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  1. Dpaul7

    Inoceramus Bivalves 1 side a.JPG

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Inoceramus Bivalves SITE LOCATION: West Point, Nebraska, USA TIME PERIOD: Late Cretaceous (75-100 Million Years Ago) Data: Inoceramus (Greek: translation "strong pot") is an extinct genus of fossil marine pteriomorphian bivalves that superficially resembled the related winged pearly oysters of the extant genus Pteria. They lived from the Early Jurassic to latest Cretaceous. The taxonomy of the inoceramids is disputed, with genera such as Platyceramus sometimes classified as subgenus within Inoceramus. Also the number of valid species in
  2. Dpaul7

    Inoceramus Bivalves 1 side a.JPG

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Inoceramus Bivalves SITE LOCATION: West Point, Nebraska, USA TIME PERIOD: Late Cretaceous (75-100 Million Years Ago) Data: Inoceramus (Greek: translation "strong pot") is an extinct genus of fossil marine pteriomorphian bivalves that superficially resembled the related winged pearly oysters of the extant genus Pteria. They lived from the Early Jurassic to latest Cretaceous. The taxonomy of the inoceramids is disputed, with genera such as Platyceramus sometimes classified as subgenus within Inoceramus. Also the number of valid species in
  3. Dpaul7

    Inoceramus Bivalves 1 side a.JPG

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Inoceramus Bivalves SITE LOCATION: West Point, Nebraska, USA TIME PERIOD: Late Cretaceous (75-100 Million Years Ago) Data: Inoceramus (Greek: translation "strong pot") is an extinct genus of fossil marine pteriomorphian bivalves that superficially resembled the related winged pearly oysters of the extant genus Pteria. They lived from the Early Jurassic to latest Cretaceous. The taxonomy of the inoceramids is disputed, with genera such as Platyceramus sometimes classified as subgenus within Inoceramus. Also the number of valid species in
  4. Dpaul7

    Petrified Wood - Nebraska 1.JPG

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Petrified Wood SITE LOCATION: West Point, Cumings, Co., Nebraska, USA TIME PERIOD: Late Cretaceous (75-100 Million Years Ago) Data: Lake Superior Agate - Petrified wood (from the Greek root petro meaning "rock" or "stone"; literally "wood turned into stone") is the name given to a special type of fossilized remains of terrestrial vegetation. It is the result of a tree or tree-like plants having completely transitioned to stone by the process of permineralization. All the organic materials have been replaced with minerals (mostly a silic
  5. Dpaul7

    Petrified Wood - Nebraska 1.JPG

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Petrified Wood SITE LOCATION: West Point, Cumings, Co., Nebraska, USA TIME PERIOD: Late Cretaceous (75-100 Million Years Ago) Data: Lake Superior Agate - Petrified wood (from the Greek root petro meaning "rock" or "stone"; literally "wood turned into stone") is the name given to a special type of fossilized remains of terrestrial vegetation. It is the result of a tree or tree-like plants having completely transitioned to stone by the process of permineralization. All the organic materials have been replaced with minerals (mostly a silic
  6. Dpaul7

    Petrified Wood - Nebraska 1.JPG

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Petrified Wood SITE LOCATION: West Point, Cumings, Co., Nebraska, USA TIME PERIOD: Late Cretaceous (75-100 Million Years Ago) Data: Lake Superior Agate - Petrified wood (from the Greek root petro meaning "rock" or "stone"; literally "wood turned into stone") is the name given to a special type of fossilized remains of terrestrial vegetation. It is the result of a tree or tree-like plants having completely transitioned to stone by the process of permineralization. All the organic materials have been replaced with minerals (mostly a silic
  7. Dpaul7

    Petrified Wood - Nebraska 1.JPG

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Petrified Wood SITE LOCATION: West Point, Cumings, Co., Nebraska, USA TIME PERIOD: Late Cretaceous (75-100 Million Years Ago) Data: Lake Superior Agate - Petrified wood (from the Greek root petro meaning "rock" or "stone"; literally "wood turned into stone") is the name given to a special type of fossilized remains of terrestrial vegetation. It is the result of a tree or tree-like plants having completely transitioned to stone by the process of permineralization. All the organic materials have been replaced with minerals (mostly a silic
  8. Dpaul7

