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Found 18 results

  1. Barrelcactusaddict

    Blakeburn Amber (Allenby Fm., 52.5-48 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    “Blakeburn Amber” Coalmont, British Columbia Allenby Fm. (Princeton Group) 52.5-48 Ma Weight: 0.8g Dimensions: 16x16x13mm Lighting: Longwave UV The final entry in a series of ten, detailing various rare ambers from European, Asian, and North American localities. This is a fine example of an in-situ piece of amber. The matrix is high-volatile type B bituminous coal, which contains small portions of methane; it has a bright vitreous luster due to it containing over 90% vitrinite (a “maceral

    © Kaegen Lau

  2. Barrelcactusaddict

    Blakeburn Amber (Allenby Fm., 52.5-48 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    “Blakeburn Amber” Coalmont, British Columbia Allenby Fm. (Princeton Group) 52.5-48 Ma Weight: 0.8g Dimensions: 16x16x13mm Lighting: 140lm LED The final entry in a series of ten, detailing various rare ambers from European, Asian, and North American localities. This is a fine example of an in-situ piece o

    © Kaegen Lau

  3. From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    9.2g amber from Tiger Mountain, King County, WA. This amber is middle to late Eocene in age (about 41.3-33.9 Ma), and comes from coal seams along the boundary of the upper Tukwila/lower Renton Formations.

    © Kaegen Lau

  4. From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    3.0g of amber from the 9.2g lot depicted in the associated entry. This amber is middle to late Eocene in age (about 41.3-33.9 Ma), and comes from coal seams along the boundary of the upper Tukwila/lower Renton Formations. It is found in association with Pinus sp. and Metasequoia occidentalis remains, which were the most probable sources of the amber; association with Metasequoia sp. is even more prevalent among the amber from the Blakeburn Mine (i.e., amber from the Allenby Fm. near Coalmont), as Metasequoia imprints are especially abundant at that site.

    © Kaegen Lau

  5. Barrelcactusaddict

    Canadian Amber (Allenby Fm., 52.5-48 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    3.0g of amber, from the same lot in the two associated entries. This mid to late-Ypresian material comes from an old site near the abandoned mining town of Blakeburn, which site and its gangue piles are now technically owned by a coal mining company (although the existing legal claim of the individual who collected this amber is being overruled by the company). The amber is found primarily in association with Metasequoia sp. remains/imprints, however Pinus and Pseudolarix (among others) remains are also found in a lesser quantity at the site.

    © Kaegen Lau

  6. From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    1.2 gram amber from Tiger Mountain, King County, WA. Smaller inclusions consist mostly of slightly darker, congealed resin positioned along natural flow lines; this feature is by far most commonly seen among the Indonesian ambers. The few large, dark masses are botanical debris. Image taken under approx. 10x magnification with a Belomo Triplet loupe. This amber is middle to late Eocene in age (about 41.3-33.9 Ma), and comes from coal seams along the boundary between the upper Tukwila/lower Renton Formations.

    © Kaegen Lau

  7. From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Two exceptionally fluorescent pieces of amber from Tiger Mountain, King County, WA. These were illuminated with a 140 lumen LED penlight, not a long wave UV light; this is a surprising feature for amber of this locality, as blue amber is only well-documented to come from the Dominican Republic, Indonesia, and Chiapas. This amber is middle to late Eocene in age (about 41.3-33.9 Ma), and comes from coal seams along the boundary of the upper Tukwila/lower Renton Formations.

    © Kaegen Lau

  8. Barrelcactusaddict

    Canadian Amber (Allenby Fm., 52.5-48 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Closeup of material from previous entry.

    © Kaegen Lau

  9. Barrelcactusaddict

    Canadian Amber (Allenby Fm., 52.5-48 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Rough amber from an old site near Coalmont, British Columbia. The original site is now closed to collecting, since a mining company somehow got a court injunction and has "jumped" the owner's legal, active long-standing claim. The claim owner has informed me that he is not able to collect larger specimens (>3g fraction), as he had been able to in the past.

