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Found 60 results

  1. Horn Coral with?

    What is the net like pattern that sticks-out on the inside and outside of a silicified Pennsylvanian horn coral from NW of Payson, Arizona? Could it be an epibont-sponge? Could it be silica that filled cracks in part of the coral that was not silicified and eroded away? The coral opening is about 2.5 inches across.
  2. south jersey beach find

    Just got a metal detactor and thought would give the beach a try near us in south jersey....well after finding some pocket change the wifey did better then me with finding this nice little piece of horn coral......:) I found one last week on this beach but not as nice as hers
  3. Polished Horn coral 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Polished Horn Coral fossils SITE LOCATION: Western Sahara, Morocco TIME PERIOD: Devonian age (358-416 million years ago) Data: Horn Corals are from the extinct order of corals called Rugosa. Rugose means wrinkled. The outside of these corals have a wrinkled appearance. Horn Coral grows in a long cone shape like a bull’s horn. The fossil is the skeleton of the coral animal or polyp. They built these cone shaped structures from calcium carbonate that came from the ocean water. The animal lived at the top of the cone. As the animal got bigger it added more material to the cone. Each layer was a little bigger than the previous one. All corals belong to the phylum of animals called cnidaria. They are related to jellyfish which are also cnidaria. While modern corals are colonial the now extinct horn corals could be colonial or solitary animals. They had many tentacles sticking out to gather food. The tentacles gave them a flower like appearance. The oldest of the Rugosa corals are found in rocks from the Ordovician Period. Many species evolved during the Paleozoic Era. As a group they flourished until the Permian Period when they became extinct along with most living things during the Great Permian Extinction. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Order: †Rugosa
  4. Polished Horn coral 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Polished Horn Coral fossils SITE LOCATION: Western Sahara, Morocco TIME PERIOD: Devonian age (358-416 million years ago) Data: Horn Corals are from the extinct order of corals called Rugosa. Rugose means wrinkled. The outside of these corals have a wrinkled appearance. Horn Coral grows in a long cone shape like a bull’s horn. The fossil is the skeleton of the coral animal or polyp. They built these cone shaped structures from calcium carbonate that came from the ocean water. The animal lived at the top of the cone. As the animal got bigger it added more material to the cone. Each layer was a little bigger than the previous one. All corals belong to the phylum of animals called cnidaria. They are related to jellyfish which are also cnidaria. While modern corals are colonial the now extinct horn corals could be colonial or solitary animals. They had many tentacles sticking out to gather food. The tentacles gave them a flower like appearance. The oldest of the Rugosa corals are found in rocks from the Ordovician Period. Many species evolved during the Paleozoic Era. As a group they flourished until the Permian Period when they became extinct along with most living things during the Great Permian Extinction. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Order: †Rugosa
  5. Horn Coral Group.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Horn Coral SITE LOCATION: Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 yrs old) Horn Corals are from the extinct order of corals called Rugosa. Rugose means wrinkled. The outside of these corals have a wrinkled appearance. Horn Coral grows in a long cone shape like a bull’s horn. The fossil is the skeleton of the coral animal or polyp. They built these cone shaped structures from calcium carbonate that came from the ocean water. The animal lived at the top of the cone. As the animal got bigger it added more material to the cone. Each layer was a little bigger than the previous one. All corals belong to the phylum of animals called cnidaria. They are related to jellyfish which are also cnidaria. While modern corals are colonial the now extinct horn corals could be colonial or solitary animals. They had many tentacles sticking out to gather food. The tentacles gave them a flower like appearance. The oldest of the Rugosa corals are found in rocks from the Ordovician Period. Many species evolved during the Paleozoic Era. As a group they flourished until the Permian Period when they became extinct along with most living things during the Great Permian Extinction. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Order: †Rugosa
  6. Brachiopod or Horn Coral

    A friend of mine found an interesting fossil a Keifer Creek in St.Louis Missouri. He was unsure of what it was but I assumed that it was a horn coral or perhaps a vertically split brachiopod. I am not the best at identifying fossils so I was hoping someone on the forum with more experience could take a look at it. The fossil being referred to is in the middle of the stone.
  7. Vienna, Illinois Roadcut

    After making a stop at the Anna Roadcut, I drove about 15 minutes to Vienna, Illinois where there is a roadcut at the entrance to Interstate 24. This rock is supposed to Be Mississippian Menard Limestone. At this location I also found some nice hash plates, my biggest blastoid of the day, Horn coral, Archimedes’ screw, bryozoan and brachiopods.
  8. My Fossil Finds.

    Some of the coral I picked up, with close up view of septum.
  9. Horn Coral

    Checked out a spot I hadn't been back to since moving back. Found several lenses of fossils but the siltstone is so fragile that it crumbles to nothing. There is one layer of harder stone but it is impossible to climb up to. This chunk had tumbled down and gave me my find for the day - a nicely partially weathered out solitary horn coral. Devonian, Brallier Formation from near Roaring Spring PA.
  10. Horn Coral in NW NJ

    Found this horn coral on Trilobite Ridge in the NW corner of NJ this past weekend. The 2nd picture is the back side of rock. Is it possible to identify the species with these pictures? Thanks, Mike
  11. I like to look for rocks in Tennessee (almost the Kentucky Border). This one I picked up thinking it was horn coral, but I do not see the normal markings on horn coral. I have never seen the "curl" on the end of any rock look this. Possible shell? Curious what everyone thought.
  12. Fossil Ore Finds

