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Found 426 results

  1. Hi, just going through some rocks I brought back from Norfolk, UK, thinking quite a few may be fossils (I didn't have long so just grabbed anything I thought looked suspiciously organic by intuition) and as it turns out I think I was quite correct in a number of cases - I think I have quite a few pieces of whale and and a few little bits of mammoth tooth. Trying to confirm this to myself led to a lot of reading and learning online about the local geological formations involved and also whale anatomy, both new topics for me which I always enjoy delving into - part of the enjoyment of fossil hunting for me - I'm less of someone looking for beautiful specimens for display (though I'm not going to turn those down!) and more someone who loves the detective work of trying to identify obscure parts and recreate some aspect of the vanished world before us from its traces. And searching through whale anatomy and what these weird chunks could be I came across a picture of a whale periotic and realised that the weird little pot structure I had was almost definitely one of these, which if I am correct is good because I believe they are one part of a fragmented whale anatomy that is quite diagnostic. Also I then realised that a strangely hooked piece I found right next to it could well be the tympanic! The preservation here is unusual because many theorise that these kind of whale fossils were first laid down in sandstone in the Miocene when Norfolk was covered with a shallow warm sea, and then later in the Pliocene and early Pleistocene when temperatures dropped sea levels dropped too and the area became land (part of the reason the geology of this area is interesting is the constant transgression and regression of the sea over a few million years), these Miocene rocks were eroded away and the harder fossils reworked into new estuarine or nearshore sediments of this era, often but not always with a layer of hard iron-rich concretion coating them which helped protect them (I guess one question would be, is there anyway of easily removing this hard concretion layer?) So if I am right, these are bones from Miocene whales (many showing signs of shark damage), reburied in the Pliocene / Early Pleistocene and then finally eroded out again in the modern day - quite a journey! Anyway, enough background, for starters I'd love to see what people think about this periotic / tympanic. Am I right? Here's a summary of my findings (note I used a pic of dolphin periotic someone posted here for comparison so I hope that isn't too cheeky)
  2. Hello everyone,I've recently acquired this piece of unprepped oreodont jaw section and want to do some prep work on it However I've realized that the jaw looks quite fragmented and is afraid that it might break apart into thousands of fragments. I had only prepped a knightia before and I am kinda confused what I should do now.
  3. Oreodont

    I was recently given an Oreodont skull that someone had started but he gave up on it after breaking it into 5 pieces. One of my relatives who knows him was talking about how I’m into fossils and the guy just gives it to him so he gave it to me! So it’s my next project. Even though it’s not in the best shape I’m still excited to get it! I love prepping fossils even though I can only do it on my days off.
  4. White River fm. tooth

    Hi everyone, I found this tooth over the summer in the White River formation of Wyoming. When I stumbled upon it, the tooth was already "exploded" into several pieces, so I glued it in place and dug around it, taking it out as a cemented chunk of dirt. At first I thought it was a young Archaeotherium canine, then I wasn't so sure and thought maybe Hyaenodon, I could be wrong and may not be predator at all as I know the rhinos, oreodonts and titanotheres all have canine teeth. A good amount of the crown is preserved along with several pieces of the root, however it is not complete and may be missing some vital pieces which could help us answer the question. the crown is around an inch and a half in length.
  5. Tooth or rock

    Found on the surface in Sacramento Co. CA.
  6. Help IDing tooth from China

    Hello everybody! I got those tooth from the seller in China. There are 2 tooth from Miocene - Gansu, and 1 jaw come from Harbin river bank - Heilongjiang province. But the seller don't have label for them. Wondering if anyone can identify it. Thanks, Le
  7. 11-02-19 lake macconaughy bone

    Hi I found this on the beach at lake mcconaughy in Nebraska which means it could be Pleistocene or Miocene but most likely from the Ash Hollow formation. I’m pretty clueless when it comes to bones and could use some help figuring out what this is. Thanks! P.s. I did the flame test and it’s fully mineralized.
  8. Mammal tooth!

