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  1. Kikokuryu

    Elrhaz Crocodylomorph Fang?

    While I was sorting through my collection of croc fossils, I came across these Elrhaz Formation teeth I bought 6 months ago and never did figure out what they were. I assume they are croc and not some kind of fish, though I could be wrong. I've never seen these apart from the one source I purchased them from. I've been told they were Sarcosuchus, then Kaprosuchus, then Suchomimus. Pretty sure it's not Sarcosuchus, and the images I can find of Kaprosuchus don't seem to match. Suchomimus, I don't know, but my gut feeling is, no, I've seen dozens of Suchomimus and fake-Sucho crocs, an
  2. Troodon

    New Abelisaurid from Brazil

    The attached paper describes a new Abelisaurid from the lower Cretaceous of Brazil: Spectrovenator ragei . Its a good paper to keep as a reference source when trying to identify material from other geographic areas like Morocco http://sciencepress.mnhn.fr/fr/periodiques/comptes-rendus-palevol/19/6
  3. A few weeks back the Paleontological Society of Austin went out on one of our monthly field trips. The weather was still quite warm and we decided to keep it closer to home so no one would be to wrung out when we were done. We are hopefully at the tail end of a rather brutal drought with constant triple digit temps that started back in June. We picked three sites within 90 minutes of Austin that took us up thru the Glen Rose Formation, bottom to top. We started at a site in the Lower Member known as the micro zone. Fossils big enough to see from a standing position are few but if you get dow
  4. I have some teeth from Cognac area to ID. Selachians found are Parvodus, Polyacrodus, Lissodus, Hybodus, Hybodontidae, Rhinobatidae but I don't know them. Is someone knows this fauna ? Here are 4 pics done with my phone, but perhaps I have to try with an APN... They are very very small. It is written "Portlandian" on the pics but the right stage is Berriasian. I think I have 2 different species in my collection, and I must do a lot of pics Thanks for you help. Coco
  5. Siamraptor suwati a new Carcharodontosaurian, a first from Southeast Asia, from the lower Cretaceous of Thailand, is described in the attached paper National Geographic press release https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/2019/10/huge-new-shark-toothed-dinosaur-siamraptor-found-in-thailand/ Cosmos Press release https://cosmosmagazine.com/palaeontology/early-cretaceous-predator-discovered-in-thailand Smithsonian Press release https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/newly-discovered-dinosaur-was-giant-shark-to
  6. K-boy Cachers

    I Finally Found One!

    I've known about these little dudes for years, but they've always been like the Yeti to me: heard of them, believed in their existence, but never laid eyes on one for myself. Well, this evening I decided to accompany the fam on a walk/bike ride at the park that is two blocks down the road (referenced in previous topics/posts). I've been finding some interesting coral specimens down there lately and was looking fairly close to the ground, somewhat stooping against the gentle slope. . . . and there she was! In all of her 9 mm of chalky limestone beauty! My wife's comment was
  7. K-boy Cachers

    Think it's a tooth, but should it be?

    17 August 2019 Shark tooth? Lower Cretaceous - Walnut formation Western Bell County, Texas, USA I found this in the nearby park where I've found many of the normal central Texas fossils over the years (oxytropidocerous, salenia, parasmilia, heart urchins, gastropods, snails, etc.). My eyes tell me this thing looks a lot like a shark tooth. But my brain is trying to get me to disagree. Here's why I'm stumped: 1. While it makes sense that shark tooth fossils COULD be found in this area, along with all of the other sea life, we aren't known for turning up ma
  8. K-boy Cachers

    A Cross-section of Something, Perhaps?

    This peculiar thing caught my eye while I was out looking for urchins, clams, gastropods and all of the other bountiful fossil blessings of Central Texas. This was in an intermittent creek cut in the Comanche Peak formation, Lower Cretaceous period, western Bell County, Texas. The scale in the background is inches (sorry, no metric device readily available). The oval shape of the fossil is 1.5 cm by 1 cm. All of the lines you see making up the fossil are crystalized sediment within the limestone matrix. My 8 year old was excited about how "sparkly" it looked under the flashlight.
  9. https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-12/uoc-to121418.php
  10. The Amateur Paleontologist

    Chinese bird with preserved (?)lungs

    This is rather interesting - a specimen of the bird Archeorhynchus spathula (STM7-11) from the Lower Cretaceous Jiufotang Formation (northeastern China) has been shown to have probable evidence of preserved lungs Wang, X., O’Connor, J. K., Maina, J. N., Pan, Y., Wang, M., Wang, Y., Zheng, X., & Zhou, Z. (2018). Archaeorhynchus preserving significant soft tissue including probable fossilized lungs. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 201805803. Wang etal 2018 Archaeorhynchus lungs.pdf
  11. I found this plate of oysters I don't know the name of in the Lower Cretaceous Grayson Formation exposure at Rayzor Ranch in Denton Texas. I showed it to @trempie4 in August and @Jeffrey P when he was here in September and neither one wanted it so I finally took it home myself. As I was exposing more of the oysters I first noticed these nice little serpula on and around the oysters. Then I noticed something I haven't seen before. i wonder if it could be some kind of feeding trace. Any ideas?
  12. Baddadcp

    Lower Cretaceous form

    Found this little item in my rock bar that has me stumped. Has too much form to be a "concretion", but not enough to try to get a bone ID. It came from a Maryland Creek in the Arundel "formation" Potomac "group".
  13. Baddadcp

