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Found 193 results

  1. I have very stubborn matrices from Kiowa Formation that I am trying to break down to look for micro-fossils and fossil teeth. I have tried vinegar baths and ultrasonic cleaner to break it down quicker but it's not helping much. Anyway, I am trying the freezing and thawing cycles this time to further break it down. For the last few days, I had it soaked in water for about 24 hours and then I put it into the freezer bag to freeze it, and then thawed it out after overnight. Before freezing, should I add extra water into the bag or are the matrices being damp good enough? Are there more efficient ways to use the freezing and thawing cycle method? Thank you.
  2. Coin "Jar" Source

    I'm in need of some of those small round coin "jars" that have the foam inserts. I don't have a lot of micros to display but I want to buy these in some reasonable quantity such as 50 to 100. I may not be searching with the proper name because I am having a hard time finding them online. Would someone share with me their source(s)? Thanks in advance, ER
  3. I try to identify any fossils on my own before I post it on here, that's how I learn! Anyway, I found these three shark teeth while pre-washing the matrices from Kiowa Formation (Location: Ellsworth county, Kansas. Age: Albian). A couple of them came loose during pre-washing and I found another one still in the matrix. Tooth #1: Is this tooth from Meristodonoides sp.? The views are from front and back of this tooth. Approximately 2mm long. Tooth #2: Is this also from Meristodonoides sp.? Approximately 3mm long. Tooth #3: Is this from Leptostyrax sp.? Front and back views of this tooth. Approximately 6mm long.
  4. Dorset fossil hunting trip

    So recently I took a trip to the Jurassic coast in the nearby county of Dorset and I decided to share it with you and record it which I haven’t done before. The location I chose was Bathonian, Jurassic and was the Forest Marble formation. I’m sorry if my fossils seem a bit crude because I haven’t cleaned all the rock off them yet. Most of the fossils in this location are found by either processing the rock or looking on the big limestone boulders which are crammed full of brachiopods and bivalves. As I said, there are plenty of shells but the eventual vertebrate remains do turn up. Particularly sharks, fish, reptiles, amphibians and I know that this location is famous for its mammal remains. Here is a picture looking towards Eype and Thorncombe Beacon and I think that’s Seatown, Charmouth and Lyme in the distance .
  5. Help request! I am putting together a tool for judging rock age based on very crude, whole-rock, hand-sample observations of fossil faunas/floras -- the types of observations a child or beginner could successfully make. I view this as a complement to the very fine, species-level identifications commonly employed as index fossils for individual stages, biozones, etc. Attached is what I've got so far, but I can clearly use help with corals, mollusks, plants, vertebrates, ichnofossils, and the post-Paleozoic In the attached file, vibrant orange indicates times in earth history to commonly observe the item of interest; paler orange indicates times in earth history to less commonly observe the item of interest. White indicates very little to no practical probability of observing the item of interest. Please keep in mind that the listed indicators are things like “conspicuous horn corals,” purposefully declining to address rare encounters with groups of low preservation potential, low recognizability, etc. Got additions/amendments, especially for the groups mentioned above? Toss them in the comments below! Thank you..... https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1tVm_u6v573V4NACrdebb_1OsBEAz60dS1m4pCTckgyA
  6. 715-Million-Year-Old Fungi Microfossils Found

    http://www.sci-news.com/paleontology/neoproterozoic-fungi-microfossils-08049.html
  7. Scientists use ancient marine fossils to unravel longstanding climate puzzle by Cardiff University https://phys.org/news/2020-01-scientists-ancient-marine-fossils-unravel.html Ancient marine fossils reveal how rising sea levels trapped carbon in the oceans preventing extinction-level global warming 14 million years ago. Fossil records suggest high levels of carbon was captured in ocean sediment. Significant volcanic activity had previously led to extinction level events. RyanMorrison, Daily Mail, January 9, 2020 https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-7869605/Ancient-marine-fossils-used-study-previous-global-warming-events.html The Open Access paper is: Sosdian, S., Babila, T.L., Greenop, R., Foster, G.L. and Lear, C., 2019. Ocean Carbon Storage across the middle Miocene: A new interpretation for the Monterey Event. Nature Communications. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-019-13792-0 Yours, Paul H.
  8. Devonian micromatrix

