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  1. DatFossilBoy

    Mystery dino fossil?

    Hey Guys, I was offered this piece from the Atlas Mountains in Morocco, which have Jurassic deposits. I’m not sure what it could be… a sauropod scute maybe? No idea. What do you guys think? Regards
  2. Hello everyone. I offer interesting gastropods with calcite crystals - perhaps someone will be interested I have a lot of them. Pseudomorphoses of calcite after gastropod shells of the genus Nerinea from Upper Jurassic limestones of the Oxfordian stage (Izyum Formation J2-3iz); 163,5 mln years. Ukraine, Donetsk region. I'm interested in everything - I invite you to private messages Have a nice day VID_20220122_135535.mp4 VID_20220122_135732.mp4
  3. Taxonomy from Mindat.org. Diagnosis from Enay and Hess 1962, p. 662 (translated from french by oilshale): "Small species. Disc granulated on both sides (radial shields included), the granules hiding small imbricate plates. Radial shields and plates articulated by means of two condyles and a facet carried by both the radial shield and the corresponding plate. Radial shields of moderate width, those of the same radius not touching. Ambulacral parts of oral plates or jaws (= oral frames of Matsumoto) without wings. Double peristomal plates. About 6 contiguous oral papillae on each side. Prob
  4. paleoflor

    Araucaria mirabilis

    Old collection specimen. See this Wikipedia page for more information on Araucaria mirabilis from the Jurassic of the Cerro Cuadrado Petrified Forest, Argentina.
  5. I convinced my friend in England to send me some matrix from the Oxford Clay site I have the pleasure of hunting a few years ago. I really wanted to see what I could find in the micro stuff! He packed up a "Fosters sized package of Pay Dirt" as he referred to it and I got it in the mail a couple of weeks ago. It didn't take me long to go through it because I just couldn't stop! So many beautiful tiny fossils!! Star Crinoids, Belemnites, Ammonites, all of those I expected to find. What I was surprised to find was lots of tiny crab claws, couple of shark teeth and some possible Starfish ossicles
  6. Belemnites have been my core interest for decades, starting as an 8 year old kid when I saw and bought the pointy end of a large Cylindroteuthis in a curio shop (I still have it ). This led eventually to being able to research some Lower Jurassic ones for my Ph.D at university. I pursued another career after that (musical instrument repair and restoration) but palaeontology has remained a fairly fanatical interest ever since. Most of my early collection (including nearly all the research stuff) has been lost for various reasons but I've been able to replace much of it and added many new
  7. On saturday I went on my first fossil hunting trip of 2021 with the BVP. Normally we would visit my favorite quarry "the Romontbos quarry" in Eben-Emael which is Maastrichtian in age, but due some complications that trip has been posponed till the end of September. Instead we went to the SETIM quarry in Tontelange in Belgian Luxembourg which was quite cool as it supposedly only the 2nd that this quarry allowed fossil hunting so everyone was quite excited. The rocks we hunted in this quarry are Jurassic in age, mainly Hettangian & Sinemurian. The lower levels of the quarr
  8. Hi everyone, I went fossil hunting on the Yorkshire Coast a few days ago and picked up plenty of Dactylioceras ammos but not much else. Among them are these two which both cracked after an exploratory 'tap' with the hammer. I have never glued broken ammonites together for prep before but have seen it spoken about a lot. I have a few questions about how to approach this. Firstly, do you think these specimens are viable? The other issue is that I only have a Dremel to prep with so even if I glue them back together there will be an awful lot of matrix to remove..
  9. Hi, found these at the samel spot, Hamachtesh Hagadol, Negev area, Israel. Jurassic. Both are about 25mm wide. I think they belong to the same species as the smooth one (left photo) was also found with some minor details resembling the right one. Any direction would be very appreciated. Many thanks in advance, Oz
  10. RuMert

    Sifting under snow

    Hi all! Answering @jpc's question about the site's accessibility in winter and if we actually dig under snow. Yes, we do! (something must be not right in the head). Today we tried the dig at -1C'. Had to make a pretty big hole too (the deepest I've seen there). No big teeth found, hopes for the micro-matrix.
  11. Hi everyone These two pieces were collected by my boyfriends father and his family about 60 years ago on the Jurassic coast of Charmouth/Lyme Regis. A little while ago he brought them out to show me and said I could keep the ones I liked. I chose these two, but not to keep. My idea was to prep them, reveal the fossils inside and give them to him at Christmas. I used a Dremel with specialised tips and a sewing needle in a pin vice under a microscope. Overall I'm quite happy with how they turned out, not perfect, but I can see my own improvement. The larger s
  12. Hi all! Here I describe how we sift for Late Jurassic fossils in Moscow Fili Park, in continuation of Fili Park evokes mixed feelings. In fact, now it is the main place for Jurassic fish and reptile teeth. Nowhere else in our Jurassic will you be able to say casually: "I'll go find some teeth", here it is possible. Even in Ulyanovsk, with all its skeletons and verts, teeth have to be searched for a very, very long time. For Muscovites, Fili Park is literally close at hand (for me, for example, it takes a little over half an hour to get there). In addition, Fili Park introduces hobb
  13. mr fossil

    Jurrasic Tooth?