    © Kaegen Lau

  10. oilshale

    Metasequoia occidentalis Chaney, 1951

    References: Verschoor, K. van R. 1974. Paleobotany of the Tertiary (early Middle Eocene) McAbee Beds, British Columbia. M.Sc. thesis, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, 128 p. Link: Richard M. Dillhoff, Estella B. Leopold, and Steven R. Manchester (2005): The McAbee flora of British Columbia and its relation to the Early–Middle Eocene Okanagan Highlands flora of the Pacific Northwest. Can. J. Earth Sci. 42: 151–166. Greenwood, D.R.; Pigg, K.B.; Basinger, J.F.; DeVore, M.L. (2016). "A review of paleobotanical studies of the Early Eocene Okanagan (Okanogan) Highlands fl
  11. I've been meaning to make this post for a while, finally getting around to it. Back in July I made a trip to John Day for my first ever fossil hunt. Before I get to our finds, of course when in the area you have to spend some time enjoying the scenery of the gorgeous painted hills also on the list was the visitor center, unfortunately I didn't get many pictures there but here are a few highlights: Continued...
  12. found some pieces from an early mid-jurassic for late early-jurassic strata in Jiulongshan to the west of Beijing City, China. Pretty common. some mentioned the term storguardia to me, though I could not find any information on-line. I found that in all conifers, only metasequoia has this type of foliage (opporsite, lanceolated leaves). is it true?
  13. Paperstraw

    Kelowna Fish Fossil

    Hi all, Found this fish fossil in some slate in Kelowna. Not sure of the rock member yet, as I'm unfamiliar with Okanagan geology (besides the White Lake member). The fossil is close to a foot long, and was found along side fossils of Metasequoia occidentalis leaves as well as an unidentified deciduous branch. I imagine this is probably a fossil of Eosalmo driftwoodensis. The fossil has preserved a somewhat squished 3d rendering of the spinal/head material that is extremely fragile. Is it valuable to maintain, and if so how?
  14. Hello Fossil Forum! I recently purchased a metasequoia cone that is from the Huff, North Dakota area and the place I purchased it from has a tag claiming that it is 85 million years old. I believed it at first, but after some research I am unsure of its age. I have a Mesozoic collection going, so I’d like to know if it is late Cretaceous in age. Thank you!
  15. Nrudolph

    Mcabee Fossils

    First time posting here, thought i'd share a plate of Metasequoia that I found at the Macabee site near Cache Creek BC a number of years ago. More to follow if there's interest.
  16. Dpaul7

    METASEQUOIA DAWN REDWOOD 1.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    METASEQUOIA DAWN REDWOOD Muddy Creek Formation, Beaver Head County, Montana Oligocene Age (5 million years ago) The Dawn Redwood (Metasequoia) is a genus that dates all the way back to the age of dinosaur it is related to the California Redwoods and was thought to be extinct until living specimens were discovered in central China in 1944. First called a “fossil tree” because it was believed extinct, the fast-growing tree is now a favorite ornamental tree. It was (and is) a deciduous conifer. Today’s Metasequoia has a full pyramidal shape, grows to 120′ high. Dimensions: 2.6 Inches Lon
  17. Dpaul7

    METASEQUOIA DAWN REDWOOD 1.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    METASEQUOIA DAWN REDWOOD Muddy Creek Formation, Beaver Head County, Montana Oligocene Age (5 million years ago) The Dawn Redwood (Metasequoia) is a genus that dates all the way back to the age of dinosaur it is related to the California Redwoods and was thought to be extinct until living specimens were discovered in central China in 1944. First called a “fossil tree” because it was believed extinct, the fast-growing tree is now a favorite ornamental tree. It was (and is) a deciduous conifer. Today’s Metasequoia has a full pyramidal shape, grows to 120′ high. Dimensions: 2.6 Inches Lon
  18. Below is an open access paper about fossils from a Canadian subarctic kimberlite maar. Wolfe, A.P., Reyes, A.V., Royer, D.L., Greenwood, D.R., Doria, G., Gagen, M.H., Siver, P.A., and Westgate, J.A., 2017, Middle Eocene CO2 and climate reconstructed from the sediment fill of a subarctic kimberlite maar: Geology, v. 45, p. 619-622, http://geology.geoscienceworld.org.libezp.lib.lsu.edu/content/45/7/619 http://geology.geoscienceworld.org.libezp.lib.lsu.edu/content/45/7 Related papers: Doria, G., Royer, D.L., Wolfe, A.P., Fox, A., W
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