    Hello everyone, Recently @Shamalama showed me great kindness and generosity when he sent me some samples of matrix from three Devonian sites. This package arrived yesterday and I have slowly been picking out all of the tiny fossils. I want to use this topic to show off my finds. Here is everything I received:
  9. Shumilova, T.G., Ulyashev, V.V., Kazakov, V.A., Isaenko, S.I., Svetov,S.A., Chazhengina, S.Y., Kovalchuk, N.S., Karite – diamond fossil: a new type of natural diamond,Geoscience Frontiers, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gsf.2019.09.011. (open access) https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1674987119301768 Yours, Paul H.
  10. Micro shark teeth

    From the album Post Oak Creek

    Micro shark teeth fossils found in micromatrix collected 9/28/19. Clockwise: The upmost orange one is nurse shark (Cantioscyllium sp.) with intact root, goblin (Scapanorynchus sp.), crow (Squalicorax sp.), Hybodus sp., and either Cretodus sp. or goblin.
  11. Post oak creek mystery micro tooth

    Hey y'all. I haven't seen anyone post about POC microfossils, so last time I was there I filled a sandwich bag full of gravel. I looked through it yesterday and found a bunch of neat stuff: sawfish oral teeth (see gallery), tiny sharks' teeth, vertebrae, fish teeth, mastodon ivory (?), bone, etc. There's this one tooth that I can't i.d. I'm not sure if it's sawfish, I don't think it's a shark. Thank you!
  12. Ptychotrygon sp. (sawfish) oral teeth

    From the album Post Oak Creek

    Tiny oral teeth from extinct sawfish. I haven't seen many posts about POC microfossils, so I decided to see what's there. I filled a sandwich baggie with gravel last time I was there and found these and a ton of other neat stuff. Scale bar ~ 1 mm.
  13. Echinoids