    I found these fossils along with many corals in the desert not far from Riyadh Saudi arabia the region was jurrasic im not sure what this is could it be some sort of tooth or maybe a balemnite? the second image shows the whole rock if anyone has any idea please tell me thank you so much I appreciate it thank you for your time
  14. Hi all, A couple of years ago I acquired a lovely pair of plesiosaur propodial bones from Lyme Regis. It was a matched pair of both humerus and femur. Today, when I was looking to make space in my cabinet for a new acquisition I had made, I discovered some odd dust next to the humerus that, on inspection and to my horror turned out to be pyrite bloom! I immediately removed the specimen from the cabinet, checked the other podial and nearby fossils, and used a tooth brush to brush of the most direct traces of pyrite decay. But the question is: what now? How do I ensure the propodial's prese
  15. Scylla

    Ammonite Anatomy

    New fossil discovery shows details of amonite soft tissue anatomy. https://phys.org/news/2021-12-never-before-seen-ammonite-muscles-revealed-3d.html
  16. Can someone help me identify the species of the owner of this tooth? Thank you so much Information about it location:Lance creek, Wyoming Aged: Jurassic Size:0.35×0.36inch
  17. My Jurassic Park now heads across the pond to England and Germany. Dinosaur material from these countries is not common like North America and in fact very difficult to obtain. Theropod material is extremely rare and most remains are fragments. Most of my material from England comes from the coast of two areas The Isle of Wight and East Sussex. Material from these area comprises the Wealden Super Group (Hasting+Wealden+Weld Clay) and is early Cretaceous from the Valanginian to Barremian Stage (140-125mya). Yellow - Hasting Group , Green - Weald Clay Red - Wealden Grouip
  18. Last week I had the chance to go for a short fossil hunting trip to the area called the Polish Jura – famous for limestone formations, which take several fantastic shapes and have their very own names. Here are some instances: The camel The Hercules club The Trolls It’s also the area with numerous stone castles from the 14th and 15th century – the are located along the so-called Trail of the Eagle's Nests Here are some examples: But my main interest were
  19. Taxonomy according to Hao et al 2009. Hao et al. 2009, p223: “Revised diagnosis: Body length: 6-13 mm: wing length 8.2-15.6 mm Sc ending at wing margin approximately the same as R4+5 forking into R4 and R5; R1 long, r-r at one -third of its length before the end of R1; R2+3 shorter than R3; R4+5 short, R4+5 fork six times longer than dR4+5. M1 smoothly curved, m-m joining close to M1+2 bifurcations. M3+4 with a little bend at m-m. CuA slightly sigmoid beyond m-cu; A1 strongly curved to wing margin in two-thirds of its length.” Wing line drawing from Hao et al. 2009, p.225:
  20. From the album: Plants

    Pachyptes crassa and un-identified stem piece. Middle Jurassic, Injune Creek Beds.Oakey, Queensland Australie
  21. Welsh Wizard

    My Whitby Ammonite Collection

    Hi I decided to display a few of my Whitby ammonites. Most are self found, some bought. Some are prepped by me. Some prepped by other people. One of the ammonites on the top shelf isn’t from Whitby. Guess which. Where’s it from and what is it? I’ll post some close ups in due course. Thanks for looking.
  22. Last sunday October 24th I decided to visit the old Andil clay quarry at Liesberg in Switzerland, just over two hours driving from where I live, to see what fossils I might find there. Now a nature reserve where collecting is tolerated as long as the natural parts are not disturbed, the deposits at this quarry, mined for cement production between 1934 and 1980, date to the Upper Callovian and Lower to Middle Oxfordian (source). It is thus stratigraphically - though not petrologically - comparable to the geology of Vaches Noires in Normandy, with which I'm much more familiar, albeit with the in
  23. Hey all! Today I bring you some teeny tiny gastropods! All Inferior Oolite Group, Cotswolds UK. Every formation. There are a few different species that I have described here: Species A: "helter-skelter". A very very loose spiral, resembling a helter skelter... Species B: very neat loose spiraled. Species C: very tight spiral, very common Species D: fascinatingly bumpy textured spiral. Reminds me of a wallpaper! Measurements in cm. Isaac
  24. RomainH_Swiss

    Crab Claw Switzerland?

    Hello, Went fossil hunting in a famous Swiss Jurassic Location, the quarry of Liesberg. While cracking some rocks found what seems to be a crab claw. Can anyone help me identifying it? I was not aware such fossils could be found there, is it common or rather rare? Thank you! Cheers, Romain
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