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Found 25 results

  1. From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    “Oise Amber” Creil, Oise Department, France Argiles à lignites du Soissonnais Lowermost Eocene (~56-53 Ma) Specimen C (Left): 0.4g / 15x12x5mm Specimen D (Right): 0.3g / 10x10x8mm Lighting: Longwave UV (365nm) Entry nine of ten, detailing various rare ambers from European, Asian, and North American localities. French amber localities are extremely numerous and are found in 35 departments. There are at least 55 Cretaceous amber localities, contained mainly within the southern half of Franc

    © Kaegen Lau

  2. From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    “Oise Amber” Creil, Oise Department, France Argiles à lignites du Soissonnais Lowermost Eocene (~56-53 Ma) Specimen C (Left): 0.4g / 15x12x5mm Specimen D (Right): 0.3g / 10x10x8mm Lighting: 140lm LED Entry nine of ten, detailing various rare ambers from European, Asian, and North American localities. French amber localities are extremely numerous and are found in 35 departments. There are at least 55 Cretaceous amber localities, contained mainly within the southern half of France; three F

    © Kaegen Lau

  3. From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    “Oise Amber” Creil, Oise Department, France Argiles à lignites du Soissonnais Lowermost Eocene (~56-53 Ma) Specimen A (Upper Left): 0.5g / 14x13x12mm Specimen B (Upper Right): 0.35g / 13x9x7mm Specimen C (Lower Left): 0.4g / 15x12x5mm Specimen D (Lower Right): 0.3g / 10x10x8mm Lighting: 140lm LED Entry nine of ten,

    © Kaegen Lau

  4. From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    “Sakhalin Amber” Sakhalin Island, Russia Starodubskoye, Nayba River Estuary Naibuchi Fm. (Autochthonous) Middle Eocene (~47.8-38 Ma) Specimen D: 0.3g / 14x8x5mm Lighting: 140lm LED Entry eight of ten, detailing various rare ambers from European, Asian, and North American localities. The island Sakhalin is located in the Far East region of Russia, just north of the island of Hokkaido, Japan. Amber is usually found washed onto the shoreline, near the village of Starodubskoye; it is eroded f

    © Kaegen Lau

  5. From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    “Sakhalin Amber” Sakhalin Island, Russia Starodubskoye, Nayba River Estuary Naibuchi Fm. (Autochthonous) Middle Eocene (~47.8-38 Ma) Specimen B: 0.4g / 17x7x7mm Lighting: 140lm LED Entry eight of ten, detailing various rare ambers from European, Asian, and North American localities. The island Sakhalin is located in the Far East region of Russia, just north of the island of Hokkaido, Japan. Amber is usually found washed onto the shoreline, near the village of Starodubskoye; it is eroded f

    © Kaegen Lau

  6. From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    “Sakhalin Amber” Sakhalin Island, Russia Starodubskoye, Nayba River Estuary Naibuchi Fm. (Autochthonous) Middle Eocene (~47.8-38 Ma) Specimen C: 0.35g / 14x8x6mm Lighting: 140lm LED Entry eight of ten, detailing various rare ambers from European, Asian, and North American localities. The island Sakhalin is located in the Far East region of Russia, just north of the island of Hokkaido, Japan. Amber is usually found washed onto the shoreline, near the village of Starodubskoye; it is eroded

    © Kaegen Lau

  7. From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    “Sakhalin Amber” Sakhalin Island, Russia Starodubskoye, Nayba River Estuary Naibuchi Fm. (Autochthonous) Middle Eocene (~47.8-38 Ma) Specimen A: 0.5g / 15x9x8mm Lighting: 140lm LED Entry eight of ten, detailing various rare ambers from European, Asian, and North American localities. The island Sakhalin is located in the Far East region of Russia, just north of the island of Hokkaido, Japan. Amber is usually found washed onto the shoreline, near the village of Starodubskoye; it is eroded f

    © Kaegen Lau

  8. From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    “Sakhalin Amber” Sakhalin Island, Russia Starodubskoye, Nayba River Estuary Naibuchi Fm. (Autochthonous) Middle Eocene (~47.8-38 Ma) Specimen A (Top Left): 0.5g / 15x9x8mm Specimen B (Top Right): 0.4g / 17x7x7mm Specimen C (Bottom Right): 0.35g / 14x8x6mm Specimen D (Bottom Left): 0.3g / 14x8x5mm Lighting: Longwave UV Entry eight of ten, detailing various rare ambers from European, Asian, and North American localities. The island Sakhalin is located in the Far East re

