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  1. The Jersey Devil

    Strange NJ Cretaceous Fish Bone

    Hi everyone, I have this partial fish bone from the Late Campanian of New Jersey, 72 Ma. I have never seen this type of bone structure before, but for some reason it reminds me of some type of rostrum (billfish?). It is a little over an inch at greatest dimension. Any ideas are appreciated!
  2. Just got back from a trip to the badlands of Montana and South Dakota in the Hell Creek Formation.. Here are some photos of some of the bones I picked up at an Edmontosaurus site. My hope was to collect specimens fitting in a shoebox and I was fairly successful at that which was quite surprise since you dont get to choose what you find. The site is faily large and the area I was collected had about 6 foot of overburden removed a couple of years ago so there was only 12 inches left before I hit the layer. The layer in this area is about 17 to 20 inches thick, white lines. Nothing is pr
  3. A new paper is available online: Christopher R. Noto; Stephanie K. Drumheller; Thomas L. Adams; Alan H. Turner (2019). "An enigmatic small neosuchian crocodyliform from the Woodbine Formation of Texas". The Anatomical Record. in press. doi:10.1002/ar.24174. Scolomastax constitutes the youngest record of Paralligatoridae from North America, indicating that paralligatorids spread to Appalachia prior to the Western Interior Seaway forming.
  4. David in Japan

    Late Cretaceous marine vertebrate's bone

    Hi TFF friends, how are you? I would like to have your opinion concerning the following fossil. It's a bone I found a while ago in the Himenoura formation, Santonian (Kumamoto Japan) and I forgot until I decided to clean my drawers. It has a quite distinctive shape and make me think to a sea turtle bone, a paddle or an ulna maybe. What kind of bone do you think it is? Any ID? I am not looking for the ID, I just would like to know what kind of bone it is.
  5. So I was rooting again around in the garage and found a couple plates I had bought a few years back and never tracked down an ID for. Tentative provenance was Paleocene from Montana. I found this article recently and was wondering if it could be one of the genera/sp described or one of the other genera mentioned in the discussion section. Trapa, Trapago, Fortuna, Quereuxia. STOCKEY, R. A., AND G. W. ROTHWELL. 1997. The aquatic angiosperm Trapago angulata from the Upper Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) St. Mary River Formation of southern Alberta. Int. J. Pl. Sci. 158: 83-94.
  6. MedicineHat

    2019 Alberta dinosaur fossils and more

    I have been out discovering some fossils and other cool stuff this spring. Lots of generally recognizable material but specifically I dont know what exactly I have here. Hopefully some of the enthusiasts and experts on the forum can help me out?
  7. The Jersey Devil

    Several NJ Cretaceous Non-Shark pathologies

    Hello TFF, I got a couple items from the Late Cretaceous of NJ that seem to be pathological. The first one, an Anomoeodus phaseolus tooth, seems to be very wrinkly and so I deemed it a patho. That is more of a verification as I haven’t seen a pathological one before. The second is an Ischyrhiza mira rostral blade that has a third carina on one of its faces and a slight flattening (flattening better seen in person). This is also a verification as I just didn’t expect to see a patho rostral. The third one is a bit strange. It is definitely a fish tooth. T
  8. The Jersey Devil

    NJ Well Preserved Turtle Peripheral

    Hi everyone, I got this interesting peripheral turtle shell from the Late Campanian Wenonah formation of NJ. It is not reworked and seems to be IDable. It also has some interesting shark predation marks on the top of the first pic. It is about 2.75” X 2.25” @non-remanié Thanks for any help!
  9. Troodon

    A New Hadrosauroid from Mongolia

    A new genus and species of hadrosauroid, Gobihadros mongoliensis, is described from a virtually complete and undeformed skull and skeleton from the Baynshire Formation (Cenomanian-Santonian) of the central and eastern Gobi Desert, Mongolia This paper is a GREAT reference for what the skull elements look like as well as most of the bones of the skeleton https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0208480 A new hadrosauroid (Dinosauria: Ornithopoda) from the Late Cretaceous Baynshire Formation of the Gobi Desert (Mongolia) Khishigjav
  10. Does anyone have a copy of the following paper: Ricardo C.Ely & Judd A.Case (2019) Phylogeny of a New Gigantic Paravian (Theropoda; Coelurosauria; Maniraptora) from the Upper Cretaceous of James Ross Island, Antarctica. Cretaceous Research (advance online publication)doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cretres.2019.04.003Â https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0195667118300120 Imperobator is quite notable as the first Gondwanan non-avialan paravian to be named from Antarctica.
  11. Does anyone have a copy of these papers??? : Javier Párraga; Albert Prieto-Márquez (2019). Pareisactus evrostos, a new basal iguanodontian (Dinosauria: Ornithopoda) from the Upper Cretaceous of southwestern Europe. Zootaxa 4555 (2): 247–258. doi:10.11646/zootaxa.4555.2.5. PMID 30790960. Julian C. G. Junior Silva; Thiago S. Marinho; Agustín G. Martinelli; Max C. Langer (2019). Osteology and systematics of Uberabatitan ribeiroi (Dinosauria; Sauropoda): a Late Cretaceous titanosaur from Minas Gerais, Brazil. Zootaxa. 4577 (3): 401–438. doi:10.11646/zootaxa.4577.3.1.
  12. Very cool article on a Hell Creek Fm bonebed in Bowman, North Dakota A meteor impact 66 million years ago generated a tsunami-like wave in an inland sea that killed and buried fish, mammals, insects and a dinosaur, the first victims of Earth’s last mass extinction event. The death scene from within an hour of the impact has been excavated at an unprecedented fossil site in North Dakota. (Graphics and photos courtesy of Robert DePalma) https://news.berkeley.edu/2019/03/29/66-million-year-old-deathbed-linked-to-dinosaur-killing-meteor/
  13. The First Definite Lambeosaurine Bone From the Liscomb Bonebed of Upper Cretaceous Prince Creek Formation, Alaska is presented in this paper. Nothing spectacular just from a cool place Article https://www.eurekalert.org/multimedia/pub/197034.php Paper https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-41325-8?fbclid=IwAR0RTstNFgb9CWp6GdNEmGxb52k-44JZ5WfQMds2KgmFjY_mQc8wLF0BoP8
  14. DD1991

