Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'isle of wight'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 103 results

  1. Dinosaur Rib Fragment (found 2017)

    From the album Fossils From Compton Bay to Grange Chine, Isle of Wight

    Collected at Chilton Chine on the Isle of Wight, UK. Wessex Formation. About 125-130 Ma.
  2. Rolled Dinosaur Bone (found 2017)

    From the album Fossils From Compton Bay to Grange Chine, Isle of Wight

    Collected at Hanover Point on the Isle of Wight, UK. Wessex Formation. About 125-130 Ma.
  3. Rolled Dinosaur Bone (found 2017)

    From the album Fossils From Compton Bay to Grange Chine, Isle of Wight

    Collected between Grange Chine and Chilton Chine on the Isle of Wight, UK. Wessex Formation. About 125-130 Ma.
  4. Rolled Dinosaur Bone (found 2017)

    From the album Fossils From Compton Bay to Grange Chine, Isle of Wight

    Collected between Grange Chine and Chilton Chine on the Isle of Wight, UK. Wessex Formation. About 125-130 Ma.
  5. Rolled Dinosaur Bone (found 2017)

    From the album Fossils From Compton Bay to Grange Chine, Isle of Wight

    Collected between Grange Chine and Chilton Chine on the Isle of Wight, UK. Wessex Formation. About 125-130 Ma.
  6. Rolled Dinosaur Bone (found 2017)

    From the album Fossils From Compton Bay to Grange Chine, Isle of Wight

    Collected between Grange Chine and Chilton Chine on the Isle of Wight, UK. Wessex Formation. About 125-130 Ma.
  7. Rolled Dinosaur Bone (found 2015)

    From the album Fossils From Compton Bay to Grange Chine, Isle of Wight

    Collected between Brook Chine and Chilton Chine on the Isle of Wight, UK. Wessex Formation. About 125-130 Ma.
  8. Rolled Dinosaur Bone (found 2015)

    From the album Fossils From Compton Bay to Grange Chine, Isle of Wight

    Collected between Brook Chine and Chilton Chine on the Isle of Wight, UK. Wessex Formation. About 125-130 Ma.
  9. Rolled Dinosaur Bone (found 2017)

    From the album Fossils From Compton Bay to Grange Chine, Isle of Wight

    Collected between Grange Chine and Chilton Chine on the Isle of Wight, UK. Wessex Formation. About 125-130 Ma.
  10. Isle of Wight, Hamstead

    I recently spent a week on the Isle of Wight, mostly to find fossils. To be honest, the fossils were pretty much a washout for me in many respects. My inexperience, combined with very mild weather and calm seas, meant that I didn't find the dinosaur bone I'd been hoping for. I made much better finds in the local book and charity shops! I did recover some huge pieces of lignite, which seemed to litter every beach I found. This even included some huge logs. I have successfully preserved lignite from other locations, but this stuff is quite pyritic. However, I'm happy to say that I was quite fortunate when hunting in the Oligocene beds of Hamstead. This beach is not easy to access - it's difficult to find a means down to the beach, and when you find it, you have to jump down a bank, walk over loads of broken glass, climb over fallen trees and crawl beneath others, and walk in worryingly sticky mud. However, it is worth it! I didn't find a huge amount, but I was fortunate enough to come across these two associated scutes from the alligator Diplocynodon (identified by the very helpful people at Dinosaur Isle). I also found about a dozen pieces of emys turtle shell, these are three of the best. This piece of bone was identified by a chap at Dinosaur Isle as most likely a piece of mammal skull. I didn't get an ID on this - any suggestions would be welcome. It's 1.5cm tall. This is also unidentified, and I'm not certain whether it's a fossil or not. It's 2.5cm long.
  11. IOW indet. crocodile remains

    Thought some might want to see this paper It's a description of a set of indeterminate tethysuchian remains; from the Lower Cretaceous of the Isle of Wight. 2014 Young et al. IoW tethysuchian.pdf @Natalie81 @Birdman @Manticocerasman -Christian
  12. Found on the shoreline in shanklin on the Isle of Wight, UK. Local fossil hunter told me that whilst dinosaur bones are rare, marine reptiles are more common because of the shoreline geology. Found in lower greensand (Cretaceous) deposits. Photograph is difficult to capture the unusual shape - I really have very little clue as to what it could be, I'd be amazed if any detailed identification was possible but would be nice to find out what it vaguely is, even if it's absolutely nothing! The shape definitely strikes me as some kind of joint that has maybe been fractured a long time ago and weathered? Any input would be greatly appreciated!
  13. Can anyone identify this?

