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Found 366 results

  1. Oreodont

    I was recently given an Oreodont skull that someone had started but he gave up on it after breaking it into 5 pieces. One of my relatives who knows him was talking about how I’m into fossils and the guy just gives it to him so he gave it to me! So it’s my next project. Even though it’s not in the best shape I’m still excited to get it! I love prepping fossils even though I can only do it on my days off.
  2. Mammal Bone ID from Rare Location

    Hello everyone, I was hoping someone could help me with the identification with this bone that I found at the Royal Peacock Opal Mine in the Virgin Valley, Humboldt County, Northeastern Nevada, USA. Geologic age is the Miocene. Bones are very rarely found in this area. It is mostly opal, petrified wood, and fossilized wood. I am guessing this came from a land mammal. Possibly a camel. Does anyone have a better idea what it could be? I donated this bone to the mine owner due to its rarity. I thought it should stay where it was found. PS: In the next few days I will post a couple of other rare fossils found at the mine by the owner's son (Jake Anderson).
  3. Mammal molar

    I’d like to apologise firstly in case my item shouldn’t be on this site as I doubt it qualifies as a fossil. This tooth was sticking out of the ground in my back garden in Worthing, South East England. I’m hoping someone might be able to help me identify it as I can find nothing on the net that looks similar and my children and I would like to know what may have been lurking in our garden in years gone by. As shown in the photos, the tooth is 25mm x 12mm x 12mm and has a strange array of serrations and points. The tooth has a hollow back with no root so I’m guessing it’s a milk tooth.
  4. Vertebra?

    I found what appears to me to a mammal vertebra of some sort. I'm a newb, so any help would be appreciated. Found in the Texas Hill Country, less than a foot down.
  5. Just a bit of fun with this garden find. Mrs R got me this week gardening because our friend from Brooklyn is visiting in a couple of weeks time. I was just putting some gravel on the topsoil of my pots to stop the birds digging out our succulent plant . I the spotted a small fossil bone fragments? The gravel is Scottish but I can’t at this point say any more than this. So the question is what if anything can we discern from this small piece of fossil bone? Archosaurs, mammal or fish? Just for fun and thanks all . Bobby
  6. Carnivorous mammal skull ID

    Could someone please help me identify this mammal skull? It has no associated geographic information.
  7. Lance fm Mammal Tooth?

    I just "rediscovered" what I believe to be a cretaceous mammal tooth, I placed it with the triceratops and edmontosaurus spit teeth thinking it was a sliver of one. Taking a closer look I think it could be the crown of a small mammal's tooth. I want to know what you think (It's about 7 millimeters long).
  8. Peace River Incisor?

    Found this on my 2018 trip to Florida, I believe it is a rodent incisor and I would like to confirm that. And if it is, does anyone have any indication as to what variety it belongs to? It's about 2 cm long.
  9. Hey everyone, I found this fossil last February on the Peace River, I believe I posted it with a bunch of my other finds from that trip a while ago and the ID came up inconclusive. I was hoping the folks on the forum could help me out with this one again. It's about 3.5 cm in diameter and I first thought it belonged to a glypodont but I'm not so sure.
  10. The largest carnivorous land mammal ever with a jaw similar in size to that of a rhino was found in Kenya and described by researchers from the University of Ohio. https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-04/ou-ffi041119.php
  11. Mammalian jaw fossil

    This is a partial fossil jaw bone of an unidentified mammal species found in a cave in Guangxi. Any idea which mammal is that? 丨丨
  12. Request help in ID for Dallas 1968 fossil

    I'm new to this forum, and would like to request help in identifying a fossil that has been in my possession for about 50 years. When I was a child growing up in Dallas, Texas, my father was a landscape architect who often visited job sites and had excellent relations with various sub-contractors. One day, he brought home a fossil "dinosaur bone" from a private residential swimming pool construction project. It certainly does appear to be a fossil bone from a large animal, and one can even see fossilized marrow in a hole on the specimen - but whether it's from a dinosaur or a mammal, I have no idea and would like some help with here. The specimen is approximately 90mm long, 60mm wide, and 50mm high. I haven't weighed it. Although I've worked in museums for much of my professional career (and so I'm motivated both by scientific curiosity as well as a strict adherence to scientific rigor), I've somehow never brought this specimen for any expert to identify. Don't know why - just didn't. My father is still living and a couple of weeks ago I asked him if he remembers any additional information on exactly where, at what depth, etc. this specimen was found. Unfortunately, he does not remember any additional information or context. I'm including some photos here, but of course would be happy to provide additional ones, or to provide any other information that would prove helpful in identifying this specimen. And thank you very much in advance.
  13. Peace River Incisor

