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  1. digit

    Paleoclimate of Florida

    Came across this paper (actually a chapter from a larger work) that was published back in 2017. Was doing an internet search and my keywords proffered this as a search result. This paper covers a bit about the early geology of the landmass that became the state of Florida but contains a more in depth look at the climate and geology over the last 50 Ma. It is not a very long read and contains some interesting graphics. I'd recommend this as fundamental reading for any Florida resident interesting in geology and fossil hunting. A really nice concise background into the geology of our state that
  2. While out on one of the small "islands" off the coast of Wrightsville Beach, Wilmington, North Carolina- yesterday morning I found this tooth. I have quite a few teeth and various fossils but something about this one feels different. I'm sure everyone says that but I have gone through various shark i.d. questionnaires and can't get a specific conclusion. I've had suggestions from an ancient "cow shark" type species (I think bc I answered "yes" to present cusplet) but there is clearly one and it doesn't appear another broke off- which makes me think age is a factor (as in this could've belonged
  3. Shale_stack

    Scallops. Pecten or Chesapecten ?

    Found in Calvert county Maryland. Attempting to figure out the Latin name but I keep getting different names online.
  4. Shale_stack

    Quahog clam ?

    Found in the Calvert formation of Virginia. I think it’s a Mercenaria sp. but would love some thoughts.
  5. Daltong

    Questions about a few teeth

    These are a few of the nicest/most interesting teeth I've found, and I was wondering if anyone knows about the two on the bottom left. I think the one with the red and orange tip is some sort of mako tooth or a similar species, and from what I could find the one beside it with the round profile could be one of the earliest ancestors of white sharks. The top three I believe are all from megalodons, as well as the really short yellow tooth on the bottom. I think that one is a tooth that was growing inside the jaw or something due to its small size compared to the size of the root. The smaller to
  6. MikeR

    Echinocardium marylandiense

    Collected by the Smithsonian Vertebrate Collections Manager at Scientists Cliffs on the Chesapeake Bay after a storm early 2020s.
  7. Hello everyone Thanks for looking. I found these yesterday at a Savannah River Dredge Spoil Island after fairly heavy rains and tides. Unfortunately the dredging and river action damages pretty much everything. Most of what is found is Pleistocene to Miocene. These have me stumped. The following are my guesses as to what the following 5 items are: #1 Camel or Horse Canine? Doesn't look like others that I've found or google image searches-Doesn't have a color/texture change from root to crown-Has a ridge on the back side and sharp edge at the end-Looks too symmetrical
  8. Found this in northeast Nevada on the surface during a survey. Believe to be Miocene or older. Possibly a carpal or tarsal?
  9. I recently got a small bag of fossils from the Miocene Santa Margarita Formation. These all came from the Templeton California area. There were some really interesting shark teeth ( Squalus, Squatina, Triakis, Pristiophorus) and quite a few fish teeth. This one particular tooth is a bit of a mystery. I thought it could possibly be a broken Heterodontus anterior tooth. I can’t rule out fish though. I suppose it could also be a marine mammal I’m not familiar with too. I’m a collector of Heterodontus teeth so my lean toward that could be a bit of bias. I thought I’d put it to the forum for
  10. Largemouth Bass

    Mammal (?) tooth

    Looking for a possible ID of this tooth fragment. It is almost 1 inch (2.5 cm) in length.
  11. DarasFossils

    Miocene Pea Crab Preparation

    Hello, I am new to fossil preparation but I bought one of those Miocene Crab concretions, but I am not sure how to separate the rock without damaging the crab inside. I only have dental tools and chisels, but they are not enough to separate the two sides for a pos/neg display that I could like. What sorts of tools could I use for the job? It is something similar to the picture below.
  12. In late August, I went fossil hunting in Maryland, near the Calvert Cliffs formation, and found this tooth. I am wondering what type if shark this tooth would have come from. It measures around an inch long.
  13. Shellseeker

    Playing in the mud

    When the Peace River is too deep, I sometimes try land hunting and fortunately I have very good fossil friends who make me smile when I see them AND who have the skills. My son and I got together on New Years day and had a great time sloshing in the mud and making a memory. The mud turns to concrete when it dries on equipment and boots and it took more than a few hours to get cleaned up. A couple of nice finds , one to try and ID. The 1st is a nice little Meg that I sent on to my grandson in Texas. Liked the Olive drab color in the sunshine. The 2nd is a small do
  14. Harry Pristis

    Whale Periotic Needs Identification

    This smallish odontocete periotic turned up in a box of miscellaneous phosphate mine things. This was collected decades ago from the Gardinier Mine in Polk County, Florida. I can't match it with any of the periotics in my drawer. Perhaps someone here has a match for this fossil. @Boesse
  15. Largemouth Bass

    Posterior/symphyseal meg?