    I found these two similar looking rocks when on the Isle Of Wight visiting Yaverland Beach, Sandown. I don’t know what they are or if they are even fossils, any help or identification of what these might be is appreciated, thanks
  14. Neovenator tooth from Isle of Wight?

    A seller has offered me this Neovenator tooth Isle of Wight. The tooth is 41mm long and is missing the tip, but the surface of the tooth looks nice. The seller is a British seller who owns a fossil website and has sold Iguanadon, another Neovenator and megalosaurus sp? tooth in the past. Please could you let me know your thoughts on this tooth and if the ID might be correct?
  15. Hi, I've just got back from one of my collecting trips to Bouldnor Cliff and picked up an odd mammal tooth crown that I was hoping I may be able to get some help with. The specimen constitutes part of the crown and the roots of an as of yet unidentified tooth (possibly molar?). What struck me about it upon picking it up is that the morphology of the tooth and it's roots do not resemble the usual (and common) dental material from Bothriodont anthracotheres which constitute the vast majority of mammal finds from the upper Hamstead Mbr. I've compared it to the Bothriodon teeth and jaws in my collection and can't find a match with either upper, lower or anterior dentition. The specimen (although partial) is also considerably bigger than the anthracothere teeth, so all in all I feel fairly secure in eliminating them as a possibility. I was wondering if it's possible this may be a piece of entelodont tooth. The Entelodontidae are represented in the upper Hamstead Mbr. by Entelodon magnum, although the material is restricted to isolated teeth and very rare. Unfortunately the occlusal surface is missing which makes it impossible to determine whether the tooth was bunodont or not, however the crown does seem to be quite "bulbous" at it's boundary with the roots, which is a feature I've seen in some entelodont teeth before. That said I don't want to rush to conclusions. If anyone has an experience with entelodont teeth or material and is able to help it would be much appreciated, as this would be a particularly exciting find! Thank you, Theo 1. Lateral view showing contact between crown and roots 2. Lateral view showing the surface where the tooth has been broken revealing inner dentine 3. Occlusal view 4. View of the partial roots on the underside of the specimen 4.
  16. Meyeria magna M'Coy, 1848

    From the album Invertebrates

    Meyeria magna M'Coy, 1848 Early Cretaceous Early Aptian Atherfield Clay Formation Atherfield Isle of Wight United Kingdom
  17. Dino foot cast

    A quick iPhoney pic of a foot cast while on The Isle of Wight whilst i had a couple off hours of work.
  18. Mantellisaurus bone

    Evening folks. Here’s a chunk of I’m sure is M. Atherfieldensis found at err Atherfield on The Isle of Wight during my trip there last week. I’m thinking bottom end of fibula but not sure. @Troodon @jpc @LordTrilobite
  19. I'm not sure what that is. I think it's a chiton, possibly of the genus Acanthopleura. Found in the Cretaceous (Lower Greensand) of Atherfield Point, Isle of Wight, England.
  20. Isle of Wight fossils