    Hi all! Here's a tooth find from Monmouth, NJ. It's clearly a mammal of some kind, possibly cenozoic, but does anyone know what kind? Thanks!
  9. Peace River ID

    Made a quick trip to the peace river today near Bartow today. Nothing too crazy but did find two things that I need some help on. My best guess on the first one is dolphin / whale tooth, but I haven't found many of them and the crown is kind of weird... maybe broken and then smoothed over by the river? The second is a very small fossil. I have found very similar ones before but never bothered to get them ID'd. My best guess is some kind of small mammal tooth. It is so small that I couldn't get a great picture with my iphone. The ends of the fossil (not pictured) are zig zagged, carrying on the patter from the sides (kind of like horse teeth). Definitely not ray dental plate like I originally thought. Any help is greatly appreciated! Thank you.
  10. Possible mammal tooth of some kind?

    At first I thought it was the tip of a rib, but I see little swirls of enamel inside like a horse - though this doesn't look like the couple of horse teeth I've found. Perhaps another mammal of some kind? Myrtle Beach.
  11. Florida Pleistocene Giant Ground Sloth Vertebra?

    I found this vertebra in Bartow county Florida along with some other mammal Pleistocene fossils. It was found in close proximity to some deer antler pieces and Mastodon incisor pieces. I found an almost identical vertebra online that said that it was a giant ground sloth vertebrae. The piece is heavily mineralized. Any opinions on this vertebra would be greatly appreciated. It has a diameter of 2 1/2 inches and a width of 1 1/2 inches.
  12. Who's mouth do I belong in?

    My dad collection of Indian artifacts Crystal's and all kinds of other things was passed to me when he passed. And there was this tooth I been tryin to find out what animal it belongs to and I was lead to this site. I know it's a molar and by what Google says it's a mammals. Can someone help me find what mammal it is?
  13. Please help ID this little guy

    Hello folks. I'm back after an extended break. I've found some really cool fossils on my land in southern Missouri, Texas county, USA. Just a few miles south of cabool. A seasonal stream flows through my land exposing some cool finds, not to mention- the heavy rains are washing the topsoil away. From the hundreds of artifacts I've collected, this spot must have been an indigenous settlement. My best guess is that this item was in the hands of those early Americans. I can see why, this is my 2nd most favorite of the collection. Please help me identify what this is. Any help would be greatly appreciated. FYI, I have overcast skies at the moment and very limited internet access. These pics are the best I can do. Mm measurements are roughly 66mm x 38mm x 25mm
  14. Found on the eastern shore of the bay.
  15. Leg Bones

    These pictures are one a fossil a work friend gave to me. He said he dug this up, on the opposite side of where I dig, twenty years ago when the plant first opened (I was 2 to 3). I'm thinking medium sized mammal, somewhere in the cloven hoof family. any ideas?
  16. North Carolina Teeth??

    Found these fossils in the river in North Carolina. No idea what they are, doesn't look to be shark teeth.
  17. Is This A Whale Vertebra?

    This piece was found in a pleistocene deposit off the New Jersey coast and was labeled as Whale, hard to find any comparisons so I am unsure this is the case though its likely, any help on this will be appreciated. measures 3 x3 x 2 1/2 in
  18. Mystery Mini Bone Valley Mammal Toe

    Hello everyone, I was looking through a small bag of finds from a year ago from the little digging area outside when I visited the museam in Polk county Florida, and came across this tiny mammal toe that I don't really know what animal it came from, any and all help is appreciated
  19. mammal canines identification

    hello everyone, recently I found this lot of canines for sale. the owner knows nothing about them. Now I know that it's really difficult to identify a genus from a canine tooth, but maybe there is someone with more experience than me about florida pleistocene fossils that can help me. thank you for anyone one who can help me.
  20. hello everyone, a few days ago surfing the internet I came across a site of fossils from asia. scrolling through the various offers I noticed this skull, the description reported only that it belonged to an unspecified myocene carnivore. All in all the price was quite low for what seems to be the quality of the piece. To a more careful investigation it would seem a hyaenidae even if the present matrix makes identification quite difficult, however still there is something that does not convince me. the matrix seems intentionally put to cover part of the skull. What do you think about it? Even if the price is cheap it's still to high for my poor pockets, so noway I would ever buy it. However it intrigued me alot.
  21. Broken mammal tooth

