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  1. Another new Strophodus-related paper is out, if anyone's aware: Sharma, A., and Singh, S., 2021. A small assemblage of marine hybodont sharks from the Bathonian of the Jaisalmer Basin, India. Neues Jahrbuch für Geologie und Paläontologie - Abhandlungen 301 (3): 317–333. doi:10.1127/njgpa/2021/1014. This year's publication of a paper describing a new Asteracanthus specimen showed that the synonymy of Strophodus with Asteracanthus was incorrect and arbitrary, and it's a coincidence that Strophodus indicus is of the same age (Bathonian) as the Strophodus type species, S. i
  2. There are additional unidentified conchostraca (clam shrimps, arthropods) on the slab. The age of the Daohugou strata has been notoriously difficult to determine, and a number of studies have produced conflicting results. Gao and Shubin reported an Argon-argon dating age of 164 ±4 million years ago (Middle to Late Jurassic, Bathonian to Oxfordian), this opinion is now widely accepted. Taxonomy according to Wei et al., 2012. Line drawing from Wei et al., 2012. Description according to Wei et al., 2012: “Small-sized, body length about 10.4–10.6 mm (with head), width 2
  3. DD1991

    Steneosaurus revised

    A new fossil crocodylomorph-related paper is now available online: Johnson, M. M., Young, M. T., and Brusatte, S. L. (2020). Emptying the wastebasket: a historical and taxonomic revision of the Jurassic crocodylomorph Steneosaurus. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society 189 (2): 428–448. https://doi.org/10.1093%2Fzoolinnean%2Fzlaa027 Michela Johnson and colleagues restrict Steneosaurus to the type species S. rostromajor, and make the teleosauroid snout MNHN 8900 the S. rostromajor lectotype (the skull fragment MNHN 8753 was later recognized as belonging to the metrio
  4. Tidgy's Dad

    Ifrane, Morocco.

    Hi, gang. Some of you may remember the Southern Morocco trip I took in February. One of the places visited was quite near to me, about 70 km, lovely Swiss style mountain town called Ifrane where I found some Middle Jurassic brachiopods and echinoids. See http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/93193-ifrane-middle-atlas-morocco/&tab=comments#comment-1026671 A friend offered to drive me up there for the day so off we went I decided to check some outcrops on the other side of the road this time so went and had a peek.Sorry, no photos this time as wifey did
  5. Could any send me copies of two new papers describing two new sauropods from the Middle Jurassic of China: Chao Tan; Ming Xiao; Hui Dai; Xu-Feng Hu; Ning Li; Qing-Yu Ma; Zhao-Ying Wei; Hai- Yu; Can Xiong; Guang-Zhao Peng; Shan Jiang; Xin-Xin Ren; Hai-Lu You (2020). A new species of Omeisaurus (Dinosauria: Sauropoda) from the Middle Jurassic of Yunyang, Chongqing, China fauna. Historical Biology: An International Journal of Paleobiology. in press. doi:10.1080/08912963.2020.1743286. Xin-Xin Ren; Toru Sekiya; Tao Wang; Zhi-Wen Yang; Hai-Lu You (2020). A revision of the ref
  6. Attached find a paper that eescribes a new theropod, Yunyangosaurus puanensis based on a fragmentary specimen recovered from the Middle Jurassic Xintiangou Formation of Chongqing, southwestern China. It shares several features uniquely with some megalosauroids https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-56959-x
  7. Hey all, I thought I would make a thread to show some of my shark teeth that I have collected from the Oxford Clay formation (mainly the Peterborough Member), feel free to comment if I have misidentified anything! Pre-Apologies, some of them are quite small.. Cheers, Jacob.
  8. A new ornithischian-related paper is available online: Ning Li, Hui Dai, Chao Tan, Xufeng Hu, Zhaoying Wei, Yu Lin, Guangbiao Wei, Deliang Li, Li Meng, Baoqiao Hao, Hailu You & Guangzhao Peng (2019) A neornithischian dinosaur from the Middle Jurassic Xintiangou Formation of Yunyang, Chongqing, China: the earliest record in Asia, Historical Biology, DOI: 10.1080/08912963.2019.1679129 Agilisaurus, Xiaosaurus, Gongbusaurus, and Hexinlusaurus were thought to be Middle Jurassic, but are now seen as Oxfordian-aged following the paper by Wang et al. (2018). Sanxiasaurus is
  9. The Amateur Paleontologist