    Petrified Wood - Nebraska 1.JPG

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Petrified Wood SITE LOCATION: West Point, Cumings, Co., Nebraska, USA TIME PERIOD: Late Cretaceous (75-100 Million Years Ago) Data: Lake Superior Agate - Petrified wood (from the Greek root petro meaning "rock" or "stone"; literally "wood turned into stone") is the name given to a special type of fossilized remains of terrestrial vegetation. It is the result of a tree or tree-like plants having completely transitioned to stone by the process of permineralization. All the organic materials have been replaced with minerals (mostly a silic
  9. Paper just released that describes the dorsal vertebrae in detail of the titanosaur Dreadnoughtus schrani from Argentina that was described in 2014. If you ever wanted to know what the different areas of a dorsal vertebra were called this gives you more than you ever need. It also gives you relative position in the vertebral column. You will be tested on the pronunciation and spelling of these words Check the scale bar it's 50 cm (appox 20 inches) Complete dorsal vertebrae are very rare especially this well preserved. This discovery gives paleontologist an
  10. Tiny once thought to be a Triceratops its actually a Torosaurus Paper says Tiny is the most complete Cretaceous dinosaur found in Colorado http://www.denverpost.com/2017/12/05/thornton-triceratops-torosaurus/ Current bone map provide by Joe Sertich curator Denver Museum of Nature and Science Press Release from Museum
  11. Dpaul7

    MOSASAUR JAW.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Mosasaur Jaw Oued Zem, Morocco TIME PERIOD: Late Cretaceous (73-95 Million Years Ago) First and most importantly, mosasaurs are not dinosaurs. Mosasaurs (from Latin Mosa meaning the 'Meuse river', and Greek sauros meaning 'lizard') are an extinct group of large marine reptiles. Their first fossil remains were discovered in a limestone quarry at Maastricht on the Meuse in 1764. Mosasaurs probably evolved from an extinct group of aquatic lizards known as aigialosaurs in the Early Cretaceous. During the last 20 million years of the Cretace
  12. Dpaul7

    Fossil Mosasaur Teeth.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Fossil Mosasaur Teeth Khourigba, Morocco TIME PERIOD: Late Cretaceous (~70 Million Years ago) Data: First and most importantly, mosasaurs are not dinosaurs. Mosasaurs (from Latin Mosa meaning the 'Meuse river', and Greek sauros meaning 'lizard') are an extinct group of large marine reptiles. Their first fossil remains were discovered in a limestone quarry at Maastricht on the Meuse in 1764. Mosasaurs probably evolved from an extinct group of aquatic lizards known as aigialosaurs in the Early Cretaceous. During the last 20 million years of the Cretaceous period (Turonian-Maastri
  13. In March of this year I found a heteromorphic ammonite that has had me curious ever since. So yesterday I finally sent an email about it to a local ammonite expert, Ron Morin, who is associated with the Dallas Paleontological Society. I had a correspondence with him in May of this year as it related to him identifying my Phlycticrioceras trinodosum heteromorphic ammonite which I recently added to 'Collections'. That's when I first talked to him. Then at the Dallas Paleontological Society's Fossil Mania event in October, I was talking to Roger Farish about my unidentified ammonite. He recommend
  14. The Transylvanian area of Romania boasts a rich fossil record of dinosaurs, which lived on an island (Haţeg Island) during the very end of the Cretaceous. Many of these are dwarfed in body size or exhibit other unusual features thought to be linked to their insular habitat. One of the most common of these dinosaurs is the rhabdodontid ornithopod Zalmoxes. This paper takes a look at new specimens found at the Nălaț-Vad locality. A catalog of Zalmoxes (Dinosauria, Ornithopoda) specimens from the Upper Cretaceous Nălaț-Vad locality, Hațeg Basin, Romania. (American Museum novi
  15. 10313horn

    whose humerus

    went hunting in a small site that normally produces small crow shark teeth and enchodus teeth and pieces of turtle shell and found this bone. not sure what it belonged to.thanks
  16. D.N.FossilmanLithuania

