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  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

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  1. Eloise

    Late Carboniferous Megaspore

    Hi everyone, I've been working on a project about fossilised megaspores found in a Namurian (Late Carboniferous) coal seam in the UK. There are very few papers and photographs of megaspores so classification is a challenge! I have a couple of my unidentified specimens here that have been extracted from the coal, and was wondering if anyone could help me out? Light microscope images are attatched. The maximum diameter of the compressed spore is 1125 µm for Species A, and 1225 µm for Species B. I believe that the depositional environment was a Late Carbonifer
  2. I_gotta_rock

    What The Fossil?

    Found this in Big Brook, NJ (Late Cretaceous Navesink Fm.). It's about 2.5 cm wide. I don't even know what phylum to put it in. My first thought was bryozoan. There is one very thorough paper on Bryozoa of the Atlantic Coastal Plain, but it has nothing to fit the bill. Looks like sponge with those big holes. Found a picture of Discopora sp. that looks very close, but that genus is not listed in PBDB anywhere in North America. Gabb thought he had something similar from NJ, but it turned out to be a sand concretion. The last picture is the underside of the specimen, which may or may not be a thi
  3. Hello, I recently visited a Permian site near Waurika Pond and collected microfossils for my students to explore back in the classroom. Is there a guide to identifying these fossils out there somewhere or is piecemeal searching here the way to go. If not, I will be making the one page guide over the summer have it to offer. Any help on something simple for my elementary aged students would be much appreciated. IMG_0064.DNG IMG_0065.DNG
  4. ThePhysicist

    Shark? dermal denticle

    From the album: Post Oak Creek

    To find denticles, you need to go to the finest grain size. This beautiful one could be shark, but I'm not certain.
  5. ThePhysicist

    Rhinobatos tooth

    From the album: Post Oak Creek

    Rhinobatos teeth are probably the smallest teeth you can hope to find here - they are about as small as grains of sand.
  6. Just a quick post. Was picking through some washed gravel I got from Post Oak Creek back in the winter when I stumbled upon this guy. I'm surprised my screens were fine enough to catch him. Taking clear pics was a bit difficult so apologies for blurriness. I'm curious about what sort of shark would have a tooth of this size. Was it just a tiny pup or were there just really small species? The hashmarks are millimeters. I might make a post about my POC micro finds once I finish going through it and identifying stuff. It's a long process, but there are plenty of fun
  7. ThePhysicist

    Whale shark tooth (2)

    From the album: Lee Creek

    Rhincodon cf. typus Pungo River Fm., Aurora, NC, USA a minute tooth from the biggest fish in the sea - the whale shark. Being filter-feeders, their teeth serve no known function and are considered vestigial.
  8. OregonFossil

    Biological or what?

    Is that a biological in the center (ribbed red object)? This is around 800X (scope = 10x object, 50" HD TV, no barlow, 1/2.5" sensor). About a 1/5 crop of a 5 mpx camera. Any Ideas?
  9. I_gotta_rock

    A Few Micros

    From the album: Delaware Fossils

    A few of the hundreds of microfossils I found in one day of lying on the sandy spoils with a pair of reading glasses Coin is about 2 cm.
  10. ThePhysicist

    Orthacanthus tooth (2)

    From the album: Permian

  11. ThePhysicist

    Orthacanthus tooth

    From the album: Permian

  12. ThePhysicist

    Helodus

    From the album: Permian

  13. ThePhysicist

    Metatherian molar

    Rowe, Timothy, et al. “The Campanian Terlingua Local Fauna, with a Summary of Other Vertebrates from the Aguja Formation, Trans-Pecos Texas.” Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, vol. 12, no. 4, [Society of Vertebrate Paleontology, Taylor & Francis, Ltd.], 1992, pp. 472–93, http://www.jstor.org/stable/4523473. DeMar also has a nice description of the differentiation between eutherian/metatherian upper molars: "The upper molars of metatherians and eutherians are triangular shaped with three major cusps or bumps on the occlusal surface of the crown. The main difference
  14. ThePhysicist

    Whale shark tooth

    From the album: Lee Creek

    Rhincodon cf. typus Pungo River Fm., Aurora, NC, USA A minute tooth from the biggest fish in the sea, the whale shark. Being filter-feeders, their teeth serve no known function and are considered vestigial.
  15. Lydia.K.Tyree

    Lance formation teeth

    These are photos of an unidentified tooth from the lance formation in Wyoming, it was put in a group of mammal teeth all approximately in the range of 2-4 mm in size. Among the teeth two of them have been identified as shark, one is a Lissodus and the other is unknown as of now. If there are any ideas as to what this tooth could be please do share.
  16. Hey Everyone, Im new here and have a project for my high school science research class in high school. I have been analyzing microfossils from the Hell Creek Formation in Southern Montana and have been determining what species my specimens are from through published papers. There are some specimens however that I have not been able to determine, and have attached below. If you wouldn't mind helping me out, it would be greatly appreciated! Ps my apologies for no scale! The first two pictures are the same, looks like a pygostyle almost. Is 1mm long by 500 microns. The third photo I ha
  17. ThePhysicist

    Chirognathus sp.

    From the album: Harding Sandstone

    Chirognathus (Conodont) Harding Sandstone, Canyon City, CO, USA The "golden conodonts" from the Harding Sandstone. Conodont elements may have functioned as teeth similar to ours (though evolving independently of what would later become teeth in other vertebrates), or may have functioned as a filter apparatus.
  18. JackS

    Hell Creek Microfossil ID

    Hey all. I was wondering if anyone knew what this could be. Size is 2.7 mm by 1.1 mm. I was thinking some sort of bird based on the shape and the gradient. No clue on the specie though. The specimen is from the Hell Creek Formation in Northern Wyoming. Thanks!
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