    My parents recently visited the Isle of Wight, an area known for a huge concentration of fossils into a pretty small area, and they were determined to find me some fossils. They came back dejected, saying that all they'd found were some worthless pebbles, but happily there were some fossils there. However, I've never been there and know nothing about the fossils that can be found there, so I'm posting here for some ID assistance. 1. This reminds me of calamites, but someone has said it could be part of an Iguanadon limb bone. 1b - end view of same. 2. Section of ammonite. I've never found a piece of ammonite quite like this before! 3. Just rocks, or rolled bone?
  21. Hi, I've just got back from a collecting trip up to Hamstead Ledge this afternoon and came across a fairly rare find that I was hoping someone may be able to help with. It's the distal tarsometatarsus of bird found ex-situ on the foreshore. Bird material from the Bouldnor Fm. tends to be quite rare and this is the first piece I've actually ever come across so was really excited to find it! I was wondering if there were any diagnostic features on the specimen that would be able to take the ID further than "Aves indet.". If anyone has any knowledge of bird material then I'd really appreciate their help (what I have noticed is the trochlea are fairly evenly spaced but didn't know if that indicated anything). Thank you, Theo The specimen measures 1.9cm in length and 1.5cm across at it's widest point.
  22. I was just prepping out a very small piece of bone I found down on the Isle of Wight a few months ago. It ended up looking very different from what I expected, so was hoping someone may be able to suggest what it could belong to. From my very limited experience it looks almost bird like, so was wondering if it could be pterosaur, which is found in this location. Early Cretaceous. Chilton chine. Isle of Wight. ..... the bone is hollow with relatively thin walls. Just over 1cm long. I’ve tried to get clear photos but they didn’t turn out too well so I’ve had to compensate by posting too many instead.
  23. Hi, It's been a while since I've put anything up on here so it figured it would a good time to share some of my finds from this spring so far. With such a productive winter the start of this spring on the Bouldnor Fm. coast was a bit slow with several trips in which little was found (odd for what is usually a heavily productive site) but as March and April came round the finds started coming in faster and better. Access at Bouldnor is now very dangerous and pretty much impassable due to thick and deep silt and mud which has covered part of the beach (which I found out the hard way trying to get through), along with two recent cliff falls which have brought several oak trees down onto the beach. Hamstead and Cranmore are as good as ever with a lot of the winter's mudflows now eroding away and making the foreshore a lot easier. (Hamstead Ledge on a spring low tide) Mammal finds have been pretty nice so far this spring, as usual all Bothriodon, and alongside them I've also made some nice alligator and turtle finds including two partial Emys in-situ in the Upper Hamstead Mbr. Here are some of the highlights: 1. More pieces of the large Bothriodon mandible I first found in January have turned up scattered over the same area. I now have part of the hinge, two sections with P2 - M3 and a part of the underside of the mandible from further forward. I regularly check the site on my collecting trips so hopefully yet more of the jaw will turn up. (The positions of the fragments may be slightly off in the image below but it gives a general idea) 2. Bothriodon caudal vertebra. This is one of my favourite finds from this spring. I was originally excavating a small micro-vertebrate site when I felt the tool make contact with a large bone, I dug a bit deeper into the clay and found this vertebra with the processes fragmented around it. Luckily with a bit of super glue the processes were easily reunited with the vertebral body, after 33 million years apart. Unfortunately I couldn't locate the other transverse process or neural spine in the matrix nearby so I think they may have been broken off on the Oligocene coastal plain. 3. Bothriodon upper molar in a fragment of maxilla 4. Section of Bothriodon mandible with a nice mental foramen. Unfortunately no in-situ teeth with this one. 5. Section of mammalian limb bone with evidence of rodent gnawing. This was an in-situ find eroding out of the Upper Hamstead Mbr. on the foreshore. Gnaw marks like these are really common on in-situ material especially on limb bones. I don't think the rodents were scavenging the flesh off the bones, more likely they were extracting calcium and phosphate or were simply using it to grind down their continually growing incisors. Either way it shows that for at least a period a lot of these bones were exposed to the elements and accessible to the variety of rodents present on the coastal plain. 6. Nice quality Bothriodon intermedial phalange 7. Large Diplocynodon alligator frontal bone Thanks for reading, and I hope you enjoyed the finds! Theo
  24. Vertebra, possibly Neovenator?

    In a general pm chat with @Haravex I showed him some Isle of Wight vertebrae. With this one Matt wasn’t convinced that I was right on my ID which I was leaning towards juvenile iggy. Now looking at it I agree with him. Let’s get a few more opinions. Brook Bay, Isle of Wight, Lower Cretaceous, Wessex Formation
×