of some examples, but it would take me a full weekend at least to photograph everything that I have available. This is perfect for anyone wanting to practice prepping as the Windom shale that most of these bits are in is relatively easy to work and there are lots of attractive pieces that will look very nice prepped, just aren't worth the time and effort for me at this point. Cheers!
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