    Serrations are almost completely worn but faintly visible on the left side. The right side is also a bit damaged, so correct me if this is not a meg. If it is, is it a posterior with a skinny crown or some sort of symphyseal? Length is 1.27 cm.
  16. Burke_Family

    Petrified wood ID

    Hi — this Is a beach find. (Oregon coast.) It’s small, maybe the circumference of a dime. We think it’s petrified wood? A close-up shows patterns that look like wood cells, but we’re not 100% and hoping someone here has more knowledge. Thanks!
  17. concealedcrab

    Miocene Shark (?) tooth

    Found in a conglomerate bed of the upper Vaqueros fm. has a weird shape, almost like its been digested? been curious about it for a while. Ventura County, CA
  18. concealedcrab

    Cetacean tooth fragment?

    Here we go again! found in the same conglomerate facies of the Vaqueros is this weird tooth(?). To be honest I’m not even sure its tooth, could be a small piece of bone. BUT it does have an distinct piece of enamel(?) near one of the tips. Unfortunately rarely any teeth here have been found whole. But I will keep looking! hoping you people with more experience can help solve another mystery!
  19. concealedcrab

    Softshell Turtle caparace fragment?

    Alright y’all I have another weird one for ya. Also found in the Upper Vaqueros is this awfully odd piece. (Can you tell I love Vaqueros? Haha!) First I thought it was bone, then some kind of bryozoan, then fossilized wood, but now I believe I have nailed it down to some kind of Softshell turtle. check out these photos from Cessaniti, Italy (late Miocene) of a few pieces of carapace fragment. They look awfully similar. softshell turtles are previously unreported from the vaqueros I believe
  20. First trip fossil hunting. Mix of vertibrate fossil, unidentified trace fossils, and pretty rocks (hard to tell from from the photo). Second batch is from Caparica, Miocene, including shark teeth (probably maku). Anyone want to help ID some?
  21. Shellseeker

    A tusk

    On May 12th, 2020 I found this fossil in a Florida location that predominately has produce Miocene era fauna. On the same day, I found other fossils that grabbed my attention and my postings to the forum were mostly about the other items found that day. I am posting this today for a couple of reasons: 1) I would like my own identification confirmed, 2) I would seek other similar finds from other forum members. and most important, 3) I would like a record in TFF of the photos and find , so that I can more effectively retrieve it for myself and link other members to it.
  22. Largemouth Bass

    Mystery Potomac bone

    Around 1 inch (2.5 cm) in length. It has an apparent ribbed structure on one side. From the Potomac River in VA.
  23. Barrelcactusaddict

    Borneo Amber (Upper Nyalau Fm., 20.44-15.97 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Borneo Amber Merit Block Coal Deposits Kapit Division, Sarawak State, Malaysia Upper Nyalau Formation 20.44-15.97 Ma Weight: 351.5 grams Dimensions: 123 x 86 x 45 millimeters The specimen arrived freshly cut from what was a larger, football-sized specimen; with a minor amount of shaping/sanding, I then polished it as best I could. This material is very soft, so a glassy polish similar to that of harder ambers isn't possible. Borneo amber is essentially coeval in age with Sumatra amber, or at least its Formations (upper Gumai, Air Ben

    © Kaegen Lau

  24. Barrelcactusaddict

    Borneo Amber (Upper Nyalau Fm., 20.44-15.97 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Borneo Amber Merit Block Coal Deposits Kapit Division, Sarawak State, Malaysia Upper Nyalau Formation 20.44-15.97 Ma Weight: 351.5 grams Dimensions: 123 x 86 x 45 millimeters *Fluorescence under 365nm UV light The specimen arrived freshly cut from what was a larger, football-sized specimen; with a minor amount of shaping/sanding, I then polished it as best I could. This material is very soft, so a glassy polish similar to that of harder ambers isn't possible. Borneo amber is essentially coeval in age with Sumatra amber, o

    © Kaegen Lau

  25. Barrelcactusaddict

    Borneo Amber (Upper Nyalau Fm., 20.44-15.97 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Borneo Amber Merit Block Coal Deposits Kapit Division, Sarawak State, Malaysia Upper Nyalau Formation 20.44-15.97 Ma Weight: 351.5 grams Dimensions: 123 x 86 x 45 millimeters The specimen arrived freshly cut from what was a larger, football-sized specimen; with a minor amount of shaping/sanding, I then polished it as best I could. This material is very soft, so a glassy polish similar to that of harder ambers isn't possible. Borneo amber is essentially coeval in age with Sumatra amber, or at least its Formations (upper Gumai, Air Ben

    © Kaegen Lau

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