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  1. A new polycotylid plesiosaur has been recovered from the upper half of the upper member of the lower Maastrichtian (Late Cretaceous) Pierre Shale Formation of Wyoming: Serpentisuchops pfisterae, the snake-like crocodile face. The interesting aspect to this new discovery is that this polycotylid, contrary to most other known members of this clade (that is, all with the exception of the Turonian Thililua longicollis and Manemergus anguirostris from Morocco), has a elongated neck, convergent on those of elasmosauridae. The pertinent article can be found here: Scott Person
  2. Updated 1/17/20 I've taken a pretty firm position on the validity of Nanotyrannus ever since I spent some time looking at the Dueling Dinosaurs shortly after they were discovered. Subsequent to that, new information that I've become aware of just cemented my position. I'm interested in understanding the "truth" and have no problem looking at all available specimens that are in private hands or museums. The optics are very clear to me and I have difficulty understanding the debate. Collectors need to form their own opinion on this but I would like to share with you why I beli
  3. More and more dinosaur material is becoming available from the Two Medicine Formation. I see lots of misidentified material and some with questionable localities that might fit other deposits. I would like to summarize what I believe is currently known and published. If you see any omissions or errors, please let me know Not a lot of good maps out there to show the formation but here are two. The TMF is about 650 meters thick and is the western equivalent of the Judith River Formation. Most of the sediments were deposited in streams, rivers and lakes. It overlies the Virgel
  4. More and more dinosaur material is becoming available from the Judith River Formation. I see lots of misidentified material and some with questionable localities that might fit other deposits. I would like to summarize what I believe is currently known and published. If you see any omissions or errors, please let me know. Not a lot of good maps out there to show the formation but here are two. In general, the exposures are in North Central Montana. Horner describes the formation on the western end is near the east end of the Sweetgrass Hills (very thick about 152 meters) and
  5. My past two trips to Ramanessin Brook in Holmdel, NJ have been especially productive. Resulting in much larger teeth and much more diverse finds, Ramanessin has proven to be a much better spot than Big Brook for me. Here are the finds from the first trip: Many large anterior goblin shark teeth; a very large crow shark tooth; some very nice mackerel shark teeth; two pycnodont teeth; coral; a large ghost shrimp claw; a large ammonite fragment; a scallop with both shells intact; what I believe to be a fragment of a very large sawfish tooth (though it does seem especially stri
  6. I have been fossil hunting in the Monmouth County, NJ area for quite a few trips now, and I have accumulated a good amount of fossils I haven’t been able to ID. Here are some of them: Note: feel free to ask for more angles; I didn’t want to post too many images. 1 inch for scale Found in Ramanessin - no idea what it is Found in both brooks - 5 in middle look to be same species; I believe far-right is pycnodont or hadrodus Left - found in Ramanessin; think its coral Right - found in Big Brook; thought it was coral when I found it but I’m now leaning to
  7. A new ceratopsid-related paper is available online: Dalman, S.G., Jasinski, S.E., and Lucas, S.G., 2022. A new chasmosaurine ceratopsid from the Upper Cretaceous (Campanian) Farmington Member of the Kirtland Formation, New Mexico. New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin 90: 127–153. The name Bisticeratops froesorum originally appeared on the cladogram of the cladistic analysis of the paper describing Sierraceratops, but when the text of the published Sierraceratops paper was finalized, Bisticeratops froesorum was edited out from the cladogram and repla
  8. went hunting in the late cretaceous marine severn formation an found something weird. Its not ironstone, shell or bone and seems large for shrimp burrow. Could it be a coprolite?
  9. Anna Marie

    Another tooth ID

    Hoping this is something different as it's unlike any other tooth I've found there. More conical. A little worn. Any chance a plesiosaur!!! Thanks so much!!
  10. This one has me a bit stumped. It's pretty tiny. Sorry for forgetting the measuring device but its 3/8" or 9.53 mm. I've researched the heck out of it and have no hollow teeth from there let alone this small? Thanks so much!!
  11. The Two Medicine Formation is a late Cretaceous geological formation that was primarily deposited in North Central Montana 84 to 71 million years ago about the same time as the Judith River Formation, See Map - pink area. The Two Medicine is found along the east flank of the Rocky Mountains and represents the upland area of the Cretaceous Seaway while the Judith River Formation represents the lowland area. Although deposited in the roughly the same period the Two Medicine has yielded an amazing list of dinosaurs that are not found in the Judith River. These include Einiosaurus procurvicornis,
  12. I_gotta_rock

    What The Fossil?