    Friday I returned to one of my favorite spots that soon will be developed over. Its for sale and I wish I could buy it. These are from the [Silurian] Clinton Group, Keefer Formation - locally called the Upper Frankstown Ore Bed. The white is calcite material. The red "iron ore" is somewhat pisolitic and some fossils are filled/replaced with specular Hematite. (which doesn't photograph well.) If anyone has any idea what the big flat "Scallop like shell"{414C. 414D} is I'd be interested in hearing. I enjoy the level of detail that is sometimes preserved.
  13. To begin with I am not an Ordovician collector, but after seeing recent posts from other FF members, I decided to stop at the St. Leon and Lawrenceburg road cuts in Southern Indiana as I was making my way to North Carolina. I will post picks without specific ids, I know I have bryozoans, brachiopods, horn corals- but no trilobites. I did find 3 things that look to me to be possible Cephalopods, but could be mistaken. I also found 1 other item that I have no clue to its I'd. Any help with these last 4 items would be appreciated.
  14. Help me ID this "rock"

    I found this many years ago as a child on a beach, either in Florida or North/South Carolina, but I'm not 100% certain. I always assumed it was maybe fossilized poop of some sort, or maybe even fossilized coral. The "rock" is very dense, can scratch almost anything(note glass), and is maybe .5-2lbs. I have dropped it onto concrete from approx. 3-5ft, and it chipped the concrete, and I at least noticed no changes to the "rock". No odor, not even when I originally found it. Non-magnetic. One Side of this "rock" appears to have a crystal-like structure/pattern, but going from the center to the outside. I've included pics: https://i.imgur.com/hmglsiL.jpg https://i.imgur.com/v0KFYv4.jpg https://i.imgur.com/dTiw952.jpg https://i.imgur.com/3QZqrfJ.jpg https://i.imgur.com/iJqIBYM.jpg https://i.imgur.com/SP3ykwU.jpg https://i.imgur.com/UWibNML.jpg https://i.imgur.com/Ory9WDp.jpg Yeah, after about a week of researching I'm thinking(like 85-95% sure) it's a Fossilized(?) Horn Rugose Coral. Looks very much like these pics on this page: http://woostergeologists.scotblogs.wooster.edu/2015/10/09/woosters-fossils-of-the-week-a-rugose-coral-and-its-encrusters-from-the-middle-devonian-of-new-york/ and it also looks very familiar to these/this pic(s): http://woostergeologists.scotblogs.wooster.edu/files/2015/08/3-Wanakah-corals.jpg The one pic I included( https://i.imgur.com/v0KFYv4.jpg) looks like calcite crystals I am also curious how old this item may be, and I think it's app. from the Ordovician to Late Permian era, so maybe 485.4–443.8 million years to 298.9–252.17 million years old. Any help is greatly appreciated, and thanks in advance!
  15. Penn Dixie Site - May 2016

    Here is a smattering of my finds from May 2016 up until last week! Good season already! I don't own an air eraser yet so I haven't done any detail prep work on anything yet. Small enrolled Eldredgeops
  16. Rugosa?

    I broke this out of a very hard chunk of Osagean limestone from Lawrence County, MO. The top disintegrated, unfortunately. There was a hole in the rock about the size of a penny, which allowed my daughter to spot the fossil. But that meant it wasn't protected from weathering, and as a result parts of the top were the consistency of rust when we found it. It appeared that the septa originally converged to a nice point. Is this rugosa? And if so, what type?
  17. I've been going through the fossils I collected over the summer, trying to identify them. I have a lot of horn corals, several of which look like they could be either Streptelasma ungula or Stereolasma rectum: Several of them have matrix filling the calyx and obscuring the detail. With or without that, though, I don't know how to tell them apart! Except that my fossil guide lists Stereolasma as potentially being a little larger. This only rules out a couple of my specimens, though. Can anyone tell me what the diagnostic features of both species are?
  18. Horn Coral 2b (Kueichouphyllum sinense)

    From the album Ancient Invertebrates

    326.4 - 318.1 mya Guangxi Province, China
  19. Horn Coral 2a (Kueichouphyllum sinense)

    From the album Ancient Invertebrates

    326.4 - 318.1 mya Guangxi Province, China
  20. Horn Coral (Kueichouphyllum sinense)

    From the album Ancient Invertebrates

    326.4 - 318.1 mya Guangxi Province, China
  21. Eocene Horn Coral (Rugose Coral)

    From the album Copenhagen, Louisiana finds

    smaller rugose coral found in creek bed in the Copenhagen, Louisiana community

    © &copy

  22. From the album Copenhagen, Louisiana finds

    was informed per forum that this is a Eocene Rugose Coral (Horn Coral) with Predation borings. Found in a creek bed in the Copenhagen, Louisiana community

    © &copy

  23. From the album Copenhagen, Louisiana finds

    was informed per forum that this is a Eocene Rugose Coral (Horn Coral) with Predation borings. Found in a creek bed in the Copenhagen, Louisiana community

    © &copy

  24. From the album Copenhagen, Louisiana finds

    was informed per forum that this is a Eocene Rugose Coral (Horn Coral) with Predation borings. Found in a creek bed in the Copenhagen, Louisiana community.

    © &copy

  25. Petrified Mushroom, Horn Coral, Or...?

    I found this on the shore of a lake. At first I thought it was a petrified mushroom. It looks very similar to a mushroom. But, someone mentioned it could possibly be a horn coral. I really have no fossil knowledge so I'm just interested in what this possibly could be. It's very cool looking.
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