    New titanosaur from Patagonia

    Hi, Is there a copy of the following paper: Leonardo S. Filippi, Leonardo Salgado & Alberto C. Garrido (2019) A new giant basal titanosaur sauropod in the Upper Cretaceous (Coniacian) of the Neuquen Basin, Argentina. Cretaceous Research (advance online publication)doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cretres.2019.03.008Â https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0195667118304816
  15. Step aside Sue, the T rex. The attached article finally describes the largest T rex discovered from the Frenchmans Formation of Saskatchewan, Canada after being discovered in 1991 Abstract Here we describe an extremely large and relatively complete (roughly 65%) skeleton of Tyrannosaurus rex (RSM P2523.8). Multiple measurements (including those of the skull, hip, and limbs) show that RSM P2523.8 was a robust individual with an estimated body mass exceeding all other known T. rex specimens and representatives of all other gigantic terrestrial theropods (Pay
  16. https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-03/ou-rrb031519.php https://www.app.pan.pl/archive/published/app64/app005682018.pdf
  17. Updated 1/17/20 I've taken a pretty firm position on the validity of Nanotyrannus ever since I spent some time looking at the Dueling Dinosaurs shortly after they were discovered. Subsequent to that, new information that I've become aware of just cemented my position. I'm interested in understanding the "truth" and have no problem looking at all available specimens that are in private hands or museums. The optics are very clear to me and I have difficulty understanding the debate. Collectors need to form their own opinion on this but I would like to share with you why I beli
  18. DD1991

    Trematochampsa

    Does anyone have a copy of the following paper that I could read: Louise M V Meunier, Hans C E Larsson; Trematochampsa taqueti as a nomen dubium and the crocodyliform diversity of the Upper Cretaceous In Beceten Formation of Niger, Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, Volume 182, Issue 3, 17 March 2018, Pages 659–680, https://doi.org/10.1093/zoolinnean/zlx061
  19. Modeling ecological niches and climate gives a different estimate of dinosaur diversity prior to the mass extinction. Implies that differential fossilization accounts for the apparent decline https://m.phys.org/news/2019-03-dinosaurs-asteroid.html
  20. Hey everyone, I am posting a pathological Prognathodon sp. tooth with 4 carinae and an odd slight indentation from the Late Cretaceous of New Jersey. I would like to hear any thoughts about this pathology type and if anyone has seen anything similar. Tooth is 17/16 inches. Thanks! Joseph
  21. https://phys.org/news/2018-12-horned-dinosaur-crittendenceratops-arizona.html
  22. Hi TFF friends, how are you? I am great, thank you for asking Yesterday I had I went to my favorite late cretaceous spot after an almost 3 month long forced break. So I decided to hunt all day long and went to few different spots with quite a good haul ( for me at least). First I went to an old Quarry in Kumamoto were the middle part of the Himenoura formation is visible. I hunted there few times in the past years and found a lot of ammonite's aptichii, Inoceramus and plants fossils. One year ago, the site was black and there
  23. Gokaden

    Need help with fossil ID

    Hello, I live in Austin, TX, and my house sits on top of the Glen Rose formation from the late Cretaceous. I usually find bi-valve oyster shells and the like in my yard, but came across something bigger today that seems like it's from a non-invertebrate. Can anyone provide information on what this fossil might be? Thanks. Joe
  24. The Amateur Paleontologist

    New bird from the Cretaceous of Utah

    hey everyone - hope you're all well Thought this was worth sharing - a description of a well-preserved enantiornithean bird specimen from the Late Cretaceous Kaiparowits Formation of Utah. It represents a new genus and species, Mirarce eatoni. The specimen was originally collected in 1992, but it was only recently described (and published yesterday!). Atterholt et al. (2018). The most complete enantiornithine from North America and a phylogenetic analysis of the Avisauridae. PeerJ, DOI 10.7717/peerj.5910 Abstract:
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