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Found 125 results

  1. Here's one I ran across the other day, Simply put, this is one of the most aesthetically attractive fossil insects preserved on shale I have ever seen. A practically perfect specimen in superb condition. And excellently photographed by a museum technician. It's from what they're calling the Miocene Savage Canyon Formation, Nevada. Some quick research disclosed that, unfortunately, it's from a locality that is no longer accessible to the general public. Somebody more experienced with matters entomological will perhaps recognize just what exactly the bug is: R E L A X, folks--I fully understand that technically speaking it's not a true bug, of course. Looks dipteran, obviously. The photograph is from a web page over at http://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?enlarge=0000+0000+1215+1242 .
  2. Insect Antenna or Plant Fragment?

    Hi all, I noticed this weird little object on a rock in my collection from the famous Talbragar Fish Beds (late Jurassic of Australia) and I was wondering whether it might be a feathery insect antenna or just a small bit of plant. Both plants (conifers and ferns mostly) and rare insects are known from the site. It measures only 5 mm long and I have done a quick drawing of it to show the form easier. Note the double branching tips on the lower filaments. Cheers!
  3. Insect wing?

    Hi. I found this in South Yorkshire, UK in the Pennine Middle Coal Measures formation (upper Carboniferous.) Is it part of an insect wing or just a plant? I think it may be the negative half of the fossil though I'm not sure. Thanks, Daniel
  4. Insect non det.

    From the album Invertebrates

    Insect non det. Middle Jurassic Daohugou Nei Mongol China
  5. Insect non det.

    From the album Invertebrates

    Insect non det. (Mecoptera or Scorpionfly?) Middle Jurassic Daohugou Nei Mongol China
  6. worm takeaway

    Some of you may have heard of Boucot's compendium of fossil behaviour. This could/should be in there,if it isn't already ulrichfausectB50H12S5.PDF
  7. How to polish amber?

    Hello, New to this forum. I recently have developed an interest in fossil inclusions in amber. After buying a number of prepared pieces, I decided I would like to try my hand at polishing some of my own. I found myself the owner of several hundred pieces of Dominican amber with inclusions. I have been doing a wet sand, and feel like I am close, but the pieces just don't seem to be getting a nice clear transparent finish. Any tips for finishing? I attached a few photos, the piece with the winged ants is from my collection and was polished by someone else, just for contrast with the one I was working on. I have a few pieces that look like they may have rarer inclusions (one looks like an earwig), so I am hoping to perfect the technique on a few more common pieces before I try my better ones. Thank you! Nathan
  8. Insect non det.

    From the album Invertebrates

    Insect non det. Mecoptera? Middle Jurassic Jiulongshan Formation Chifeng Province Nei Mongol PR China
  9. Insect non det.

    From the album Invertebrates

    Insect non det. Middle Jurassic Jiulongshan Formation Chifeng Province Nei Mongol PR China
  10. Insect non det.

    From the album Invertebrates

    Insect non det. Middle Jurassic Jiulongshan Formation Chifeng Province Nei Mongol PR China
  11. Cicadomorpha non det.

    From the album Invertebrates

    Cicadomorpha non det. Anthoscytina sp? Middle Jurassic Jiulongshan Formation Chifeng Province Nei Mongol PR China
  12. 'Alien' insect in amber prompts scientists to add whole new branch to family tree. This bizarre bug is so unusual, entomologists say it belongs in its own, entirely new, order of insects. Christian Science Monitor, Jan. 27, 2017 http://www.csmonitor.com/Science/2017/0127/Alien-insect-in-amber-prompts-scientists-to-add-whole-new-branch-to-family-tree Ancient, scary and alien-looking specimen forms a rarity in the insect world – a new order. Oregon State University http://oregonstate.edu/ua/ncs/archives/2017/jan/ancient-scary-and-alien-looking-specimen-forms-rarity-insect-world-–-new-order https://www.flickr.com/photos/oregonstateuniversity/32520806205/ The paper is: Poinar, G. and Brown, A.E., 2016. An exotic insect Aethiocarenus burmanicus gen. et sp. nov.(Aethiocarenodea ord. nov., Aethiocarenidae fam. nov.) from mid-Cretaceous Myanmar amber. Cretaceous Research. Volume 72, April 2017, Pages 100–104 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0195667116302506 Yours, Paul H.
  13. Hi all! I am looking for fossil insects for trade. Any location is fine, and basically any insect is fine! I would prefer whole or nearly whole specimens though. If you have any for trade (except for Ephemeroptera or insects in amber; those are the only two I already have.), please PM me! Europe shipping preferred, but worldwide is fine too. In return, I have many different things (sharkteeth, ray teeth, fish teeth, bivalves, coral, etc.), so in your PM just say what you are looking for in return. Best regards and happy hunting! Max
  14. From the album Green River Formation. Parachute Creek Member. Douglas Pass, Colorado

    Unidentified insect from the Green River Formation. Parachute Creek Member. Douglas Pass, Colorado. Radar Dome location. 5/8" across.
  15. Green River Insect?