    Possible dinosaur remains found in Lithuania

    Dear Guys, I recently found two remains (serrated tooth and scale) of possible small dinosaurs in the Late Cretaceous erratics of South Lithuania, Eastern Europe. The tooth is about 1,2 cm length, scale is 4 mm length. If the remains belong to dinosaurs, which dinosaur fossils it could be? Any opinions are very welcome Best Regards Domas
  17. Chiropractor discovers BC's first dino skull. Looks like a Tyrannosaurid. Pretty good find while on holiday http://www.cbc.ca/amp/1.4158748
  18. Nate c

    Bone Fragment

    I literally joined the forum 5 minutes ago, and I am still learning about the technicalities of paleontology. So if I use terms or vocabulary in the wrong context please excuse me. I have recently acquired a bone fragment that was found in the Hell Creek Formation near Jordan Montana,and it is from the Late cretaceous period. This is all I currently know about this fossil. I need help identifying the species that this bone fragment is from. Thanks for the help !
  19. DD1991

    Sauropod tooth from Hungary

    A new paper is available that will shed new light on Late Cretaceous titanosauriform evolution in Laurasia: http://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-03602-2#Sec4 The titanosaur fauna from Late Cretaceous Europe has been well documented in the literature over the generations, but the discovery of a basal titanosauriform tooth in Santonian-age sediments in Hungary is important because it fills a gap in the fossil record of post-Cenomanian, pre-late Campanian European titanosauriforms and suggests that Late Cretaceous non-titanosaur somphospondylians may have been more wi
  20. D.N.FossilmanLithuania

    Late Cretaceous small tetrapods found in Lithuania

    Dear Guys, I made the pictures of possible big discovery in Late Cretaceous erratics of Lithuania. There are some frog bones in flints (ilium, urostyle, tibiofibula, scapula), snake pieces (tibiofibula like of Tetrapodophis! and one thin scale), and toothed birs upper and lower jaw fossils. If you could confirm these finds, it will be the first further my article in scientific magazine and I wish it will be successful. There will be some posts, please review the pictures and tell what do you think. At first, I will show you frog remains. Best Rega
  21. Zuul crurivastator David Evans of the ROM contributed in describing a new ankylosaur from northern Montana's Judith River Fornatikn. One of the most complete Ankylosaurs ever found ROM's release http://www.rom.on.ca/en/collections-research/research-community-projects/zuul http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/deadthings/2017/05/09/meet-zuul-crurivastator-i-aint-fraid-of-no-ankylosaur/#.WRJrc5BlDxA http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2017/05/demon-faced-dinosaur-named-after-ghostbusters-baddie
  22. ptychodus

    Denticle

    Sorry, it's blurry. Hopefully identifiable. It is 3/4" x 1/2". From a late Cretaceous site. Shark or Ray?
  23. Placement of terrestrial formations in the late cretaceous of North America as been constantly evolving and in October 2016 Denver Fowler a Paleontologist at the Museum of the Rockies published a very extensive paper on the subject and updated most units. This is very important when it comes to understanding dinosaur evolution and aids in describing species. This paper is in the process of going through peer review so is subject to change. Fowler DW. (2016) A new correlation of the Cretaceous formations of the Western Interior of the United States, I: Santonian-Maastrichtian form
  24. JohnBrian

    Lance Formation Micro Tooth

    I have some Lance formation matrix I purchased on that auction site and I have been slowly breaking it down. This is one of my finds. I don't have a scale small enough to measure it against so . . . It is a little smaller than the head of a pin, flea speck. I did a Google image search on Lance Formation micro teeth but came up with nothing. The photos were taken with my Nikon point an shoot through the eyepiece of my microscope. These photos are the best I can do.
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