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  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

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  1. ThePhysicist

    Edaphosaurus tooth (2)

    From the album: Permian

    Edaphosaurus sp. Wellington Fm., Waurika, OK, USA I finally identified this tooth with good confidence. It's spatulate with rounded ridges on one side, closely matching teeth in d, f in this figure (similar size as well). (From "Edaphosauridae (Synapsida, Eupelycosauria) from Europe and their relationship to North American representatives") Reptilians are a rare component of the Wellington/Ryan fauna, and I haven't seen too many Edaphosaurus teeth (several neural spines); granted, it was hard to identify. Art by Charles R. Knight (Edaphosau
  2. ThePhysicist

    Edaphosaurus tooth (1)

    From the album: Permian

    Edaphosaurus sp. Wellington Fm., Waurika, OK, USA I finally identified this tooth with good confidence. It's spatulate with rounded ridges on one side, closely matching teeth in d, f in this figure (similar size as well). (From "Edaphosauridae (Synapsida, Eupelycosauria) from Europe and their relationship to North American representatives") Reptilians are a rare component of the Wellington/Ryan fauna, and I haven't seen too many Edaphosaurus teeth (several neural spines); granted, it was hard to identify. Art by Charles R. Knight (Edaphosau
  3. I convinced my friend in England to send me some matrix from the Oxford Clay site I have the pleasure of hunting a few years ago. I really wanted to see what I could find in the micro stuff! He packed up a "Fosters sized package of Pay Dirt" as he referred to it and I got it in the mail a couple of weeks ago. It didn't take me long to go through it because I just couldn't stop! So many beautiful tiny fossils!! Star Crinoids, Belemnites, Ammonites, all of those I expected to find. What I was surprised to find was lots of tiny crab claws, couple of shark teeth and some possible Starfish ossicles
  4. ThePhysicist

    Archeria

    From the album: Permian

    Holmes (1989): "The skull and axial skeleton of the Lower Permian anthracosauroid amphibian Archeria crassidisca Cope" Art by Dmitry Bogdanov
  5. Hey everybody! I wanted to make a thread sharing with you some of the smaller fossils in my collection, many of which I've photographed using my digital microscope. Some of these I've found in the field at microsites or channel deposits, while others I've found at home searching through matrix. I hope you enjoy! Our journey begins in Wyoming's Lance formation: A Pectinodon tooth my dad found in 2017. A tooth that was identified by other forum members as potentially Avisaurus, also found in 2017. A tooth I initially called Paronychodon, although the small &
  6. So I'm working toward a new goal of local petrified wood ID. I started working toward that goal a few months back but my viewing scope just didn't have the power (or working distance I might need). The good thing is I can use this new one for searching micro fossil matrix as well. I still have my B&L for prep but it doesn't have the power or capability of my new scope either. My new scope is an AmScope SM-4TZZ-144A-18M3. If I'm allowed I'll post a link but if not you can look it up. It does 3.5X-180X comes with a 18mp camera and a .5 and 2.0 barlow. The ocular are
  7. ThePhysicist

    Juvenile Tyrannosaur

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    Tyrannosauridae (Cf. Tyrannosaurus rex) Hell Creek Fm., Wibaux Co., MT, USA This minute tooth is indeed Tyrannosaur: the mc/dc serration densities are virtually identical, and the denticle shape is not like those of Dromaeosaurids. It also has a slight pathology near the tip.
  8. Oxytropidoceras

    Pseudofossils on Mars

    Could things that look like fossils trick us thinking there was once life on Mars? If you want to believe, fake Martian fossils might convince you (but they're just rock formations). By Elizabeth Rayne, SYFY, November 30, 20221 McMahon, S. and Cosmidis, J., 2021. False biosignatures on Mars: anticipating ambiguity. Journal of the Geological Society. An Entomologist Claims That Mars Is Covered in Bug-Shaped Things, And He Has 'Proof' Yours, Paul H.
  9. I found a brittle tile of a very pleasant yellow color in a forest stream (quaternary moraine deposits containing carboniferous rocks). On closer inspection, I found a lot of small and very small inclusions. The diameter of the largest inclusions (the segment of the Crinoidea in the center of the image) is 2.5 mm. The photos were taken through a Nikon 40mm f/2.8G macro lens, including using a Close up +10 magnifying lens. To give additional contrast and enhance the effect, I used a special ZB2 filter (UV/IR-Pass) with a maximum transmission at a length of 380 nm – all images through
  10. Hey all! Today I bring you some teeny tiny gastropods! All Inferior Oolite Group, Cotswolds UK. Every formation. There are a few different species that I have described here: Species A: "helter-skelter". A very very loose spiral, resembling a helter skelter... Species B: very neat loose spiraled. Species C: very tight spiral, very common Species D: fascinatingly bumpy textured spiral. Reminds me of a wallpaper! Measurements in cm. Isaac
  11. Kasia