    Arundel/ Patuxent find

    I will leave this for your interpretation without comment.
  14. Baddadcp

    Ironstone from MD

    I will leave this without comment also, for your interpretation.
  15. A couple of relatively nice Oxytropidoceras sp ammonites I found on a spring hunt with the Dallas Palaeontological Society to Oliver Creek in Denton County, Texas a couple of years ago.
  16. An interesting discovery in Japan https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2018/02/04/national/science-health/cranial-bones-three-horned-dinosaurs-found-western-japan/
  17. I saw this article earlier today. If someone has already posted it I give my apologies for reposting it, but I think it is an interesting article on: “A diverse mammal-dominated, footprint assemblage from wetland deposits in the Lower Cretaceous of Maryland” It is published in Nature. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-18619-w
  18. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Tylostoma tumidum Gastropod cast SITE LOCATION: Mills County, Texas, USA TIME PERIOD: Lower Cretaceous (100-145 million years ago) Data: Tylostomatidae is an extinct family of fossil sea snails, marine gastropod molluscs in the superfamily Stromboidea, the true conchs and their allies. Genera within the family Tylostomatidae include: Tylostoma, the type genus. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Gastropoda Order: Littorinimorpha (Infraorder) Family: †Tylostomati
  19. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Tylostoma tumidum Gastropod cast SITE LOCATION: Mills County, Texas, USA TIME PERIOD: Lower Cretaceous (100-145 million years ago) Data: Tylostomatidae is an extinct family of fossil sea snails, marine gastropod molluscs in the superfamily Stromboidea, the true conchs and their allies. Genera within the family Tylostomatidae include: Tylostoma, the type genus. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Gastropoda Order: Littorinimorpha (Infraorder) Family: †Tylostomati
  20. Dpaul7

    Loriolia echinoid Fossil a.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Loriolia echinoid Fossil SITE LOCATION: Comal County, Texas, USA TIME PERIOD: Lower Cretaceous (100-145 million years ago) Data: Loriolia is a genus of extinct sea urchins from the Emiratiidae family. The Emiratiidae are a family of extinct sea urchins (Echinoidea) of the order Phymosomatoida. The Phymosomatoida are an order of sea urchins, found in Europe, North America, North Africa and the Middle East. They are distinguished from other sea urchins by the presence of large fused plates on top of the feeding lantern. The test is usuall
  21. Dpaul7

    Loriolia echinoid Fossil a.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Loriolia echinoid Fossil SITE LOCATION: Comal County, Texas, USA TIME PERIOD: Lower Cretaceous (100-145 million years ago) Data: Loriolia is a genus of extinct sea urchins from the Emiratiidae family. The Emiratiidae are a family of extinct sea urchins (Echinoidea) of the order Phymosomatoida. The Phymosomatoida are an order of sea urchins, found in Europe, North America, North Africa and the Middle East. They are distinguished from other sea urchins by the presence of large fused plates on top of the feeding lantern. The test is usuall
  22. Dpaul7

    Tapes decepta Mollusk Cast a.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Tapes decepta Mollusk Cast SITE LOCATION: Glen Rose Formation, Bandera County, Texas, USA TIME PERIOD: Lower Cretaceous (100-145 million years ago) Data: Clams and their relatives (oysters, scallops, and mussels) are often called bivalves (or bivalved mollusks) because their shell is composed of two parts called valves. Bivalves have a long history. Their fossils first appear in rocks that date to the middle of the Cambrian Period, about 510 million years ago. Although the group became increasingly abundant about 400 million years ago d
  23. Dpaul7

    Tapes decepta Mollusk Cast a.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Tapes decepta Mollusk Cast SITE LOCATION: Glen Rose Formation, Bandera County, Texas, USA TIME PERIOD: Lower Cretaceous (100-145 million years ago) Data: Clams and their relatives (oysters, scallops, and mussels) are often called bivalves (or bivalved mollusks) because their shell is composed of two parts called valves. Bivalves have a long history. Their fossils first appear in rocks that date to the middle of the Cambrian Period, about 510 million years ago. Although the group became increasingly abundant about 400 million years ago d
  24. Dpaul7

    Heteraster texanus Echinoid a.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Heteraster texanus Echinoid SITE LOCATION: Commanche Park Formation, Mills County, Texas, USA TIME PERIOD: Lower Cretaceous (100-145 million years ago) Data: Heteraster is an extinct genus of sea urchins belonging to the family Toxasteridae. These slow-moving shallow infaunal deposit feeder-detritivores lived during the Cretaceous period. Fossils of this family have been found in the sediments of Algeria, Egypt, France, Hungary, Mexico, Peru, Portugal, Serbia and Montenegro, Spain, Switzerland and Yemen. Kingdom: Animalia
  25. Dpaul7

    Heteraster texanus Echinoid a.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Heteraster texanus Echinoid SITE LOCATION: Commanche Park Formation, Mills County, Texas, USA TIME PERIOD: Lower Cretaceous (100-145 million years ago) Data: Heteraster is an extinct genus of sea urchins belonging to the family Toxasteridae. These slow-moving shallow infaunal deposit feeder-detritivores lived during the Cretaceous period. Fossils of this family have been found in the sediments of Algeria, Egypt, France, Hungary, Mexico, Peru, Portugal, Serbia and Montenegro, Spain, Switzerland and Yemen. Kingdom: Animalia
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