    © Kaegen Lau

  9. From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    “Sakhalin Amber” Sakhalin Island, Russia Starodubskoye, Nayba River Estuary Naibuchi Fm. (Autochthonous) Middle Eocene (~47.8-38 Ma) Specimen A (Top Left): 0.5g / 15x9x8mm Specimen B (Top Right): 0.4g / 17x7x7mm Specimen C (Bottom Right): 0.35g / 14x8x6mm Specimen D (Bottom Left): 0.3g / 14x8x5mm Lighting: 140lm LED

    © Kaegen Lau

  10. Barrelcactusaddict

    Siegburgite (Cottbus Fm., 25.5-23.5 Ma [min.])

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    "Siegburgite" Goitzsche Opencast Mine Bitterfeld-Wolfen, Saxony-Anhalt State, Germany Bernsteinschluff Horizon Cottbus Fm. (25.5-23.5 Ma [min.]) Chemical Composition: C: 81.37%, H: 5.26%, O: 13.37%, Cinnamic Acid: 0.0073% Specimen A (Top Left): 0.4g / 14x12x6mm Specimen B (Top Right): 0.5g / 14x14x8mm Specimen C (Bottom Left): 0.3g / 14x12x4mm Specimen D (Bottom Right): 0.2g / 13x10x4mm *I did not take a photograph of these specimens under longwave UV, due to the fluorescent response of Siegburgite being so weak; they

    © Kaegen Lau

  11. From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    - Subjects: Three exceptional specimens of amber, recovered from exposures on Tiger Mountain, Washington State; this is the second of two videos detailing the specimens' natural fluorescent and phosphorescent responses: longwave UV light (Convoy S2 flashlight) was used in this entry. All were prepared by hand using a diamond needle file, 240 to 3,000 grit SiC sandpaper, and chromium oxide (ZAM compound) on a Selvyt microfiber cloth. - Amber's Source Formations and Age: The amber-bearing coal contained within the the Tiger Mountain, Tukwila, and Renton Formations spans a geologic times

    © Kaegen Lau

  12. From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    - Subjects: Three exceptional specimens of amber, recovered from exposures on Tiger Mountain, Washington State; this is the first of two videos detailing the specimens' natural fluorescent and phosphorescent responses: 140 lumen LED light (yellow phosphor) was used in this entry. All were prepared by hand using a diamond needle file, 240 to 3,000 grit SiC sandpaper, and chromium oxide (ZAM compound) on a Selvyt microfiber cloth. - Brief Description of Deposit: Tiger Mountain amber occurs in lignitic coal seams, mainly contained within two Geologic Formations, namely the Tukwila and Renton

    © Kaegen Lau

  13. Barrelcactusaddict

    Claiborne Amber (Cockfield Fm., 41.3-38 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    1.4g translucent specimen measuring (mm) 16x15x10; one side presents an unbroken exterior, with slight remnants of sand, clay, and lignitic matrix. This material was recovered from the Malvern Clay Pits, east of Malvern, Arkansas. FTIR spectrum comparison of Claiborne amber to modern Shorea sp. resin points to the Dipterocarpaceae as a probable source for this middle Eocene-aged amber.

    © Kaegen Lau

  14. Barrelcactusaddict

    Claiborne Amber (Cockfield Fm., 41.3-38 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    4.1g rough specimen measuring (mm) 25x18x15. This is a section of a run, with successive layers grading from translucent to opaque; portions of the sand, clay, and lignitic matrix coats the exterior as depicted. This material was recovered from the Malvern Clay Pits, east of Malvern, Arkansas. FTIR spectrum comparison of Claiborne amber to modern Shorea sp. resin points to the Dipterocarpaceae as a probable source for this middle Eocene-aged amber.