    Freshwater plesiosaur material from the Jurassic of China

    Hey everyone Thought I'd share with you this new paper I found on ResearchGate; it basically reports the first discovery of remains of freshwater plesiosaurs from the middle Jurassic of Gansu province (in China). Gao, T., Li, D.-Q., Li, L.-F., and Yang, J.-T. (2019). The first record of freshwater plesiosaurian from the Middle Jurassic of Gansu, NW China, with its implications to the local palaeobiogeography. Journal of Palaeogeography 8:27. Abstract: Plesiosaurs are one of the common groups of aquatic reptiles in the Mesozoic, which mainly lived in marine e
  10. Not much is published on UK theropod teeth so its nice to see this one. Although the teeth are not in the best shape its good to understand what clads are being found. This paper reports on two new isolated theropod teeth discovered on the Isle of Skye, Scotland representing at least two species. https://sjg.lyellcollection.org/content/early/2019/04/30/sjg2018-020
  11. Day One ; Locality Three. Midelt 19th February 2019 The Berber nomads are hospitable, generous and very tough : The snow disappears soon after you get onto the High Plains between the Middle and High Atlas ranges. Here are the High Atlas looming in the distance : As one approaches the town of Midelt, the layered geology of what is mostly Dogger, the old name for the Middle Jurassic, still used here, becomes clear : Midelt is full of fossil shops, however most of the fossils, including a kazillion trilobites, actually come from elsew
  12. Our Moroccan trip from 19th-23rd February 2019. Day One; Locality One IFRANE Here we are near Ifrane, a village built by the French in the 1930's in a Swiss chalet style so there are pointy roofs instead of the usual traditional flat roofs of Moroccan buildings. This is wifey and Anouar, a Moroccan tour guide, old friend and one time student of English, his brother, our driver Abdullah, is taking the photo. Anouar paid for the trip, accommodation and food in return for me teaching him a little about the fossils, crystals and minerals that we encountered. The trip w
  13. Ludwigia

    Finally got out again!

    The weather suddenly warmed up for a few days and started melting the snow, so I figured I'd grab the opportunity yesterday and check out the Geisingen area as long as the weather held. It's supposed to get colder again next week, so I thought I'd try to take advantage before more snow gets dumped on us. This was my first sojourn in over a month, so I was just glad to get out into the field, even if it didn't pan out much. I'd heard that a group had been digging with some success at the clay pit, so I thought I'd have a look-see to at least assess the situation there. It turned out that t
  14. Any help that anyone can give me would be absolutely fabulous I'm a mature student trying to write her dissertation and I'm a bit lost Although I don't think it's essential to know what the fossils I find are, I think it would be nice to have a name , but not even the mighty Google has been much help! I also have a few more samples I may post later, if its not too much trouble cheers, Nicky
  15. Dpaul7

    Ichthyosaur Paddle Bone 1.JPG

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Ichthyosaur Paddle Bone Weymouth Harbour, Dorset, United Kingdom Middle Jurassic (160 Million Years) Ichthyosaurs (Greek for "fish lizard" ) are large marine reptiles. Ichthyosaurs belong to the order known as Ichthyosauria or Ichthyopterygia ('fish flippers' – a designation introduced by Sir Richard Owen in 1840, although the term is now used more for the parent clade of the Ichthyosauria). Ichthyosaurs thrived during much of the Mesozoic era; based on fossil evidence, they first appeared around 250 million years ago (Mya) and at least one species survived until about 90 million year
  16. Dpaul7