    The first 8 are echinoids and echinoid spines, I have seen plenty of photos of them while researching forams. Doctor Mud.....I can not confirm it but I do think you may be right about the last two being some sort of echinoid, This thing is only about a half a millimeter in size, I can't find anything online that looks like it but will keep at it.
  14. Hi, a few days ago I went on my first ever fossil hunting trip to Eben-Emael, a Limestone quarry in Belgium that dates to the Maastrichtian and is part from the type location (the historical ENCI quarry being only a 3,5 km to the north. The trip was orginized by the BVP (Belgische Vereniging voor Paleontologie) and a short report of the trip with phot's and some of the finds can be found in this topic by @Manticocerasman who I was lucky enough to tag along with, cause I doubt I would have found many mention worthy fossils without the guidance of Kevin. But since I am into microfossils I decided to collect some samples of the limestone without the obvious fossils home to later be able to look for microfossils as it should be quite rich. I think I have around 1 - 3 kg of matrix left to look for microfossils. But I have never myself dissolved matrix, and although it seems easy, I don't want to make any mistakes. During the trip they advised me on two different approaches, depending on what kind of fossils I wanted to find. One approach was dissolving in water and the other in vinegar, but now the seeming obvious question. How exactly do I do that? Should I just take a bucket of a glass, fill it halfway with said liquids and just wait? Or should I use a sieve and lay the block there so only fossils remain in the sieve and the rest goes to the buttom. Does the limestone just dissolve or does some kind of putty residu where the microfossils will be in? If so, how to properly remove the fossils when you pour out the liquids without pouring out the fossils? I know I have many questions and some might be very obvious and straigh-forward, but I really haven't done this before and I would like to do it the right way from start. So thanks in advance for any tips & tricks, I would really appreciate any help!
  15. These things are very small and difficult to find but I came across a stone that was littered with hundreds of forams and these spicules. I don't recall seeing anything that look like a sponge so I'm very curious as to why there were so many of these spicules being found in this stone that was found in a desert.
  16. Hoping some of the pros here are willing to share microfossil prep techniques or suggestions to journal articles on the subject. I have been hunting conodonts and the like for quite some time, but the glacial acetic acid digestion and pan and scan techniques have failed me. I experimented with HCl and H2SO4 in various concentrations, and even tried some ion exchange extractions ( which work on paper, but are lousy in practice)! This sort of fossil hunting has become vendetta for me and I suspect I am using the wrong search terms in the academic data bases. I'll be on an excursion until the 26th of July, but I'm going to try and check in here from Spanish Fork or Delta. (And hopefully have some non-nebraska samples to work with and turn my students loose on!)
  17. Another day hunting in Wyoming's Lance formation proved more successful than yesterday. Due to the high amount of rain Wyoming has been facing this year, many would be exposures were grassed in. We started at a channel deposit which was producing a number of bone pieces. Although bones were relatively plentiful, there were no spectacular finds with the best being a thescelosaurus vertebra found by another member of the group. My best find from this hillside was a section of Triceratops jaw, a partial crown found in the conglomerate where the fossils were eroding from. and some variety of small animal limb bone (reptile or mammal). Here are some pics from this site A hadrosaur spit tooth A piece of softshell turtle shell A bivalve The Triceratops crown After most of the people had left the site, I explored the surrounding area and found an anthill which proved to be very bountiful in the microfossils it produced. I found several small crocodilian teeth, a tiny myledaphus tooth, a gar tooth and a potential mammal tooth.
  18. Yesterday I was picking through an incredible recent sample from Dogs Bay, Ireland which contains an abundance of foraminifera, ostracods, spicules, gastropods and echinoid spines and have been wondering about how I am going to arrange them on my slides. I am relatively new to microfossils and use microfossil slides with 32 grids. In this instance, is it more common protocol to create separate slides for each type of microfossil (e.g, slide 1: forams, slide 2: ostracods etc.), or to just create a mixed slide that may be more representative and also more interesting to look at but which also makes it harder to logically organise? How do you organise your microfossils on your slides? I hope my question made sense, thanks!
  19. Filming Conodonts