    © Kaegen Lau

  15. Barrelcactusaddict

    Claiborne Amber (Cockfield Fm., 41.3-38 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    8.0g prepared rough specimen displaying a partially polished face, measuring (mm) 50x22x14; this piece is a transverse section, and displays numerous layers or flow lines with sequences of micro bubbles as well as sediments. This material was recovered from the Malvern Clay Pits, east of Malvern, Arkansas. FTIR spectrum comparison of Claiborne amber to modern Shorea sp. resin points to the Dipterocarpaceae as a probable source for this middle Eocene-aged amber.

    © Kaegen Lau

  16. Barrelcactusaddict

    Wyoming Amber (Lance Creek Fm., ~69-66 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Specimen weighing roughly 1g; it is dated to the Maastrichtian stage. Along with the other specimens in the related entry, it was recovered from lignite beds in far-northeastern Wyoming. There are some inclusions in this piece, although they are only of organic detritus.

    © Kaegen Lau

  17. Barrelcactusaddict

    Wyoming Amber (Lance Creek Fm., ~69-66 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    11.2g of amber dated to the Maastrichtian stage. This material was recovered from lignite beds in far-northeastern Wyoming; it generally has high clarity with few inclusions of organic detritus.

    © Kaegen Lau

  18. This weekend I went again to the Baltic Sea coast. This time my target were Miocene deposits of lignite in the cliffs around Chłapowo. This is one of the cliffs I climbed in vain: because the only thing I found has nothing to do with Miocene - it is a piece of a crinoid stem, so most probably Silurian.
  19. This is the most incredible piece of amber ever found. its so unbelievable, that nobody takes me serious when i post images of it anywhere. Facebook groups delete it and block me for posting fake fossils. its still attached to about a foot and a half of the original tree that the sap was secreted from. that in itself is very rare and one of a kind. this part that is wood, has high magnetic attraction. the fact that its included with creatures that have never been identified before, neither in amber or out is another unbelievable aspect of this piece. notice the two creatures in blue. bot
  20. I've been reading about the potential for lignite to spontaneously combust, which has gotten me thinking a bit. It's mentioned in the Wikipedia page for Lignite, as well as in paper such as this: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0010218002005539 I sometimes collect pieces of lignite from locations around the UK, if they preserve the shape and texture of the wood. Is there any risk of them suddenly bursting into flames? I'd have thought not, since I've never heard of such a thing happening, but then I suppose not many people collect these bits because they usua
  21. fifbrindacier

    Plant material

    Hi, i wish a good day for all of you. I've visited another new place where i could find miocene plant material in a ligniteous clay.It had rain for days there and the place is covered by vegetation, so i only looked on the border of a road and i found those two items. First photos are taken in daylight, others under a magnifying glass and artificial light. The scale is in centimeters. 1)
  22. In september of 2013 a small piece of history was made in a Late Cretaceous formation here in Tennessee. In that month, I discovered a whole tree which had been fossilized to Jet! Jet is an organic mineraloid substance which is something of a rarity. Other organic mineraloids would be Amber and Pearl. A Mineraloid is something not technically a true mineral because it is derived from matter of an organic nature. In this case, this Jet could be described as a fossil, a mineraloid, or even a semi-precious gemstone. Our ancestors have had quite a long relationship with Jet which stretches back at
  23. Tennessees Pride

    Possible Lignite Cone

    This specimen is late Cretaceous, formation is of marine origin. This perhaps could even be the central part of a depleted cone??? Pollen cone of some sort??? It has a hollow passing through it from end to end. It appears that it cracked somewhat and that surface area then filled in with sand.
  24. Tennessees Pride

    An Amazing Cretaceous Botanical

    This is a paleobotanical i have put the finishing touches on. It is extremely unusual for my area....the only one i actually know of. It simply isn't listed in any of prof. Berry's works, nor any later works by later botanists. It has been shown to 1 paleo botanist and 1 prof. of geology, neither gave me any feedback as to it's possible botanical source. It seems this one is pretty hard to i.d. The specimen comes from a late Cretaceous formation that is marine in origin, and very close to 80 mya. The source layer for this material appears to have been originally deposited as driftwood which in
  25. "Petrified", permineralized, silicified wood from Triassic Newark supergroup in Pennsylvania. Probably Araucarioxylon; same genus as in Arizona Petrified Forest national park. Some specimens have dark lignite on surface. For scale: silver discs in photo are USA quarter coins (0.995 inch or 2.42 centimeters in diameter).
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