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Found 12 results

  1. Tidgy's Dad

    Adam's Cambrian

    A rangeomorph holdfast trace fossil from the Ediacara formation, Rawnsley quartzite of the Flinders Range, South Australia. This specimen is Medusina mawsoni, so called because it was until recently thought to be a jellyfish, but is now believed to be the attachment point of a fractal rangeomorph as Charniodiscus is the point of anchorage for Charnia sp. This one may have been the holdfast point for some species of Rangea. The diameter of the outer circle is 1.5 cm and the fossil is estimated to be 555 million years old.
  2. Hello, This is a bit of a hail mary but I'm having a very difficult time acquiring a reference that I need to make some comparisons. I have been unsuccessful in acquiring a physical copy or pdf through my university's library, nor am I able to find a copy on the internet. There is a google books preview of this monograph available, but it conveniently has omitted all of the pages that have the descriptions that I need, and all of the images in it are copyrighted and concealed. The reference is: Blaker and Peel, 1997 Lower Cambrian Trilobites from North
  3. MarcoSr

    Oncolites

    Oncolites are algae colonies that form spheres or oval shapes as differentiated from Stromatolites which are algae colonies forming cylindrical or tube shapes. I recently acquired three end cuts that contain large oncolite colonies. On average these oncolites measure between a half and three quarters of an inch on the longest axis (11mm to 19mm). Many of these colonies have been preserved in these end cuts with a bit of iron oxide. All three pieces are a polished end cut with cross sectioning of colonies on the cut and polished face and colonies weathering out on the all-natural back side.
  4. While visiting family in Arizona and California I was able to figure out where the Marble Mountains trilobite quarry was located. It's not that far off the road system so I figured I'd give it a look see on my drive from central Arizona to Northern California. The location is only about 25 miles out of my way so why not. On my drive north I only had a few hours so this stop was mostly a fact finding trip. The view from the car windshield. The Marble Mountains are the lower hills to the left of center. The quarry area is just to the left of the gap between hills
  5. Wrangellian

    Olenellus or Mesonacis?

    From the Eager Fm near Fort Steele, BC, Lower Cambrian. Which one is this? @piranha Sorry for the poor photo, I'll try again if necessary. It is no more than 2cm wide.
  6. Dpaul7

    Trilobite Fossil Redlichia

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Redlichia chinensis Trilobite Balang Formation, Hunan province, China Lower Cambrian Redlichia is a genus of redlichiid trilobite in the family Redlichiidae, with large to very large species (up to 35 centimetres or 14 inches long). Fossils of various species are found in Lower Cambrian (Toyonian)-aged marine strata from China, Korea, Pakistan, the Himalayas, Iran, Spain, southern Siberia, and Antarctica, and from Middle Cambrian (Ordian)-aged marine strata of Australia. Redlichia has a rather flat and thinly calcified dorsal exoskeleton of inverted egg-shaped outline, about 1½× longe
  7. Dpaul7

    Trilobite Fossil Redlichia

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Redlichia chinensis Trilobite Balang Formation, Hunan province, China Lower Cambrian Redlichia is a genus of redlichiid trilobite in the family Redlichiidae, with large to very large species (up to 35 centimetres or 14 inches long). Fossils of various species are found in Lower Cambrian (Toyonian)-aged marine strata from China, Korea, Pakistan, the Himalayas, Iran, Spain, southern Siberia, and Antarctica, and from Middle Cambrian (Ordian)-aged marine strata of Australia. Redlichia has a rather flat and thinly calcified dorsal exoskeleton of inverted egg-shaped outline, about 1½× longe
  8. Tidgy's Dad

    Archaeocyathid

    About 515 million years old, this archaeocyathid shows excellent specimens with both lateral and vertical sections. The internal septa separating the internal wall from the external wall can clearly be seen and the central cavity. Archaeocyatha
  9. Not 100% sure what it is - could be either a rare Yunnanozoon lividum Hou, Ramsköld & Bergström, 1991, a Hemichordate or - more likely Haikouella lanceolata Chen, Huang & Li, 1999, a Chordate. Even Haikouichthys ercaicunensis Shu, Conway Morris, Han & Zhang, a primitive fish, is still a posibility. Under UV light Reconstruction of Haikouella (from Wikipedia): Reconstruction of Haikouichthys (from Wikipedia): Lit.: Degan Shu, et al. (2003) A New Species of Yunnanozoan with Implications for Deuterostome Evo
  10. araucaria1959

    Graptolites ? (Chengjiang Biota ?)

    Hello, here are two different specimens I bought 2 – 3 years ago from a trustworthy Chinese dealer via ebay; the specimens were labelled as lower Cambrian (Chengjiang biota): Quiongszhusi Section Heilinpu Formation Locality : Maotianshan They look like graptolites from the order Graptoloidea. However, the earliest graptoloidea are known from the lowermost ordovician. Meanwhile, a pterobranchia from the order Rhabdopleurida was described from the Atdabanian of the Chengjiang biota (Galeaplumosus) as the earliest pterobranchia; however, this is not a graptolite, only a close relative. Thus
  11. The United States Geological Survey Tenth Annual Report (1889), Part 1- Geology page 511 to page 763, also includes 20 fossil plates, one folded USA map with Lower Cambrian exposures (large scale but gets you started). Invertebrates found and trilobites. The text describes the characteristics to identify Lower Cambrian invertebrates (1889 terminology, so some may be corrected after this was published). The map of the USA shows outcrops known from New England to Nevada, along the Appalachians and heavily covered for Wisconsin and some Minnesota. Those living in the Wisconsin and Minneso
  12. Yunnanocephalus yunnanensis (Mansuy, 1912) Trilobite fossil with soft Tissue About 2.5 cm Preserved legs and gills. Lower Cambrian Chengjiang Biota, Qiongzhusi Formation, Maotianshan Shales, Yunnan Province, China I looked at this closer once the specimen arrived last week and I found a whole bunch of gills shown along some other exposed exopods. The item coming out of cephalon top was actually another endopod. Here is another specimen (whole) just to show you the whole Yunnanocephalus: EDIT: Images removed by topic starter
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