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  1. Fossildude19

    Diplurus partial

    From the album: Fossildude's Late Triassic Lockatong Formation Fossils

    Diplurus newarki - partial coelacanth Late Triassic, Newark Supergroup, Newark Basin, Lockatong Formation, North Bergen, NJ, old Granton Quarry G-3 layer.
  2. GuineaPoliceman

    Strange leaf looks like insect wing

    Hi everyone. I found strange leaf. Leaf venation is unusial. Can it be somebody's wing? Length 53 mm. Russia, Chelyabinsk region. Late triassic or early jurassic.
  3. A new paper is out online: Nesbitt, S. J.; Stocker, M. R.; Chatterjee, S.; Horner, J. R., & Goodwin, M. B., 2021. A remarkable group of thick‐headed Triassic Period archosauromorphs with a wide, possibly Pangean distribution. Journal of Anatomy In press. doi:10.1111/joa.13414. I remember the "Triassic pachycephalosaur" from India that was discussed at a number of vertebrate paleontology symposia by Sankar Chatterjee, but the description of this form as Kranosaura reinforces my opinion about the "Triassic pachycephalosaur" being a Triopticus relative. The paper also
  4. Osteology of the late triassic archosaur Heptasuchus is presented in this paper https://peerj.com/articles/10101/
  5. DD1991

    New material of Acaenasuchus

    A new Triassic archosaur paper is available online: Adam D. Marsh, Matthew E. Smith, William G. Parker, Randall B. Irmis & Ben T. Kligman (2020) Skeletal anatomy of Acaenasuchus geoffreyi Long and Murry, 1995 (Archosauria: Pseudosuchia) and its Implications for the Origin of the Aetosaurian Carapace. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology DOI: 10.1080/02724634.2020.1794885 If anyone is new to Triassic paleontology or early archosaurs, Acaenasuchus was named by Long & Murry (1995) on the basis of material collected from the Blue Mesa Member of the Chinle Formation of
  6. A new paper is available online: Oliver W. M. Rauhut; Femke M. Holwerda; Heinz Furrer (2020). A derived sauropodiform dinosaur and other sauropodomorph material from the Late Triassic of Canton Schaffhausen, Switzerland. Swiss Journal of Geosciences 113 (1): Article number 8. doi:10.1186/s00015-020-00360-8. Schleitheimia is the first latest Norian-Rhaetian sauropodiform to be described from mainland Europe (Camelotia is a sauropodiform, but comes from the British Isles), considering that Triassic sauropodomorph cladistic diversity from Central Europe was thought to be d
  7. Hi, If anyone is familiar with dinosaur names, the sauropodomorph informally known for a long time as "Thotobolosaurus" has been finally described and named in this paper: Claire Peyre de Fabrègues; Ronan Allain (2020). Kholumolumo ellenbergerorum, gen. et sp. nov., a new early sauropodomorph from the lower Elliot Formation (Upper Triassic) of Maphutseng, Lesotho. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology in press: e1732996. doi:10.1080/02724634.2019.1732996. Kholumolumo is the latest addition to an increasing number of sauropodomorph taxa from the lower Elliot For
  8. A new Triassic theropod-related paper is available online: Marion Zahner; Winand Brinkmann (2019). A Triassic averostran-line theropod from Switzerland and the early evolution of dinosaurs. Nature Ecology & Evolution. 3. doi:10.1038/s41559-019-0941-z. Notatesseraeraptor is the third European Triassic theropod for which cranial remains are known (the still-to-be-renamed form Zanclodon cambrensis [aka "Newtonsaurus"]), and given the lack of crests as in Dilophosaurus and its placement next to Averostra and Dilophosauridae, it indicates a higher cladistic diversity of
  9. Does anyone have a copy of the following paper I could read: Valentin Buffa; Nour‐Eddine Jalil; J.‐Sebastien Steyer (2019). Redescription of Arganasaurus (Metoposaurus) azerouali (Dutuit) comb. nov. from the Upper Triassic of the Argana Basin (Morocco), and the first phylogenetic analysis of the Metoposauridae (Amphibia, Temnospondyli). Papers in Palaeontology in press. doi:10.1002/spp2.1259. Although Hunt (1993) designated Metoposaurus azerouali a nomen dubium, the paper by Buffa et al. overturns that taxonomic opinion by shedding new info on the anatomy of this little
  10. DD1991

