Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'microfossils'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • blogs_blog_99
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Books I have enjoyed
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101
  • Trip Reports
  • Glendive Montana dinosaur bone Hell’s Creek
  • Ladonia Texas Fossil Park

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

  1. ThePhysicist

    Cretodus posterior

    From the album: Post Oak Creek

    Extreme posterior from a large genus. Note the striations at the foot of the crown, and no nutrient groove.
  2. I grew up in Austin, going to Shoal Creek and Barton Creek and my local backyard creek, picking up the odd fossil or rock and stashing it away. It has only been recently (within the last 8 years) that I really got interested in Paleontology and finding out about the formations and proper fossil names etc....so it's been fun to revisit a lot of the places I went as a kid and see them in a whole new light. When the Paleontological Society of Austin used to hold meetings in person, I'd go up to Austin early and go fossil hunting in Shoal Creek - it has easy access and is a hop skip and a jump fr
  3. IsaacTheFossilMan

    Micro/macro, how big do we go?

    So, I'm a bit conflicted. Part of me wants to call my specimen microfossils, yet another calls them macrofossils. Some definitions state the boundary as "being able to see the fossil with the naked eye", other state it as "being able to see the details of the fossil with the naked eye", and yet others state it as "being able to see the fossil with the naked eye or low-powered microscopes". On this forum the prefix "micro" is thrown - for want of a better word - around a lot, even when it disobeys official definitions (which are still incredibly ambiguous!). What do you
  4. ThePhysicist

    cf. Dimetrodon grandis

    From the album: Permian

    Now how can this crumb of a tooth be attributed to Dimetrodon?? First, it's serrated. It could be shark? The enamel is not smooth (not very visible in this image, a little at the bottom), so no (additionally, the serration shape is different from those of Orthacanth sharks). That narrows it down to serrated Synapsids. It turns out that very few animals at this time and location had "true" serrations, not just enamel serrations, but bumps in the dentine beneath the enamel. The enamel on this piece happens to still be clear, allowing one to see the globular dentine underneath! From B
  5. ThePhysicist

    Labyrinthodont tooth structure

    From the album: Permian

    A "lucky break" in a Labyrinthodont tooth (likely Temnospondyl amphibian) still embedded in matrix reveals the intricate labyrinth of plicidentine.
  6. ThePhysicist

    Shark teeth

    From the album: Devonian

    Most teeth are fragmentary, with the Phoebodus-type teeth being the most common.
  7. ThePhysicist

    cf. Phoebodus sp.

    From the album: Devonian

    One of the most complete teeth of this kind I've found so far (intact root, just missing two of the cusps). It's remarkably similar to Orhacanth shark teeth from the Permian, being tri-cuspid with the little "button."
  8. ThePhysicist

    Shark spine

    From the album: Devonian

    Yes, sharks used to have spines! Xenacanth sharks in the Permian and Hybodont sharks did as well. This is the only shark spine I've seen from the Devonian - if you've got one, would love to see it.
  9. ThePhysicist

    Hatchling Dimetrodon Claw?

    Hi y'all. Found this in some Permian micromatrix from Waurika, OK. There's no way I'm this lucky, but is this a very tiny Dimetrodon claw? I've tried to get access to this paper, but still waiting to see if the authors will send the text. I'm fairly confident it's at least sphenacodontid, based on pictures I've seen on the forum. It's about 3 mm in length. @dinodigger@jdp
  10. ThePhysicist

    Developing Orthacanth shark tooth?

    From the album: Permian

    This may be a pathology, or a tooth in development?
  11. ThePhysicist

    Permian microfossils

    From the album: Permian

    These are virtually all the microfossils I found in two small bags of medium-grain matrix from Waurika, OK. The matrix was very fossil rich. The vast majority of the fossils are Xenacanth/Orthacanth shark teeth. Fish material is next most common, then amphibian, and lastly, identifiable reptile material is very rare.
  12. ThePhysicist

    Labyrinthodont tooth cross section

    From the album: Permian

    A serendipitous natural break in a labyrinthodont tooth nicely displays the enamel in-foldings which give this class of amphibians their name. ^https://aaronrhleblanc.wordpress.com/2019/04/23/dental-origami-the-elegant-shapes-of-folded-dentine/
  13. ThePhysicist

