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  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

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  1. ThePhysicist

    Actinopterygian fish teeth

    From the album: Permian

    Actinopterygian (ray-finned) fish teeth from the Early Permian of OK (Wellington Fm.).
  2. ThePhysicist

    Amphibian tooth

    From the album: Permian

    An amphibian tooth from the Early Permian of OK (Wellington Fm.). They can be differentiated from similar Actinopterygian teeth by the lack of a conical acrodin cap (translucent tip), no "S" curvature, and basal creases which terminate well before the apex. The exact ID is uncertain, but it could be something like Trimerorhachis.
  3. ThePhysicist

    Lungfish scales

    From the album: Permian

    Rhipidistian (lungfish) scales from the Early Permian (Wellington Fm., Waurika, OK). They can be identified by a "honey comb" structure on one side, the other is largely featureless.
  4. ThePhysicist

    Arroyo formation sandstone

    From the album: Permian

    These sand grains were deposited by a river in the Early Permian of what would be North Texas. Iron oxides (e.g. hematite) color these sediments red (they weren't originally).
  5. ThePhysicist

    Arroyo formation sedimentology

    From the album: Permian

    Sandstone collected from the Arroyo formation (Clear Form Group) of North Texas. The color transition represents a transition between a river deposit (red) and a floodplain deposit (white). See "Geologic Guide of Baylor County, Texas"
  6. ThePhysicist

    Fish scales

    From the album: Permian

  7. ThePhysicist

    Pectinodon tooth

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    Pectinodon (meaning "comb-tooth") is a tooth taxon, since no remains attributable to the genus beyond teeth have been found. Pectinodon seems to be a rare member of the Hell Creek fauna, with their teeth being fairly uncommon (though being so small, I'd guess that few people actively search for them). It was a small Troodontid theropod, with teeth that couldn't handle stresses as well as their Dromaeosaurid and Tyrannosaurid cousins (Torices et al. (2018)). This coupled with their small size suggest that Pectinodon was a small/soft prey specialist, preferring the rodent-sized mammals of the ti
  8. ThePhysicist

    Revueltosaurus teeth

    From the album: Triassic

    Revueltosaurus was a Pseudosuchian, on the branch of the Archosaurs more closely related to the Crocodilians than the Dinosaurs. Despite the serrated teeth, it is thought to have been herbivorous.
  9. ThePhysicist

    Lungfish tooth plate

    From the album: Triassic

    Lungfish are an ancient group of fish, with swim bladders that evolution co-opted as a kind of "lung," allowing them to breathe air. This may have proven invaluable in a seasonally dry climate in Pangea.
  10. ThePhysicist

    Coelophysoid? Theropod tooth

    From the album: Triassic

    From the "dawn" of the Dinosaurs, this small tooth represents an early theropod. Unlike the other serrated archosauriform teeth present in the formation, this tooth is ziphodont - thin and labio-lingually compresed - the archetypical tooth form that most theropods adhered to since their beginnings.
  11. ThePhysicist

    Pectinodon tooth

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    Pectinodon (meaning "comb-tooth") is a tooth taxon, since no remains attributable to the genus beyond teeth have been found. Pectinodon seems to be a rare member of the Hell Creek fauna, with their teeth being fairly uncommon (though being so small, I'd guess that few people actively search for them). It was a small Troodontid theropod, with teeth that couldn't handle stresses as well as their Dromaeosaurid and Tyrannosaurid cousins (Torices et al. (2018)). This coupled with their small size suggest that Pectinodon was a small/soft prey specialist, preferring the rodent-sized mammals of the ti
  12. Hi there, I found this rock at Saltburn Beach (on the North Yorkshire Coast, UK) and it appears to be made up of some tiny round fossils approximately 3mm in diameter. Some have clear ridges running from the centre out and all appear to have a hole in the middle. There is a patch where they are together and form a longer cylinder, so maybe these are shell parts of a larger organism? I would love to know if anyone has any more information! - Eloise
  13. Hello, Some friends and I went to Chippokes State Park in Virginia last week. The park is beautiful, and going down to the beach was very nice. We ended up settling at a sand bar formed at the mouth of the College Run creek. Although, we did not find anything too remarkable at first sight - other than lots of fossil oyster and clam shells - after sitting down for a bit we found our first shark tooth. With renewed hopes we kept scouring the area and found a couple more smaller ones - no meg big or small sadly... I did decide to bring with me a gallon Ziploc bag half full of material
  14. Location: Missouri Period: Pennsylvanian Formation: Iola Limestone (Muncie Creek Shale Member) Hello once again! Today I have a fossil tooth that I happened to have seen while going through my old phosphatic nodules from Muncie Creek and was wondering if anyone could identify it further than a Cladodont tooth. I have googled images of Cladodont teeth and believe it to possible be a tooth belonging to Falcatidae, but what do you think? It resembles a few of these teeth on the chart below in size and form, hence why i'm mak
  15. aek

    Seems fishy

    Any idea what this tiny fragment could be? Found in a sample containing conodonts and other microfossils.
  16. ThePhysicist

    Restesia

    From the album: Aguja Formation

    Small, freshwater shark teeth.
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