    Anaschisma redescribed

    A new metoposaurid paper is available online: Bryan M. Gee; William G. Parker; Adam D. Marsh (2019). Redescription of Anaschisma (Temnospondyli: Metoposauridae) from the Late Triassic of Wyoming and the phylogeny of the Metoposauridae. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology in press. doi:10.1080/14772019.2019.1602855. After being declared a nomen dubium by Hunt (1993), Anaschisma is now considered a senior synonym of Buettneria and Koskinonodon. By the way, does anyone have a copy of this paper? The question is whether "Buettneria" bakeri is considered generica
  11. A new paper on early lissamphibians is available online: Michelle R. Stocker; Sterling J. Nesbitt; Ben T. Kligman ; Daniel J. Paluh; Adam D. Marsh; David C. Blackburn ; William G. Parker (2019). The earliest equatorial record of frogs from the Late Triassic of Arizona. Biology Letters. 15 (2): Article ID 20180922. doi:10.1098/rsbl.2018.0922. The frog material described by Stocker et al. is significant because it is the first record of Salientia from the Late Triassic, constituting the second described record of Late Triassic Lissamphibia after the primitive caecilian Ch
  12. Date of Trip: June 2018 Location: Quay Co., NM, USA Age: Late Triassic Formation: Redonda This was the second of a number of hunting trips across the country this summer (the first was Silex, MO, reported earlier). This will be the Triassic Vertebrate report from this trip. Triassic invertebrate report will have to wait (perhaps exciting news ). Triassic plants and Cretaceous inverts from the same general locality will also be reported later. These are finds from a coarse-grained fluvial deposit rich in fish remains. In one layer, ganoid fish scales w
  13. Fossildude19

    Coelacanth ribs and pelvic fin

    From the album: Fossildude's Late Triassic Lockatong Formation Fossils

    Tail and body imprints, plus a partial skull, of 3 to 4 different Diplurus newarki. Newark Supergroup, Newark Basin, Late Triassic, Lockatong Formation. Granton Quarry, North Bergen, New Jersey.

    © © 2016 Tim Jones

  14. Fossildude19

    Unidentified fish Skull

    From the album: Fossildude's Late Triassic Lockatong Formation Fossils

    This skull will need to be prepared to find out what it is. It looks a bit too narrow to be from Diplurus newarki, (although, it could be) . It could also possibly be from the early ray finned fish, Turseodus sp. or Synorichthys sp., which are known from the same strata. Newark Supergroup, Newark Basin, Late Triassic, Lockatong Formation. North Bergen New Jersey. Granton Quarry.

    © © 2016 Tim Jones

  15. Fossildude19

    1/2 coelacanth

    From the album: Fossildude's Late Triassic Lockatong Formation Fossils

    Diplurus newarki. front and lower half of fish. Late Triassic, Newark Supergroup, Newark Basin, Lockatong Formation, North Bergen, New Jersey. Old Granton Quarry. Scale is in CM.