    Finally made it out to the Peace River this weekend. Tammy and I spent a day canoeing down the river on Friday checking some of our favorite spots between Brownville Park and Canoe Outpost in Arcadia to see if the river was low enough to guide a group of teen/pre-teen SCUBAnauts for a fossil hunting trip on Saturday. Though the river is still about a foot higher than I'd like it to be, the group got lucky when they planned this trip some six months ago. The river gauge at Arcadia is the lowest it's been this year and still dropping--though rain is expected for Tuesday so that could put a halt to the drop if it is a heavy rain. Kept a few items I would not otherwise have if I didn't need them for for a bit of fossil show-and-tell with the group before our trip on Saturday. Gave everything away but two items: a tiny laminid shark vertebra that is just a hair over 7 mm (I'm surprised it didn't pass through my 1/4" mesh sifting screen) and the other was my trip-maker as it is something of a mystery and a novel find for me. It appears to be a fully-rooted mammal incisor about 2" (52 mm) long and the crown is about 0.6" (15 mm) at its widest. When I pulled it from my sifting screen, my first thought was that it might be a camelid incisor. I've seen similar images online now that I'm back home with access to the internet. As this is something new for me, I'd love some confirmation. It would be great to hear from someone with more experience in finds similar to this like @Harry Pristis Cheers. -Ken
  14. Mammal tooth fragment .. Savannah River

    Hi There, Picked up this tooth fragment while sifting on the Savannah river. The sifter always seems to pull up cool stuff. First time in a long time that I brought out the heavier gear and my arms were dying by the end of the day. It looks too robust for a tapir tooth (?) and the chewing surfaces (what is left of them) feels off. I know the fauna is similar in the Florida Peace river. This would be Pliocene-Pleistocene @digit @Shellseeker does this strike your fancy right off as something recognizable. It may be too much of a fragment. Thanks, Brett
  15. Large unknown from Florida

    Found a large chunk of bone while fossil hunting in Florida earlier this month. Found in a tributary to the Peace River near Arcadia. Not sure there is enough left to get a useful identification, but figured I would post and see how it goes. The chunk is roughly 5 x 4 x 2.5 inches, the grid underneath is quarter inch squares.
  16. Big Brook Deer / Antelope

    My daughter found this at Big Brook NJ today. Measures 3.5" in length. Looks like has socket for 2 other joints. Is this a modern white tail deer? The blackness has me thinking it may have some age to it.
  17. Iowa mammal bone ID help

    Hi everyone, I found what I think are a lumbar vertebra and an astragalus bone. I'm not sure how old they are, but they both seem pretty weathered and possibly mineralized. Both appear to be from bovids(?). These were found on a river sandbar around Ames, IA after recent spring flooding. Does anyone know how to distinguish bison from cattle bones? The vertebra is 35 cm wide, 10 cm long, and 8 cm tall. The astragalus is 7.4 cm long, 5.5 cm wide, and 4 cm deep.
  18. I found this bone on a Tampa Bay Beach, Florida and the next week I found an identical one but left it. When I first scooped it out of the water I thought it was a molar from a manatee. After looking at it I saw it didn't have a root and was it a joint bone? From the weight and color I think it's modern but curious to find out what I found and what animal. (ruler is in inches) Any help or ideas welcome and appreciated.
  19. New Zealand Glacier possible mammal fossil

    Hey everyone, I got this interesting mammal bone piece (about 3 inches across) that was found in an area with a glacier and no live animals around. Could it have originated from within the glacier or is it a modern bone? What type of bone is it and what animal did it come from? Thanks everyone!
  20. Fossil identification

    This was also found on the beach in south Texas. Thank you!
  21. https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-03/ou-rrb031519.php https://www.app.pan.pl/archive/published/app64/app005682018.pdf
  22. I wanted to share some pictures from a recent trip to SW Florida. I grew up in FL but I didn’t do any fossil hunting until I moved to CA and found Shark Tooth Hill. I was really excited to get out and find some Florida fossils. Unfortunately, the Peace River was too high to hunt so we have to explore some smaller rivers that weren’t too flooded. That worked out for me because we found some great fossils! Some members of the forum were nice enough to show me around. I sent out a box of STH finds to my FL friends to get some fossil goodwill going. I think some of them were posted for ID in another thread. I really enjoyed what to me was easy digging in the Florida creeks, it was kind of hot out for February but the weather was great for being in the water. I was really surprised about the diversity of fossils found, at one point on the bank we found an area that had both land and marine fossils in the same layer. You could walk around and just pick cool stuff up. That is where I found the Giant Armadillo jaw section that won the fossil of the month. It was a nice contrast to STH where you tend to find the same type of fossils over and over. I hope you enjoy the pictures.
  23. Took a trip to a nearby mineral and gem shop that sometimes had fossils. To my delight, the shop owner showed me a sword made up of fossil bones. It's unclear what bones were used but the shop owner said it was probably mammalian, perhaps mammoth or something from the ice age. The sword was actually pretty durable and could be used as a weapon (at risk of breaking the fossils of course). Certainly the strangest fossil I've seen this year!
  24. La Brea Tar Pits Bone Fragment

    Here’s an interesting one. I docent at the Page Museum at the La Brea Tar Pits, and while I was talking to some visitors one of them gave me a piece of bone fragment his father found (among many other easier to identify pieces) at the tar pits before the museum was created. I have showed to some of the researchers at la Brea, and their guess was that it was a tibia fragment from some mammal. So far based on my own comparisons, it seems closest to a dire wolf, but if anyone else has any other ideas, I’d love to hear them. Thanks!
  25. Wanted to Confirm this ID

    Hi all! I found this jaw section in Wyoming's White River fm. last year and was told it was likely from a dog (hesperocyon potentially). I wanted to confirm it with some of the people on the forum as there's not a lot left on it aside from part of a tooth, hopefully someone can affirm my hope that this piece actually belongs to a canid.
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