Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'jurassic'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • blogs_blog_99
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Books I have enjoyed
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101
  • Ever put a foot in your mouth

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

  1. Hi, just wanted to show you prep of a quite nice preserved Lacunosella cracoviensis - endemic specie of my Jurassic area prepped with a Engraver and a little bit of vinegar for surface cleaning. Started as a 20 pounds chunk
  2. Ludwigia

    Palaeophycus striatus (Hall 1852)

    From the album: Trace Fossils

    7cm. long. Polychaetic worm feeding burrow. Middle Jurassic. Found in the Wutach Valley.
  3. Benifossil2021

    What species of Ammonita is it?

    Hello everybody: I recently got this nice specimen of Ammonita from Northern Morocco. I am not so sure about the identity, but my guess is that is Hildoceras sp. I wonder if anyone might be inclined to help me to get a proper identification. The person who got it, back in 1995, told me that the specimen is from the Jurassic, but he was not able to provide me a specific name. Perhaps Hildoceras laticosta? Thank you in advance, Best regards, Benifossil2021
  4. I was in the Wutach area again. A couple of weeks ago I posted a report about my adventures in the Aubach, and today I decided to scramble up the Krottenbach in the hopes of finding some Jurassic fossils. This creek isn't quite as wild as the Aubach, so I managed within 5 hours to move upstream to the point I was hoping to reach, despite the odd tree dam blocking the way. There were 2 huge landslides which inundated the area about 60 years ago and brought down a lot of detritus from the Middle Jurassic in the cliffs on both sides of the valley, so even tho
  5. IsaacTheFossilMan

    Crinoid(?) from the Cotswolds, UK.

    I was just milling about, splitting Cotswold stone, when this caught my eye. In my swimming seas of gastropods, echinoids, crinoids, brachiopods, and bivalves, I've never come across anything like this! If anyone could shed some light, I would be much obliged. Early Oxfordian in ages, found in the Ancholme group. Around it were these fragmented plates of molluscs. It looks like a crushed stem of perhaps a crinoid? If it requires better photos, I can crack out the old camera and take a few! Cheers, Isaac
  6. Microraptorfan

    Jurassic Gar

    Hi I came across this while searching for gar fossils, it allegedly represents a Jurassic gar, which is significant. I enquired about it's current whereabouts from the site owner, but they said it was sold about 10-15 years ago. This is a shot in the dark but I was wondering if anyone here might know of it's current whereabouts? It's from the Jurassic of the Twin Creek Formation of Utah.
  7. dhiggi

    Whitby area reptile bones

    Daughter and I had a walk in the Whitby area this morning, didn’t come away with much but these two little chunks of bone made the trip worthwhile. The larger one (pics 3-6) appears to have ribs no more than about 5mm in diameter along with a lot of other bones. The smaller one (pics 1,2,7,8) looks to have two or three partial verts, but I can’t see if the centres are concave like ichthyosaur and to me they look too flat to be ples/croc. Can anyone shed any light on either piece? Thank you for looking
  8. Tidgy's Dad

    Ifrane, Morocco.

    Hi, gang. Some of you may remember the Southern Morocco trip I took in February. One of the places visited was quite near to me, about 70 km, lovely Swiss style mountain town called Ifrane where I found some Middle Jurassic brachiopods and echinoids. See http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/93193-ifrane-middle-atlas-morocco/&tab=comments#comment-1026671 A friend offered to drive me up there for the day so off we went I decided to check some outcrops on the other side of the road this time so went and had a peek.Sorry, no photos this time as wifey did
  9. sjaak

    Unknown Jurassic Bone

    Hello all, I found this bone fragment many years ago. I'm afraid this will (as usual in this area) be a difficult one. This was found in the Boulonnais area in the North of France. Jurassic, marine sediments. This was a coastal area in the late Jurassic, so also rare dinosaur bones can be found. I included an in situ picture. Hidden in the rock was an ichtyosaurus vertebra. I therefore assumed this to be a piece of ichtyosaurus bone. However, I can not think of a bone in the Ichtyosaurus skeleton that fits. The bone has a kind of socket which, I guess, wa
  10. pachy-pleuro-whatnot-odon

    Marine reptiles of Madagascar

    Hi all, I recently became aware that Madagascar appears to have a fully developed and interesting Mesozoic marine reptile record, yet am not particularly able to find any information on them. The only article I have come across is Bardet and Termier, 1990, "Première description de restes de Plésiosaure provenant de Madagascar (gisement de Berere, Campanien)". However, I've been unable to track this article down. As such, I was wondering whether anybody on TFF might have any information on them. Basically, I'm starting from scratch, so would be very interested in the clades of
  11. Some of you may be wondering what and where the Aubach is, so first I'll explain (Of course @Everhardus already knows what I'm talking about, since he recently inspired me here to make the trip). The Aubach is a creek in the Wutach area whose undercut slopes expose in sections the entire Early Jurassic from the Hettangian to the Toarcian with even the Aalenian stage of the Middle Jurassic at the top. This is one of the very first exposures studied by the pioneering German Paleontologists and Geologists such as Quenstedt. Geology students from all over southern Germany visit this site to learn
  12. Found this today in the Whitby area, either a septarian nodule is playing a cruel, early April fools or it’s some kind of reptile bone. It’s roughly symmetrical with the circle shape on each side. Thanks for looking.
  13. Here is a lovely isolated theropod tooth from USA - the seller lacked all locality data, although he believed it may have been from the Morrisons formation. This lovely tooth is just over 2.5cm long and has 15 serrations per 5mm on the distal side (DC) however serrations on the mid-centre off the medial side have not been preserved. It would be lovely to ID this to some level other than theropod if possible. Serrations on the mesial side only go down 2/3rds of the tooth. There is some restoration to the tooth - if any more photos would be beneficial please let me kno
  14. oilshale