    Hi! I recently acquired a bunch of microfossil samples for kids to play but did not expect them to be so small. We tried some microscopy but ended up applying a little trick that actually to helped to film them "in action", which was kind of cool. I do not know if this technique is a common knowledge or not but I decided to share. Perhaps, it will be of use to somebody. Here you go: Any suggestions for improvements? Thanks!
  20. Hi, here is a bunch of tiny beauties from Texas (Lake Bridgeport). If somebody can help ID the gastropods at 1:40 and a crinoid at 4:20, it would be much appreciated.
  21. I have some pollen grains, spores(?), and other non-pollen palynomorphs as well, which I would like to identify that I photographed from a number of slides. However, I have no eye for these things yet (if only my university offered palynology courses!) so I am in need of references to start reading and hopefully use to identify some stuff now and in the future. I know that it's a pretty specialized area, but any input could be helpful as references accessible to people who don't yet know how to identify these things seem to be few and far between. I have access to Paleopalynology by Alfred Traverse (2007) through my university. I was given Fossil Fungi by Thomas N. Taylor, Michael Krings, and Edith Taylor (2014) as a gift from a family member. It's a lovely book, and excellent reference for fungi. I have found little on pollen and other terrestrial microfossils aside from Traverse and Taylor that seems useful. Marine micro/nanofossils get a lot more attention, apparently. While I am a student with a good working knowledge, I still need stuff that's clear and not too technical, as I am mostly learning this on my own. Anyone have suggestions for other material I could make use of (both modern pollen/palynomorphs and fossils)?
  22. Hi everyone I think I just found a new hobby With my latest fossil delivery I recieved quite a lot of microfossils & matrix vials as the world of microfossils was something that I have been long interested in. So a 2 weeks ago I finally ordered my first microfossils for which I reserved a special drawer in my archive cabinet. So here is a recapp of what I all got: 3 vials of permian material from Waurika, Oklahoma 1 vial of permian material from The red beds of Archer County, Texas 1 small vial of Conodont rich Mississippian material from the Chappel Limestone formation, Texas 1 small vial of Cretaceous Lower Gault Clay, East Wear bay, Folkestone, Kent, UK A micropalaeontology slide with Jurassic Blue Lias matrix rich in holothurian material. A thin section of an Ostracods filled Elimia snail from the Green River Formation in Wyoming A thin section from the Rhynie chert of Scotland which should contain preserved parts of the plant Aglaophyton major and perhaps even other species. I also got a lot of Bull Canyon micro fossil teeth and 2 cretaceous mammal teeth from Hell Creek In this topic you will be able to follow my path through this newly discovered hobby as I will post my finds and progress Currently I am only working with a clip-on cellphone microscope, but I do plan on getting a professional microscope in the next few months! (Tips are always welcome) So let's put on our Ant-Man suit and explore the microfossil realm So here are some of the first pictures I made of some of the microfossils Starting with the thin slices! Thin slice with Ostracon filled Elimia tenara snail from the Green River Formation, Wyoming Thin slice with Aglaophyton major from Rhynie Chert in Scotland
  23. Hi! I recently aqcuired quite a lot of "microfossils" to kick off my Triassic collection, as I personally find it one of the most interesting time periods and while I am aware possibly not all of them are ID'd correctly I just wanted to get some nice fossils from this time period regardless of their ID's. All the fossils I acquired are from the Bull Canyon Formation, Dockum Group, San Miguel County, New Mexico, USA (Norian age) But I myself am not very knowledgeable yet in this material as I just started my collection but I am aware that some if not most of the ID's on these fossils given by the seller might be wrong as everything I read about the Bull Canyon formation says that the formation isn't that well discribed yet. I tried to make the photo's as good as I could, but it wasn't always easy given their extremely small size, so I hope the quality is good enough to work with. So I am kinda hoping is someone here on the forum would like to give it a try to see if he/she could confirm or disprove given ID's. Thank you in advance! The first set of 2 teeth were listed as the Phytosaur "Pseudopalatus" teeth which after doing a bit of research is considered a junior synonym for "Machaeroprosopus" The next collection of 3 teeth were listed as the Pseudosuchian "Revueltosaurus" The next tooth was listed as a "Theropod indet" tooth, and I know there are at least 2 species of theropod present at Bull Canyon, a Coelophysid called Gojirasaurus and a herrerasaurid called Chindesaurus. But I am not even sure whether this tooth is dinosaurian or not. The next set of teeth were listed as "Arganodus" lungfish teeth And the final tooth was listed as a "Sphenodont" (Rhynchocephalia indet.) tooth with affinities to Clevosaurus (which is found in Nova Scotia, Great Britain and China)
  24. Hi! I recently acquired a few new additions to my permian collection, but there are a few pieces of which I am not a 100 % whether they are ID'd correctly, simply because I am not yet knowlegdeable about the material. So I thought it might be a good idea to post the ones I am doubtfull about here, as I know there are a lot of people more knowlegdeable than me who probably could ID them. The first item is a small claw listed as "juvenile dimetrodon limbatus" from the Red Beds, Archer County, Texas, USA I was a bit doubtfull when they said "juvenile" dimetrodon claw, but I got it anyway because it's a very nice permian claw which was an okay price regardless the ID. The second item is a caudal vertebra that was listed as "Edaphosaurus" (from the Archer City Formation, Red Beds, Archer County, Texas, USA) which came as a set along with a piece of sail spine which without doubt belongs to Edaphosaurus. The last items were sold as a collection of "Eryops megacephalus" fossils from the Wellington garbar complex, Waurika, Okhlahoma. From left to right are a piece of skull plate, a toe bone, a piece of dermal armor and a tooth.
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