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  1. darrow

    Large Felid Radius?

    The long bone fragment is unlike any others I’ve collected but with both ends missing this is proving difficult for me to identify. I see some resemblance to the Smilodon radius on the University of Michigan Online Repository linked below, hoping someone can conform or steer me in the right direction. UMORF Viewer (umich.edu)
  2. Dereynes

    Late Pleistocene Iowa #4

    This was another find close to the others. I have seen similar bones like this one, that are listed as stag moose? I haven’t been doing this long enough to know which animal...
  3. geomorph

    Bones

    Hello, found on a glacial fluvial outwash plateau in eastern Washington state, probably around late Pleistocene/early Holocene. They were found next to each other and appear to fit together.
  4. Dereynes

    Late Pleistocene Mammals,Iowa

    My son and I went fossil hunting last weekend and here are our findings. The most recognizable is the mammoth tooth.
  5. I found this today. Same sand bar all the others were found. I’m really not sure what this is but think I should be excited?...
  6. Dereynes

    Late Pleistocene, Iowa tooth

    Found this guy today. A tooth but from what?my first guess is bison? Second, perhaps a stag moose or other large herbivore. I did find this near some of the bison finds.
  7. Not sure what this might be, but I thought is was the most intriguing find of the day. Beautiful patina, weighty for its size. Very old?
  8. Ramon

    Enamel piece?

    Hello, I recently found this object at the beach in Bolivar Peninsula, Tx. The fossils from the beach are washing out of an offshore late pleistocene deposit, probably from the Beaumont formation. I picked it up thinking it was some shell fragment, but it looks to me like it might be some enamel from a tooth. It has shades of colors bright orange, reds, and tints of blue and grey. Let me know what y’all think about it. Top side Top side revealing the texture patterns which look like they’ve been eroded. Bottom side (there se
  9. Yesterday I took a short trip to Crystal Beach, Bolivar Peninsula, TX. I found plenty of tumbled fossilized bone fragments, but this one caught my eye. I have no idea as to what it could be from, but if I had to guess it might be some bone from a fish. Maybe one of the many knowledgeable forum members can help me out. It is very thin, no more than 3 mm, and about 2 cm in length. It probably comes from an offshore deposits of the late Pleistocene, Beaumont Formation, which has been known to produce mammal remains and shark teeth.
  10. The Jersey Devil

    NJ Possible Mastodon Find

    Hey everyone, I have this possible Mastodon tooth “cone” from NJ. I know it is a fossil, meaning it’s got to be Cretaceous or Pleistocene because of the area it was found in, and it really doesn’t look like any Cretaceous bone I’ve seen from here. That shiny inner stuff on the inside (the concave side) of the item reminds me of enamel; it led me to conclude that this is a partial “cone” of a mastodon tooth. I don’t know much at all about mammals, but it appears that the shiny stuff is what’s left of the enamel/cementum/whatever it’s called that would have been on the inside of
  11. Dear Guys, Few months ago I found this partial tibia that is 20 cm length and has less protuberant central ridge than auroch or horse. The other interesting feature is oblong shallow pit in the side of central ridge and also smooth surface of plain bone part when horses have horizontal wrinkles of bone and bison or auroch has longitudinal waves in the same surface part. The frontal protuberant ridge, its low height and visible oblong pit in the side makes me think it should belong to camel but the only camel genus of European Pleistocene is Paracamelus that is fou
  12. Ramon

    What is this??

    Hi, I found this small fossilized bone, about 6 months ago in southern Galveston Island. I haven’t been able to ID what animal it came from. The geology of the area is from the Late Pleistocene (100,000-11000 years ago) Beaumont formation. I have found fossilized turtle shell fragments, and fossilized crab claws in the same location. It measures just about 1 cm in length and width. Any idea as to what is is? Front side Back side
  13. Hi all, So on Tuesday afternoon, I was lucky enough to only have a half day of school. Seeing that the weather was nice, and that I had nothing else to do except go home, I decided to take the bus in the other direction, so to Kijkduin, in order to do some fossil hunting! I bought a sandwich and a chocolate bar at the Shell gas station, and set out on the beach. From the beach of Kijkduin I walked south, so towards the Zandmotor, while of course looking for fossils. View of the beach (mind that the sea is on the right side, on the left side it's just a small lagoon), wi
  14. GeschWhat

    Merritt Island Matrix - Fused tail?

    I was digging around in Sacha's wonderful Merritt Island matrix the other day and found this. First let me apologize for the fuzziness of some of the images. My curiosity over-road my patience. Because of the ball and socket, I'm thinking this is a salamander caudal vertebra? If that is correct, would this be a vertebra that would break in an effort to avoid predators? Or could this be where the tail grew back? Mind you, these are just guesses. Perhaps it's not even from a salamander. I will try to get better photos, but this little bugger is so small, I'm having a hard time getting clear imag
  15. D.N.FossilmanLithuania

    Cave bear tibia?