    Found a week ago in an area that produces a mix of miocene - pleistocene fossils. I thought of at least 3 animals for this half tooth. Hopefully someone will recognize a distinctive feature.
  22. Pleistocene tampa bay mammal id

    Hi guys I recently acquired this unidentified tooth and was wondering whether anyone could help me Id it, it’s pleistocene from tampa bay in Florida thanks it’s just over an inch in length
  23. New Cretaceous Period Mammal Discovered

    Article Link: http://www.sci-news.com/paleontology/origolestes-lii-07880.html Enjoy!
  24. Unidentified Jaw, Mammal?

    Hello everyone. Ive got a tough one for you guys. So I have a fossil jaw with a single canine tooth that I’ve had in my collection for a couple years. It was a gift from my boyfriend, so no locality. I tried to have it identified on the fossil forum Facebook group when I first got it, but no one knew what it was for sure. I had a paleontologist post a response and this is what he had to say: ”Hi Marielle Krenzelak, I'm a palaeontologist but I'm not entirely sure what you have there. I'm not concerned with the material that others don't think is bone. It looks to me like the canine tooth (the only tooth you have) is broken. I think the jaw is mammalian based on its overall morphology. I don't think that it is a horse, based on the shape of the symphysis (area where the left and right jaws would have connected) and its position relative to the canine. It is interesting that it has a long post-canine diastema (the smooth area after the canine and before the alveoli, or holes, where the next teeth would have gone). I also think the other suggestions (boar and goat) are also incorrect, again based on the length of the diastema and the shape of the symphysis. Finally, the age constraint someone gave you of less than 20,000 years is not supportable. I've worked on mammals back to ~ 55,000,000 years that have similar preservation. Barring that, I'm just not sure what it is you have there.” So I thought I’d try again on this forum to see if anyone has any idea what it might be? I know we have many experts and actual paleontologists on here. If anyone could help me out, it would be greatly appreciated. Here is a link to the post about it on Facebook in case anyone is in the fossil forum Facebook group and wants to take a look at it: https://www.facebook.com/groups/135008766530423/permalink/1768488489849101?sfns=mo Thank you for any thoughts or insights you have to share!
  25. I was going to post this in the fossil of the month for July, until I looked at the date it was collected...mid-June. My, how time flies. Last Spring I found a nice Eocene mammal tooth site west of home. In a few hours I collected a few teeth and made a note to return soon. I did so in June and spent another few hours there (as well as exploring other nearby sites). I collected about 20 complete isolated mammal teeth and two jaws. Here is the better of the two. I am pretty tickled with not only this specimen, but this site as well. It will be a lot of fun to keep going back to. That is my fingerprint for scale. The front of the jaw is facing left; the missing jaw joint is on the right. Notice that the first tooth on the left (third premolar) is taller than the others, and that the third molar (right-most tooth) is quite long. As far as I know, these make it a primate. Not a monkey, mind you, but something along the lines of more primitive primates, such as tarsiers. (Then again, the current classification of these things is quite complicated and it may not be a primate at all). There was quite a collection of these things and similar beasts here during the Eocene, mostly quite small and only known from teeth and jaws. so in FOTM format: Date of Discovery... 15 June 2019 Scientific and/or Common Name... Primate Geologic Age or Geologic Formation... Wind River Fm., early Eocene State, Province, or Region Found... Wyoming Photos of Find (Please limit to 4 clear, cropped, and well-lit images.) see below. (If prepped, before and after photos are required, please.)
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