    © 2019 T. Jones

  16. CharlesNM

    Tooth and Mandible Identification

    Hi, I found this tooth and possibly the upper mandible in an arroyo in New Mexico in a place called Copper Canyon. It is about 5.5 miles from Ghost Ranch. The layer is most likely late triassic chinle formation but it's on a major fault. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
  17. Congratulations to @paulgdls on such a significant discovery. http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0194742 https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2018/04/prehistoric-sea-monster-largest-size-blue-whale-fossils-science/
  18. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Apachesaurus amphibian vertebra Bull Canyon Formation, San Miguel County, New Mexico Late Triassic (~237 - 201.3 million years ago) Apachesaurus was a member of the Metoposauridae group of temnospondyl amphibians,‭ ‬though one that was particularly small.‭ ‬The larger close relatives of Apachesaurus include Metoposaurus and Koskinonodon which could grow up to two and a half to three meters long.‭ ‬Apachesaurus however grew only to around just over forty centimetres long. Due to the smaller size,‭ ‬Apachesaurus were probably predators of smaller aquatic organisms.‭ ‬Like other related
  19. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Apachesaurus amphibian vertebra Bull Canyon Formation, San Miguel County, New Mexico Late Triassic (~237 - 201.3 million years ago) Apachesaurus was a member of the Metoposauridae group of temnospondyl amphibians,‭ ‬though one that was particularly small.‭ ‬The larger close relatives of Apachesaurus include Metoposaurus and Koskinonodon which could grow up to two and a half to three meters long.‭ ‬Apachesaurus however grew only to around just over forty centimetres long. Due to the smaller size,‭ ‬Apachesaurus were probably predators of smaller aquatic organisms.‭ ‬Like other related
  20. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Apachesaurus amphibian vertebra Bull Canyon Formation, San Miguel County, New Mexico Late Triassic (~237 - 201.3 million years ago) Apachesaurus was a member of the Metoposauridae group of temnospondyl amphibians,‭ ‬though one that was particularly small.‭ ‬The larger close relatives of Apachesaurus include Metoposaurus and Koskinonodon which could grow up to two and a half to three meters long.‭ ‬Apachesaurus however grew only to around just over forty centimetres long. Due to the smaller size,‭ ‬Apachesaurus were probably predators of smaller aquatic organisms.‭ ‬Like other related
  21. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Apachesaurus amphibian vertebra Bull Canyon Formation, San Miguel County, New Mexico Late Triassic (~237 - 201.3 million years ago) Apachesaurus was a member of the Metoposauridae group of temnospondyl amphibians,‭ ‬though one that was particularly small.‭ ‬The larger close relatives of Apachesaurus include Metoposaurus and Koskinonodon which could grow up to two and a half to three meters long.‭ ‬Apachesaurus however grew only to around just over forty centimetres long. Due to the smaller size,‭ ‬Apachesaurus were probably predators of smaller aquatic organisms.‭ ‬Like other related
  22. D.N.FossilmanLithuania

    Unidentified bony fish tooth

    Dear Guys, I recently found one plate like tooth in dolomite erratic, probably Late Triassic age. It is 6 mm length and has rough texture that is not typical to chimaeroids. I guess it could be mouth plate of sturgeon (its mouth opens when four plates spread in the sides) but I did not find information about isolated these elements. Some very similar teeth are shown in interent pictures and are dating by Early Jurassic: http://www.darwincountry.org/explore/005818.html?CatAdd=5818&sid= Please help to identify this specific taxon of fishes with the same app
  23. D.N.FossilmanLithuania

    Please confirm frog omosternum fossil in matrix

    Dear Guys, I recently found the triangle bone in dolomite erratic of Varena town, South Lithuania, it is 4 mm length. It has the wider growths in the lower sides and straight blunt bony growth in the top. The dolomite also has poorly visible calcified lenses (maybe oncolites?). The erratic is typical to Triassic arid conditions and should belong to Late Triassic epoch because frogs from Early Triassic are found only in Madagascar island. Here is the link in frog omosternum: http://scienceblogs.com/tetrapodzoology/2010/08/27/blombergs-toad-and-buddies/
  24. Dpaul7

    IMG_7794.JPG

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Coelophysis Dinosaur tooth fossils SITE LOCATION: Bull Canyon Formation, Dockum Group, San Miguel Co., New Mexico TIME PERIOD: Late Triassic (203-196 Million Years Ago) Data: Coelophysis is an extinct genus of coelophysid theropod dinosaur that lived approximately 203 to 196 million years ago during the latter part of the Triassic Period in what is now the southwestern United States and also in South Africa and Zimbabwe. Coelophysis was a small, slenderly-built, ground-dwelling, bipedal carnivore, that could grow up to 3 m (9.8 ft) long
  25. Dpaul7

    IMG_7794.JPG

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Coelophysis Dinosaur tooth fossils SITE LOCATION: Bull Canyon Formation, Dockum Group, San Miguel Co., New Mexico TIME PERIOD: Late Triassic (203-196 Million Years Ago) Data: Coelophysis is an extinct genus of coelophysid theropod dinosaur that lived approximately 203 to 196 million years ago during the latter part of the Triassic Period in what is now the southwestern United States and also in South Africa and Zimbabwe. Coelophysis was a small, slenderly-built, ground-dwelling, bipedal carnivore, that could grow up to 3 m (9.8 ft) long
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