    Todiltia schoewei (Dunkle, 1942)

    Alternative combination: Leptolepis schoewei. Taxonomy taken from NMNH Catalog Number USNM V 17903. DIAGNOSIS after Schaeffer & Patterson (1984): "Middle Jurassic teleostean fishes of leptolepid grade, but differing from similar fishes in having only chordacentra until late in growth. The chordacentra receive perichordal additions only in the midcaudal region, and only in the largest specimens. About 50 vertebrae, 30 abdominal. Dorsal fin in the middle of the back with about 16 rays; anal originates beneath posterior edge of dorsal, with about 14 rays; pelvics beneath dorsal o
  15. Mantelliceras

    Big Ammonite Repair Adhesive

    Hello everyone! I managed to bring home this crazy guy, the problem is that it was so big it broke in pieces when extracting it. I've been using "Loctite Super Glue 3" (ethyl cyanoacrylate) for repairing my fossils until now and it worked pretty well. However, this one might be too heavy I'm afraid it wont be enough to keep the pieces together and it can be dangerous (since the whole fossil probably weights over 70 lbs). There are also some cracks I would like to fill, I heard a technique where you ground some matrix rock to dust and then use that powder to make a glue that has the e
  16. Mcmaker

    Mcmaker's showcase

    Hello everyone. I wanted to share with you my fossils collection. I started fossils hunting in my area back in the june 2019 and that's what I collected and preparated since then. First of all, my favourite belemnites. I donated one of the largest rostrum (7 intact inches, on the second photo) to the Jurassic Museum in my country, feels good So, let's get started, that's one of twelve full shelves, this one is especially for belemnites
  17. From the album: fish

    Leptolepis gregarious Woodward, 1895.Late Jurassic.Merrygoen Ironstone, Purlawaugh Formation. Farrs Hill, Uarbry. New South Wales.Australia
  18. Hey everyone! I'm currently looking for any teeth from the Oxford Clay, especially those of plesiosaurs and teleosauroid crocs. In exchange, I can offer a variety of crocodile teeth from the Jurassic Tiourarén Formation of Niger like (but not limited to) the ones below.
  19. I’ve been slightly obsessed for a long time now with finding a Whitby cannonball nodule good enough to put the hours of prep work into. I have given up while trying to split many, I have split a lot of empty ones, I have chipped a load while trying to split them. I do have a nice eliganticeras nodule that could potentially polish up but the shape just doesn’t lend itself. I found this at the weekend at Runswick Bay and while it would have been nice to have a split nodule with the positive and negative, I could see the potential in this. The actual ammonite is just a crushed up pyritey me
  20. Von Mayer originally described this chimaera under the name Ischyodus avitus. Elasmodectes avitus, a cartilaginous fish, is conspicuous for its sparsely ossified skeleton. There is a nuchal spine behind the head; the dorsal fin begins just behind the nuchal spine and extends to the tail. Elasmodectes seems to have possessed a skin or only very thin scales, which seems to be almost impossible to preserve. The Skull is presenting its dosal view. Reverence: WOODWARD, A.S. (1891) Catalogue of the fossil fishes in the British Museum (Natural History). Part II. containing
  21. Hello, i have this little piece of fossil (2-3 cm) that i have no idea what it can be. Its from falaises des vaches noires in France which is Cretaceous/Jurassic area. There are mostly marine fossiles here. I was thinking fishbone fragment or plant? If anyone could help me i would really appreciate it.
  22. Hello everybody! In continuation of the Frozen Fossils and Frozen Fossils II topics this report covers fossil hunting in real winter, with excavating fossils from under the snow (@JamieLynn might be interested). The trips took place this week when we had a thaw with temperatures raising to +1-2 Celsius after a long period of frost (so that digging became possible). This time I visited the same site as in FF2, which is MUCH poorer than the one covered in FF1, but MIGHT yield more diverse fossils (which was unfortunately not the case).
  23. Belemnites have been my core interest for decades, starting as an 8 year old kid when I saw and bought the pointy end of a large Cylindroteuthis in a curio shop (I still have it ). This led eventually to being able to research some Lower Jurassic ones for my Ph.D at university. I pursued another career after that (musical instrument repair and restoration) but palaeontology has remained a fairly fanatical interest ever since. Most of my early collection (including nearly all the research stuff) has been lost for various reasons but I've been able to replace much of it and added many new
  24. oilshale

    Agathis jurassica White, 1981

    One of the common coniferous plant fossils found at the Talbragar site is Agathis jurassica. The genus Agathis is extant, representing a small group of some 21 species mainly distributed in Australasia, belonging to the same family (Araucariaceae) as Wollemia. Together with a fishtail. Key references: White. M.E., 1981a. Fish beds reveal lush fossil forest. Australian Natural History 20 (7), 227-230. White. M.E., 1981b. Revision of the Talbragar Fish Bed Flora (Jurassic) of New South Wales. Records of the Australian Museum 33 (15), 695-721. Woodward,
×
×
  • Create New...