    Fossils from Pilatus mountain

    Dear TFF members, I have just returned from the trip to Austria and Swizterland and I need help in identifying the ones I found on the top of Pilatus mountain. From what I've read, Pilatus is made of Cretaceous rocks. To me they look like some sort of microfossils - I'm afraid I cannot take any more detailed photos with my camera, but I hope someone here will be able to make out what it is anyway
  12. ThePhysicist

    Mesodma P4

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    Mesodma sp. Hell Creek Fm., Garfield Co., MT, USA P4 (4th upper premolar) Mesodma was a genus of multituberculate mammal that lived in the same environment as many well-known dinosaurs. It must've been a hardy animal, given the genus survived the K-Pg extinction event.
  13. ThePhysicist

    Juvenile T. rex posterior

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    Tyrannosaurus rex Hell Creek Fm., Carter Co., MT, USA More information Art by RJ Palmer
  14. Here is my collection of small/micro fossils from the Arkona formation in Southern Ontario. Everything here was collected by soaking clay from the Arkona fm and sifting out the solid matrix. I'm sure many of my IDs are way off so please correct me and fill in the unknowns if you recognize anything! Tentaculites Bactrites sp. Left: Tornoceras sp. Right: Maclurites? sp. Left: Holopea? sp. Right: Nanticonema lineata Left: Hormotoma? sp. Right: Platyceras sp. Left: Scaphopods R
  15. ThePhysicist

    Theropod tooth fragment

    From the album: Aguja Formation

    Finally, a theropod! It's just a fragment, however.
  16. almach

    Microphotography

    Taken with my new microscope camera. The first three pictures will be of crocodile teeth from the Hell Creek formation of Montana and are from the Cretaceous period. All are taken at 20x to show a lot of detail. First photo: Borealosuchus Sternbergi is 4.5 mm long. Second photo: Champosaurus sp. is 3 mm long. Third photo: Brachychampsa montana
  17. ThePhysicist

    Cretodus posterior

    From the album: Post Oak Creek

    Extreme posterior from a large genus. Note the striations at the foot of the crown, and no nutrient groove.
  18. I grew up in Austin, going to Shoal Creek and Barton Creek and my local backyard creek, picking up the odd fossil or rock and stashing it away. It has only been recently (within the last 8 years) that I really got interested in Paleontology and finding out about the formations and proper fossil names etc....so it's been fun to revisit a lot of the places I went as a kid and see them in a whole new light. When the Paleontological Society of Austin used to hold meetings in person, I'd go up to Austin early and go fossil hunting in Shoal Creek - it has easy access and is a hop skip and a jump fr
  19. IsaacTheFossilMan

    Micro/macro, how big do we go?

    So, I'm a bit conflicted. Part of me wants to call my specimen microfossils, yet another calls them macrofossils. Some definitions state the boundary as "being able to see the fossil with the naked eye", other state it as "being able to see the details of the fossil with the naked eye", and yet others state it as "being able to see the fossil with the naked eye or low-powered microscopes". On this forum the prefix "micro" is thrown - for want of a better word - around a lot, even when it disobeys official definitions (which are still incredibly ambiguous!). What do you
  20. ThePhysicist

    cf. Dimetrodon grandis

    From the album: Permian

    Now how can this crumb of a tooth be attributed to Dimetrodon?? First, it's serrated. It could be shark? The enamel is not smooth (not very visible in this image, a little at the bottom), so no (additionally, the serration shape is different from those of Orthacanth sharks). That narrows it down to serrated Synapsids. It turns out that very few animals at this time and location had "true" serrations, not just enamel serrations, but bumps in the dentine beneath the enamel. The enamel on this piece happens to still be clear, allowing one to see the globular dentine underneath! From B
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