    Found this in Big Brook, NJ (Late Cretaceous Navesink Fm.). It's about 2.5 cm wide. I don't even know what phylum to put it in. My first thought was bryozoan. There is one very thorough paper on Bryozoa of the Atlantic Coastal Plain, but it has nothing to fit the bill. Looks like sponge with those big holes. Found a picture of Discopora sp. that looks very close, but that genus is not listed in PBDB anywhere in North America. Gabb thought he had something similar from NJ, but it turned out to be a sand concretion. The last picture is the underside of the specimen, which may or may not be a thi
  13. I noticed this fossil in the limestone at the base of the great pyramid whilst on holiday. Reading online there are quite a few Nummulites in the rock of the pyramids themselves but not much information on larger finds and unlike the quarried and transported stone of the pyramids themselves this was seemingly part of the natural giza rock forming base around the structure. Im very much an amateur at this but out of pure interest I was wondering what you all may think of it?
  14. Brett Breakin' Rocks

    Baculite Mesa - WIPS Field Trip

    It has been some time since I posted anything of note. I'm still adjusting to my new surroundings here in Colorado but I did at least join a local Paleontological Society (WIPS) Western Interior Paleontological Society. My first field trip with the group was out to Baculite Mesa in Pueblo, CO. A location that is famous with a storied history, that is still giving up its ancient treasures. The weather here in Colorado can be touch and go at best, and our trip was almost delayed/cancelled by a late winter storm. This was our neighborhood in Denver the day before the trip. But temperatures
  15. Identification of theropod teeth from the Two Medicine formation is always a challenge even for the more experienced collector. Sellers whether its a dealer or auction site also struggle with identifications and sometimes just shotgun it. So I decided to put this together as an quick aide in providing you some information. Among the sources used is the reference book Dinosaur Systematics by Ken Carpenter and Phillip Currie... its an excellent reference source. This aide is for the more common teeth collected and sold, not for more obscure theropods. I'm sure mistakes/omissions have been made,
  16. val horn

    not horn coral but what is it?

    Found something new to me in a marine late cretaceous site in Maryland. I would have thought it horn coral but they were long extinct. A friend suggested rudist . All help will be appreciated
  17. For those interested in Dinosaurs from North America here is an excellent presentation on Oviraptorosaurs. Demonstrates how the lack of understanding of ontogeny may have impacted the number of described species. Study is ongoing but may point to multiple caenagnathids in the Hell Creek/Lance Formation. https://youtu.be/TpY9ygiG4ng
  18. Troodon

    Best Dinosaur Books

    My advice to any collector who is interested in dinosaurs is to become as much an expert as possible and do not rely solely on others for identification. One way to do so is to start a library of good reference books and pdf papers. This topic will focus on BOOKS There are a few must have books, if you're interested in TEETH and in my opinion this is the bible for North American ones. Dinosaur Systematics Approaches and Perspectives by Carpenter & Currie Addresses : 1)Chapter with detailed illustrations and ID guide of the teeth of Alberta's theropod's that are basical
  19. Seanrad09

    Another Lance Fossil

    Got another one than has me stumped from the Lance in Wyoming… any ideas guys? Thanks!
  20. The Judith River Formation is a late Cretaceous geological formation that was primarily deposited in North Central Montana 80 to 75 million years ago about the same time as the Two Medicine Formation, See Map - Large meandering rivers flowing into the Intercontinental Cretaceous Seaway deposited the Formation. Much of the area was very flat, with swamps and bogs, much like today's southern Louisiana. Dinosaurs included Tyrannosaurs, the duck-bills hadrosaur Brachylophosaurus was the most common found, Ceratopsian included Avaceratops and smaller theropods like Tr
  21. JoetheJerseyGuy

    Big Brook, NJ : Unknown Impression

    Big Brook, NJ. Not glass or metal. Shifted through a lot not sure of the id. If a fossil impression your specifics/details would be appreciated. Thank you.
  22. val horn

    late cretaceous unknown bone

    My first thought was that this was another piece of turtle which is common in the area, but when I looked at it again it is seems to be curved in to many ways. The "coral" growing on one edge is also unusual for the area-- i dont know what that reflects either. I will much appreciate help in understanding what I am looking at.
  23. JoetheJerseyGuy

    Big Brook : Root, Rock or Mosasaur?

    Big Brook - New Jersey: Marlboro. Is this a root, rock or mosasaur? Edges where you would expect it. Forgive the dirty nails came from the brook.
  24. val horn

    Rib?, late cretaceous marine

    Went hunting my local late cretaceous severn formation marine site. Found a 5 inch piece of bone (which is large for the site. I am guessing it is a rib piece because it is a long and flat oval bone. this is a site that has alot of turtle, enchodus and some croc and mossasaur. Is there anything to distinguish one rib chunk from another
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