    Ichthyosaur Paddle Bone 1.JPG

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Ichthyosaur Paddle Bone Weymouth Harbour, Dorset, United Kingdom Middle Jurassic (160 Million Years) Ichthyosaurs (Greek for "fish lizard" ) are large marine reptiles. Ichthyosaurs belong to the order known as Ichthyosauria or Ichthyopterygia ('fish flippers' – a designation introduced by Sir Richard Owen in 1840, although the term is now used more for the parent clade of the Ichthyosauria). Ichthyosaurs thrived during much of the Mesozoic era; based on fossil evidence, they first appeared around 250 million years ago (Mya) and at least one species survived until about 90 million year
  17. I still continue to find this particular type of fossil. But can't quite seem to take a description of the find beyond (probable fish element). Found from the Peterborough Member (Callovian, Middle Jurassic) of the Oxford Clay. more commonly known as the Lower Oxford Clay. Also just to say other identical finds to this one seem to have the same appearance, shape, size and colouration. And are quite sporadic when found. All suggestions welcome. Scale bar is in millimetres.
  18. I mentioned in this thread that I would be taking my camera along the next time I go on a hunt to the Wutach Valley, and believe it or not, I actually remembered , so I figured I might as well take you all along for the trip. The goal is exposures of the murchisonae and bradfordensis zones in the middle Jurassic Aalenian layers, which are accessible on some forested hills in the viscinity. Prime finds are ammonites with some bivalves with some other fauna occasionally strewn amongst them. The first thing to do is to drive your car up a dirt road and then park it on a meadow with permissio
  19. Tidgy's Dad

    SKYE DINO PRINTS

    They keep finding great things on Skye! http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-43620237
  20. Dpaul7

    Ichthyosaur Vertebra a.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Ichthyosaur Vertebra SITE LOCATION: Weymouth Harbour, Dorset, United Kingdom TIME PERIOD: Middle Jurassic (160 Million Years) Ichthyosaurs (Greek for "fish lizard" ) are large marine reptiles. Ichthyosaurs belong to the order known as Ichthyosauria or Ichthyopterygia ('fish flippers' – a designation introduced by Sir Richard Owen in 1840, although the term is now used more for the parent clade of the Ichthyosauria). Ichthyosaurs thrived during much of the Mesozoic era; based on fossil evidence, they first appeared around 250 million years ago (Mya) and at least
  21. Dpaul7

    Ichthyosaur Vertebra a.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Ichthyosaur Vertebra SITE LOCATION: Weymouth Harbour, Dorset, United Kingdom TIME PERIOD: Middle Jurassic (160 Million Years) Ichthyosaurs (Greek for "fish lizard" ) are large marine reptiles. Ichthyosaurs belong to the order known as Ichthyosauria or Ichthyopterygia ('fish flippers' – a designation introduced by Sir Richard Owen in 1840, although the term is now used more for the parent clade of the Ichthyosauria). Ichthyosaurs thrived during much of the Mesozoic era; based on fossil evidence, they first appeared around 250 million years ago (Mya) and at least
  22. Dpaul7

    Ichthyosaur Vertebra a.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Ichthyosaur Vertebra SITE LOCATION: Weymouth Harbour, Dorset, United Kingdom TIME PERIOD: Middle Jurassic (160 Million Years) Ichthyosaurs (Greek for "fish lizard" ) are large marine reptiles. Ichthyosaurs belong to the order known as Ichthyosauria or Ichthyopterygia ('fish flippers' – a designation introduced by Sir Richard Owen in 1840, although the term is now used more for the parent clade of the Ichthyosauria). Ichthyosaurs thrived during much of the Mesozoic era; based on fossil evidence, they first appeared around 250 million years ago (Mya) and at least
  23. Dpaul7

    Sea Urchin Fossil - PHYMOSOMA a.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Sea Urchin Fossil - PHYMOSOMA Morocco Middle Jurassic (about 170 Million Years Ago) Phymosoma is an extinct genus of echinoids that lived from the Cretaceous to the Eocene. Sea Urchins are a group of marine invertebrates that today can be found in almost every major marine habitat from the poles to the equator and from the intertidal zone to depths of more than 5,000 metres. There are around 800 extant species and the group has a long and detailed fossil record stretching back about 450 million years ago to the Late Ordovician Period. Commonly called "Sea Biscuits" of Sea Urchi
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