    Dear Guys, I found this 17 cm length bone fragment in the sand dune layers of Varena town, there was the building site where the sand was deeply mixed up with younger layers. Judging by the shape, I think the most correct version should be bear (the tibial plateau is separated and not found). The last brown bear (Ursus arctos) in Lithuanian territory was hunted in 1885 but the tibia is quite big and maybe there are more features that could differ from present bear that is known is the European and Russian forests. Please help to confirm Ursidae family by this bone an
  16. D.N.FossilmanLithuania

    Carnivore or ungulate radius?

    Dear Guys, I have found this bone fragment about 6 months ago and I am not sure which family of mammal it belongs to. It is the lower end of radius, to me looks like similar to carnivorous cat but I am not sure if it cannot be an ungulate. The length of piece is 9 cm. Please help to identify this bone. Any help will be appreciated! Best Regards Domas
  17. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Mammoth Tooth - Mammuthus columbi SITE LOCATION: West Point, Cumings County, Nebraska TIME PERIOD: Late Pleistocene - (About 25 thousand years old) Data: The Columbian mammoth (Mammuthus columbi) is an extinct species of mammoth that inhabited North America as far north as the northern United States and as far south as Costa Rica during the Pleistocene epoch. It was one of the last in a line of mammoth species, beginning with M. subplanifrons in the early Pliocene. The Columbian mammoth evolved from the steppe mammoth, which entered Nor
  18. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Mammoth Tooth - Mammuthus columbi SITE LOCATION: West Point, Cumings County, Nebraska TIME PERIOD: Late Pleistocene - (About 25 thousand years old) Data: The Columbian mammoth (Mammuthus columbi) is an extinct species of mammoth that inhabited North America as far north as the northern United States and as far south as Costa Rica during the Pleistocene epoch. It was one of the last in a line of mammoth species, beginning with M. subplanifrons in the early Pliocene. The Columbian mammoth evolved from the steppe mammoth, which entered Nor
  19. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Mammoth Tooth - Mammuthus columbi SITE LOCATION: West Point, Cumings County, Nebraska TIME PERIOD: Late Pleistocene - (About 25 thousand years old) Data: The Columbian mammoth (Mammuthus columbi) is an extinct species of mammoth that inhabited North America as far north as the northern United States and as far south as Costa Rica during the Pleistocene epoch. It was one of the last in a line of mammoth species, beginning with M. subplanifrons in the early Pliocene. The Columbian mammoth evolved from the steppe mammoth, which entered Nor
  20. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Mammoth Tooth - Mammuthus columbi SITE LOCATION: West Point, Cumings County, Nebraska TIME PERIOD: Late Pleistocene - (About 25 thousand years old) Data: The Columbian mammoth (Mammuthus columbi) is an extinct species of mammoth that inhabited North America as far north as the northern United States and as far south as Costa Rica during the Pleistocene epoch. It was one of the last in a line of mammoth species, beginning with M. subplanifrons in the early Pliocene. The Columbian mammoth evolved from the steppe mammoth, which entered Nor
  21. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Mammoth Tooth - Mammuthus columbi SITE LOCATION: West Point, Cumings County, Nebraska TIME PERIOD: Late Pleistocene - (About 25 thousand years old) Data: The Columbian mammoth (Mammuthus columbi) is an extinct species of mammoth that inhabited North America as far north as the northern United States and as far south as Costa Rica during the Pleistocene epoch. It was one of the last in a line of mammoth species, beginning with M. subplanifrons in the early Pliocene. The Columbian mammoth evolved from the steppe mammoth, which entered Nor
  22. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Mammoth Tooth - Mammuthus columbi SITE LOCATION: West Point, Cumings County, Nebraska TIME PERIOD: Late Pleistocene - (About 25 thousand years old) Data: The Columbian mammoth (Mammuthus columbi) is an extinct species of mammoth that inhabited North America as far north as the northern United States and as far south as Costa Rica during the Pleistocene epoch. It was one of the last in a line of mammoth species, beginning with M. subplanifrons in the early Pliocene. The Columbian mammoth evolved from the steppe mammoth, which entered Nor
  23. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Mammoth Tooth - Mammuthus columbi SITE LOCATION: West Point, Cumings County, Nebraska TIME PERIOD: Late Pleistocene - (About 25 thousand years old) Data: The Columbian mammoth (Mammuthus columbi) is an extinct species of mammoth that inhabited North America as far north as the northern United States and as far south as Costa Rica during the Pleistocene epoch. It was one of the last in a line of mammoth species, beginning with M. subplanifrons in the early Pliocene. The Columbian mammoth evolved from the steppe mammoth, which entered Nor
  24. darrow

    Sloth Claw

    Collected this just now...
  25. Fossil coral reefs show sea level rose in bursts during last warming Reefs near Texas endured punctuated bursts of sea-level rise before drowning, Jade Boyd, Rice university, October 19, 2017 http://news.rice.edu/2017/10/19/fossil-coral-reefs-show-sea-level-rose-in-bursts-during-last-warming-2/ https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171019100954.htm Pankaj Khanna, André W. Droxler, Jeffrey A. Nittrouer, John W. Tunnell Jr, Thomas C. Shirley. Coralgal reef morphology records punctuated sea-level rise during the last deglaciation. Nature Communica
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