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  1. ThePhysicist

    Tiger shark tooth

    From the album: Sharks

    The tiger shark is still around today. Their unique teeth are very good at cutting through tough turtle shell - their favorite prey. Their teeth also happen to work on about anything else that can fit in their mouths.
  2. I could not find the date I found the attached amber from Lee Creek (about 26 trips). Had misplaced it (in one of my Miscellaneous bins, instead of one of my Lee Creek bins), but finally located it and is 4 inches long and 3 inches wide and a little over an inch high. I wonder how many, if any, inclusions could be inside?
  3. ThePhysicist

    Whale shark tooth (2)

    From the album: Lee Creek

    Rhincodon cf. typus Pungo River Fm., Aurora, NC, USA a minute tooth from the biggest fish in the sea - the whale shark. Being filter-feeders, their teeth serve no known function and are considered vestigial.
  4. fossilhunter21

    Physogaleus contortus

    This specimen was found in micro matrix purchased from the Aurora, North Carolina Fossil Museum. Description: Teeth are very similar to the genus Galeocerdo with finely serrated, long, thick and warped crowns; pronounced notch, small serrations on heel of distal side. Undulating margin and fine serrations on mesial edge. U-shaped root with a prominent protuberance on lingual face and transverse groove (Fig. 5.10). Physogaleus contortus differs from the genus Galeocerdo in having very prominent and bulging root with the deep notch, and a much more erect cro
  5. Greetings again Thisis a second vertebra also found at the Lee Creek Mine (aka Aurora) in Yorktown spoils. It is 50mm in length, rather porous and very light. I was thinking bird, but thought I'd get some other opinions. Any ID suggestions? The photos in order are: "bottom", "top", "side", end 1 and end 2
  6. hemipristis

    Pliocene vertebra Yorktown Fm. Bird?

    Greetings, Since There's not much collecting to be done here, I've started diving into the collection and trying to ID and label. I found this vertebra at the Lee Creek Mine (aka Aurora) in Yorktown spoils. It is 33mm in length, rather porous and very light. I was thinking bird, but thought I'd get some other opinions. Any ID suggestions? The photos in order are: "bottom", "top", "side", end 1 and end 2
  7. ThePhysicist

    Whale shark tooth

    Identification: Ray, Clayton E. and Bohaska, David J. 2001. Geology and Paleontology of the Lee Creek Mine, North Carolina, III. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution. https://doi.org/10.5479/si.00810266.90.1 From Page 99 & 100: "The crown of the Lee Creek Mine tooth (Figure 15o) is sharp, slightly curved lingually, and has a perfectly smooth surface. It is compressed laterally, and the cutting edges are distinct but dull. A narrow and relatively long apron descends onto the lingual face of the root. The roots of these teeth are bulbous and are wider at
  8. ThePhysicist

    Whale shark tooth

    From the album: Lee Creek

    Rhincodon cf. typus Pungo River Fm., Aurora, NC, USA A minute tooth from the biggest fish in the sea, the whale shark. Being filter-feeders, their teeth serve no known function and are considered vestigial.
  9. hokietech96

    Tooth ID Help

    Just in case you did not read my recent post... Hope everyone is doing well. I miss being in a creek or on the beach, but all in due time. Every night I have been relaxing going through different types of matrix. Last week, in addition to looking through Bakerfield matrix, I also looked through Pungo Formation matrix from Lee Creek. I believe the these are three shark teeth are whale or basking shark teeth. All measurements are in MM. Any feedback (as always) is much appreciated!! 1. Basking shark tooth with the root!! If I am right... wow! If I am wrong.. nothing new and
  10. ClearLake

    Small Lee Creek Shark Tooth

    I received some matrix from @sixgill pete a while back in a TFF auction and picked most of it a while back and ID'd the bulk of the teeth and other material. Lately I have been going back through some of my sharks teeth and looking more closely at items I was unsure of These three teeth are one such group out of this matrix. I have read Purdy et, al (2001) a bunch of times, looked at elasmo.com for hours on end, read dozens of threads on here and am still a bit confused/uncertain. So, I figured why no just ask and get several more opinions, I always appreciate what folks here have to offer
  11. hokietech96

    Lee Creek ID Help

    Hi. Happy New Year everyone! I was looking through some more matrix and I came accross this 2mm ammonite or cinnimon roll look alike Any idea what this could be? Thanks so much for any feedback.
  12. fossilhunter21

    Tooth?

    Hi everyone! Recently I purchased some Lee Creek micro matrix and found what I think might be a tooth. -@fossilhunter21
  13. Scale is in mm. Found in Lee Creek material.
  14. Is this a diatom found in Lee Creek material? Scale is mm.
  15. Found in the Lee Creek spoils pile. Is this a whale vertebra or possibly a digit bone? The somewhat flattened and oval cross section kind of looks like images of whale digit bones to me, but I am far from knowledgeable about this. Bonus with this find is the shark tooth embedded in the concretion on the top of the fossil. Any guesses as to what it is?
  16. DevilDog

    Small Lee Creek shark teeth ID

    Please help with an ID for these small teeth found in the Lee Creek spoils pile. Sorry for the poor image quality, but my cell phone does not take good pictures of tiny objects. Both teeth are approx. 5mm wide and 7mm tall
  17. Found in the Lee Creek spoils pile. Is this some sort of coral or a cast of a burrow? The item is tubular and was hollow at one point and filled with something that looks like obsidian or flint. Or maybe it was the other way around and the "filling" was covered by the material surrounding it? Maybe something geologic and not even a fossil?
  18. hemipristis

    One more Odontocete? tooth, Pliocene

    One more. What throws me off about this one is the oval root base, when all several dozen other Odontocete teeth have a circular root base, and the wear pattern on the tip. Thoughts?
  19. hemipristis

    odontocete teeth ID, Pliocene

    hello everyone, I am looking for some assistance in identifying two odontocete teeth from the Pliocene Yorktown Fm, Lee Creek Mine. The first photo shows the two teeth in question on the left vs a Kogiopsis sp. tooth on the right Are the teeth in question just Kogiopsis with the crunchy outer coating intact? Marine mammal ID isn't my forte. There are 3 photos each. Interesting that the second of these teeth almost has an opaline filling of the basal cavity. Any help is greatly appreciated! TOOTH #1 TO
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