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Found 9 results

  1. So I am driving on RT. 47 which leads to Vernonia and Mist, Oregon and a road cut that looks very similar to the Keasey locations I have been picking talus and for the first time it appears dry (seems to be a seep at the the top). In Oregon unless on private or in special circumstances BLM land you can not dig, you have to surface troll. I found a safe parking space and then crossed the road to enter the ditch. Once again close to traffic but people on this somewhat used road either slowed or pulled over, except for the truck who stopped and gave me directions to "a secret" place:), now that's
  2. OregonFossil

    Help with ID....

    My wife found this in some talus. It is 5mm long axis. Image was taken with a G9/Oly 60mm with extension tubes (2x). Is this a Crinoid? Looks like the feeding part. Any Ideas on what this fossils is? Keasey Formation, late Eocene. Mostly Mollusk and Gastropods however Crinoids are listed as being found in this location but rare.
  3. OregonFossil

    Panopea (?) micro fossil.

    This specimen from the Oligocene Keasey formation is 5mm long. This shale is extremely hard, I had to use the 3 pound hammer to break it. The rock it was encased in was 8 x 9" and this was the only fossil I could find after breaking all in 1-3" pieces. Image is a Olympus Macro 60mm image on a Panasonic G9 camera using flash. Do you consider a fossil of this size a Micro fossil? I am going to leave it in the matrix because I've tried dental tools on this particular shale and it is just too hard. Need to do some further work on the ID with external shell features/geometr
  4. OregonFossil

    What would you do?

    So I have found a significant "load" of mostly bivalves in a very deep water mudstone. This mudstone is very hard, when it fractures it is a lot like obsidian, extremely sharp and extremely hard. The specimen in this image is 3 x 5mm. The calcium shell has very little identifiable structures, yet the cast part seems "fair" crisp. If the shell was removed perhaps shell parts would be shown in the cast for ID. Would you remove the shell (if so how? acidic acid?). Any ideas on how to soften this mudstone, it is as hard but not as brittle as any shale I have seen. G picks don't see to do anything
  5. Need some ID help on this one. Eocene, Keasey Formation, and an inclusion or something inside a concretion. Size of the whole piece is 12 x 15 cm, weighs about 6 pounds. Image 1 - Mollusk on top of something that has included into the matrix #2 is a close up of the mollusk and surrounding area Closeup of the inclusion material More images to follow.
  6. I think I've found my "home" here. I have well over 50 pieces (a couple are large - 10-25 pounds) of formation that I've collected over the last three months to "investigate". Mostly sandstone and what I think is deep water mudstone (thought it was shale at first but no layering). Will try the Hydrogen Peroxide to dissolve the sandstones but am at a loss for the mudstones. the mudstones are extremely hard but contain lots of micro deep water (>200 meters) fossils. Any advice? I've included an image in the what I think is a softer mudstone higher up in the Keasy. This is juvenile
  7. No images (yet, they are coming), yesterday in celebration of my Stereo Microscope (3.5 to 90x with camera port) shipping I decided to go fossil hunting. @71 I have to be careful when I go hunting (my wife it turns out is a fair weather digger) by myself. I have spent the last months working on my collections from the summer in two Keasey Formation locations (deep and shallow marine) with good manual tools and a dremel, but with sup-optimal hand optics (one is actually a very nice 8x optic but just to hard to use). So my wife said why don't you get a reasonable scope (would be my first since h
  8. OregonFossil

    First Trip in 30 years:)

    So after a 30 year lull, my wife and I decided to do a fossil trip to "get out". She had never been. I had 12 hours of college geology and have done a lot of Devonian and Silurian digs (gave my collection to a friend who made a fireplace cover out of them in his home when I moved). I picked a location near the town of Timber, Oregon which has a nice Keasey Formation outcrop. But it is a dangerous climb so we settled for looking through the talus. My wife was very excited to find her first fossils:). Here are a couple of images. First is a cast and either a mold or the actual shell,
  9. tertiary crinoid. Articulated tertiary specimens, very rare Lit.: Moore, R. C. & Vokes, H. E. 1953. U.S.Geol.Survey Prof.Paper. 233-E: 124, Pl 23, fig 1, 3.
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