    Need help identifying this fossil. Green River formation. Parachute Creek member. Douglas Pass, Colorado. Radar Dome location. The specimen is 5/8" across. This is the best I can do for a photograph until I can get a macro lens. (or learn how to take better photos) I have tried many different settings and lighting, but I can't seem to get a better photo. Thank you for your help.
  16. Just wondering if someone could help ID this fossil. It is part of a large stone (10 pounds) with many of these on the stone.
  17. Please help identify this insect in amber

    Can anyone please help identify this insect? According to the label, the amber is from the Dominican Republic, dated to the Oligocene. Right now I'm guessing this is a black scavenger fly. Thanks in advance.
  18. Hello everyone! Sorry for again asking your help, but hereby I have some fossils I would like to identify. The reason I put them together in one topic is because I bought them all from the same shop. They have all been purchased the same day at the same location (shop in London). For most of them I do not know where they come from nor the age. Fossil #1: Fossil insect (Liaoning, China; Early Cretaceous) ---> note on back "stone fly [...]" ? Fossil #2: Fossil nautilus (Southern France???) Fossil #3: Fossil ammonite (could be Cleoniceras?) Fossil #4: Fossil sea-shell, gastropod If you want to know how much I bought them for, just ask me in the replies (£). Thank you already for your help! Max
  19. Unusual California Land Fossils!

    Greetings everyone. I am from Northern California. All of the mineral specimens and fossils that I dig up come from the same general area. But it is a complex geological zone, where the Sierra Nevada, the Cascades, the Modoc plateau, and the Basin and Range all sort of come together. I'm going to be posting a series of sets of photos for your enjoyment, but primarily for my education.. I'm hoping to get some help identifying as many fossils in these photos as possible.. I figured I would start with some challenging ones. This first set of photos shows what I am ninety-nine percent sure are land living organisms ( the reason I know this is because I find Leaf fossils in the same Rock ( I'll be posting pictures of those in another set of photos). For size reference, the black objects in these photos are not very large ranging between centimeter or two 2 an inch or so in length... The host rock is a silica-rich jasper-like material that has a hardness of 7 and breaks with a conchoidal fracture. I'm looking forward to hearing what you all think about these. Thanks for your time!
  20. http://phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2016/06/24/100-million-years-of-decorating-yourself-in-junk/?utm_source=Facebook&utm_medium=Social&utm_content=link_fb20160925ph-bugsinjunk&utm_campaign=Content&sf36857324=1
  21. True Bug

    True bugs are scarce in this deposit. In fact this is the only one I found.
  22. Larvae.JPG

    From the album Green River Formation. Parachute Creek Member. Douglas Pass, Colorado

    Larvae from Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation. Douglas Pass, Colorado.
  23. Hello again to everyone on the forum and can't wait to learn from you. I just joined this week and this will be my first main post. I have always been very interested in fossils and geology and finally went on an official fossil Hunting trip this past week. I went with my family the first time and we scouted out the area. I did a lot of research beforehand and read that Pit 11 was one of the most popular concretion hunting spots at Mazon, but that also means they are harder to find. After more research, I decided we should check out an area to the south called the Mazonia South Unit. I read that this area had been less collected because there is much thicker vegetation. The vegetation was very thick. We hiked for a couple miles into the Forested area and we came to the bottom of a large hill. Me and my brother scaled the cliff and saw a way down the other side. The bottom of the other side of the cliff ended right into a river. After we made it to the bottom, my father found the first fossil, a small leaf, in an open concretion. We then saw concretions everywhere around us and started collecting. We only stayed for about an hour that day because the mosquitoes were relentless. I got home and saw I had some fossils and got so excited, I went back out there by myself the very next day. I scaled the cliffs up and down and got as many concretions as I could. Not satisfied, I just came back from another trip out to Mazon yesterday. I'm still refining my technique, but I spent most of the time going up and down the cliff sides looking and picking for concretions. I had a geologic pick, and a bag as my main tools. The first couple times, I picked everything I saw. After more research, I was more picky yesterday and did a lot of cracking in the field. I am not done processing all my concretions but I will post what I have found so far. Please let me know if you can help identify any of them and if the pictures are good for your viewing. Any general tips for fossil hunting and anything is also welcome I have more than I can post in this one post, but will follow up post with rest of my current photos.
  24. Pupating Butterfly In Baltic Amber!

    Hello, I am new to this forum. I'm an evolutionary ecologist, and used to working on living organisms, but this is so well-preserved it might as well be alive! What I'm nearly sure you're looking at is a fossilized pupating butterfly (chrysalis). You can see the silk lines it attached to the leaf, as well as much of the leaf itself. This would be what one would call a "pre-pupa", but it's already starting to look very chrysalis-ish. It certainly looks papilionid, perhaps lycaenid based on size and morphology? What strikes me is both the rarity and incredible beauty of this find if it is what I think it is. Any thoughts?? Is this the only chrysalis known in the fossil record? It's from Baltic amber, straight from the mines to an collector's hands (and now my own.) Looking forward to replies.
  25. Insects from Liaoning, China

    From the album Fossildude's Purchased/Gift Fossils

    Some insects from Liaoning China. A nymph of a Mayfly? (Ephemeroptera) perhaps. Also, a backswimmer (water boatman)- unnoticed by me until received. One unidentified possible insect, and multiple conchostrachans. From the Early Cretaceous. Yixian Formation, Huangbangi Valley Beipiao, Liaoning Province of China.

    © © 2016 Tim Jones

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