    Bull Canyon Microfossils

    I got many bags of micromatrix to sift through over the Summer, one of them being from the Bull Canyon Formation, which is Late Triassic in age (~227-208.5 Ma). As has been said many times before, not much is known about the teeth that can be found here, unfortunately. The vast majority of fossils that I've found so far are fish scales, lots of fish scales. I've found a few teeth, serrated and non-serrated (mostly partial), a couple of tooth plates/jaw fragments, and random chunks of bone. The matrix is about medium grain size. For scale, the sorting dish I'm using ha
  14. One Billion-Year-Old Fossil Could Be The Oldest Multicellular Animal. David Bressan, Forbes, April 30, 2021 https://www.forbes.com/sites/davidbressan/2021/04/30/one-billion-year-old-fossil-could-be-the-oldest-multicellular-animal/ The open access paper is: Strother, P.K., Brasier, M.D., Wacey, D., Timpe, L., Saunders, M. and Wellman, C.H., 2021. A possible billion-year-old holozoan with differentiated multicellularity. Current Biology. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0960982221004243 https://www.cell.com/current-b
  15. aek

    Missouri ordovician

    Yesterday I went to get my covid vaccine 4 hours from home near some fossil localities in Missouri that I have long wanted to explore. Unfortunately, pouring rain all day thwarted my plans, but I picked up a few things of interest. Anyway, I'm curious what this is. It almost looks like Styrofoam at first glance. Are these ooids or something else?
  16. Hello, everyone, these fossils were collected from the basal Cambrian in South China, all of which are organic. But I do not know what are they? Does anyone can identify them. Please see the attachments! Many thanks.
  17. Hello TFF, I have been interested in micropalaeontology for a bit, especially after @Shamalama sent me some wonderful micro matrix samples along with slides for micropalaeontology. The tiny organisms like ostracods, conodonts, bryozoans and crinoids are so amazing and getting to see them under the microscope is very special. However, I have been limited in my ability to collect these fossils due to a lack of these slides, I got two from Dave which were beautiful and very helpful but similar ones online cost quite a bit, especially since most were from outside the US. For a while
  18. So I make slides of microfossils from ~ <1mm - 2mm. I use a glue that I make with food grade gum tragacanth and water as was recommended to me when I first started. However, I have always found it a bit annoying to make, get the consistency right and keep properly, especially as I haven't been able to find any definitive guides to this. I'm wondering whether any of you use gum tragacanth as well and have a ratio/recipe/advice for me? Or if anyone has had good success (long lasting, dries clear, secure, fossil safe) with any other type of glue? Thanks!
  19. I did my first microfossil sifting on the sandbars of the Kaw river in Kansas (I posted the trip on the forum ). Anywho, I found this microfossil that reminds me of modern day cowrie in pattern but I'm guessing its a coral? The second I am pretty sure is coral, the third is a worn crinoid segment? and the fourth, ummm I don't have a clue- one side has three parallel ridges- thoughts? Appreciate all the help as always! Bone
  20. I'm offering for trade about half a gallon of microfossil matrix collected from Post Oak Creek, Sherman, TX. It's rich in marine fossils from the Late Cretaceous Interior Seaway (Eagle Ford Group ~ 90 Ma). I cannot guarantee what you will find. I however can comment on what you can find based on my experience with this site. Sawfish oral teeth are very common. You may also find a variety of sharks' teeth, with about 8 genera that I've found so far in similar matrix (Squalicorax, Cretoxyrhina, Cretodus, Cretolamna, Ptychodus, Scapanorhynchus, Hybodus, Cantioscyllium, ...). Reptile teeth are unc
  21. Waited awhile to post this as I was waiting for my Christmas present to organize my findings. Trip was on 11-28-2020. Took my family of 5 plus a friend of my daughters. It was cold and raining the entire time we were there but everyone had a blast. Bought some cheap ponchos, didn’t work. Discovered that once the clay got wet and sticky it made no difference in what we were wearing. The kids ended up taking their shoes off and going barefoot. It was a mess but a lot of fun. Didn’t think microfossils would interest me but they did. Will plan another trip to see what the site looks like dry. Here
  22. ThePhysicist

    Dinosaur Bone

    From the album: Aguja Formation

    Dinosaurs have a distinct bone structure, with large and well-defined Haversian Systems/Osteons (which look like rings around holes where blood vessels used to be).
×
×
  • Create New...