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  1. MariaH667

    What is this fossil

    It was found in santa margarita about 2 years ago. I don't know the details of the area. It sat out and exposure sun and rain was and it was once all in one piece and not pieces like it is now. top and bottom. It was just gonna sitting there and who knows eventually trown out. If I hadn't asked for it and it was given to me.
  2. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Cosmopolitodus hastalis/Isurus hastalis tooth, Mako Shark Olcese Sandstone, Bakersfield, California Miocene Age (23.03-5.333 million years ago) Cosmopolitodus hastalis, the broad-tooth mako or giant white shark (other common names include the extinct giant mako and broad-tooth white shark), is an extinct mackerel shark that lived from the Miocene epoch to the Pliocene epoch. Its teeth can reach lengths up to 3.5 in (7.5 cm) and are found worldwide. It is believed to be an ancestor to the great white shark, a fact supported by the transitional species Carcharodon hubbelli, and most lik
  3. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Agatized Fossil Tabulate Coral (Polished) Indonesia Miocene age (approx 20 million year old) Data: This interesting natural color stone was formed from ancient coral beds in Indonesia. Over the course of a very long time - perhaps 20 Million Years - the coral skeletal remains were gradually replaced with agate, chalcedony, or microcrystalline quartz, in a cell by cell replacement process that leaves flower-like patterns from the fossil skeletons imprinted three dimensionally in the stone. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: Hexacorallia Order: Tabulata
  4. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Cosmopolitodus hastalis/Isurus hastalis tooth, Mako Shark Olcese Sandstone, Bakersfield, California Miocene Age (23.03-5.333 million years ago) Cosmopolitodus hastalis, the broad-tooth mako or giant white shark (other common names include the extinct giant mako and broad-tooth white shark), is an extinct mackerel shark that lived from the Miocene epoch to the Pliocene epoch. Its teeth can reach lengths up to 3.5 in (7.5 cm) and are found worldwide. It is believed to be an ancestor to the great white shark, a fact supported by the transitional species Carcharodon hubbelli, and most lik
  5. Dpaul7

    PORPOISE VERTEBRA 1.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Porpoise Vertebra North Carolina Miocene Age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Porpoises are a group of fully aquatic marine mammals that are sometimes referred to as mereswine,[1] all of which are classified under the family Phocoenidae, parvorder Odontoceti (toothed whales). There are six extant species of porpoise. They are small toothed whales that are very closely related to oceanic dolphins. The most obvious visible difference between the two groups is that porpoises have shorter beaks and flattened, spade-shaped teeth distinct from the conical teeth of dolphins. Porpoises, and other
  6. Dpaul7

    PORPOISE VERTEBRA 1.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Porpoise Vertebra North Carolina Miocene Age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Porpoises are a group of fully aquatic marine mammals that are sometimes referred to as mereswine,[1] all of which are classified under the family Phocoenidae, parvorder Odontoceti (toothed whales). There are six extant species of porpoise. They are small toothed whales that are very closely related to oceanic dolphins. The most obvious visible difference between the two groups is that porpoises have shorter beaks and flattened, spade-shaped teeth distinct from the conical teeth of dolphins. Porpoises, and other
  7. Dpaul7

    PORPOISE VERTEBRA 1.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Porpoise Vertebra North Carolina Miocene Age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Porpoises are a group of fully aquatic marine mammals that are sometimes referred to as mereswine,[1] all of which are classified under the family Phocoenidae, parvorder Odontoceti (toothed whales). There are six extant species of porpoise. They are small toothed whales that are very closely related to oceanic dolphins. The most obvious visible difference between the two groups is that porpoises have shorter beaks and flattened, spade-shaped teeth distinct from the conical teeth of dolphins. Porpoises, and other
  8. Dpaul7

    PORPOISE VERTEBRA 1.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Porpoise Vertebra North Carolina Miocene Age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Porpoises are a group of fully aquatic marine mammals that are sometimes referred to as mereswine,[1] all of which are classified under the family Phocoenidae, parvorder Odontoceti (toothed whales). There are six extant species of porpoise. They are small toothed whales that are very closely related to oceanic dolphins. The most obvious visible difference between the two groups is that porpoises have shorter beaks and flattened, spade-shaped teeth distinct from the conical teeth of dolphins. Porpoises, and other
  9. Dpaul7

    Odontoceti VERTEBRA 1.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Odontoceti Whale Vertebra SITE LOCATION: North Carolina TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: The toothed whales (systematic name Odontoceti) are a parvorder of cetaceans that includes dolphins, porpoises, and all other whales possessing teeth, such as the beaked whales and sperm whales. Seventy-three species of toothed whales (also called odontocetes) are described. They are one of two living groups of cetaceans, the other being the baleen whales (Mysticeti), which have baleen instead of teeth. The two groups are th
  10. Dpaul7

    Odontoceti VERTEBRA 1.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Odontoceti Whale Vertebra SITE LOCATION: North Carolina TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: The toothed whales (systematic name Odontoceti) are a parvorder of cetaceans that includes dolphins, porpoises, and all other whales possessing teeth, such as the beaked whales and sperm whales. Seventy-three species of toothed whales (also called odontocetes) are described. They are one of two living groups of cetaceans, the other being the baleen whales (Mysticeti), which have baleen instead of teeth. The two groups are th
  11. Dpaul7

    Odontoceti VERTEBRA 1.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Odontoceti Whale Vertebra SITE LOCATION: North Carolina TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: The toothed whales (systematic name Odontoceti) are a parvorder of cetaceans that includes dolphins, porpoises, and all other whales possessing teeth, such as the beaked whales and sperm whales. Seventy-three species of toothed whales (also called odontocetes) are described. They are one of two living groups of cetaceans, the other being the baleen whales (Mysticeti), which have baleen instead of teeth. The two groups are th
  12. Dpaul7

    Odontoceti VERTEBRA 1.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Odontoceti Whale Vertebra SITE LOCATION: North Carolina TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: The toothed whales (systematic name Odontoceti) are a parvorder of cetaceans that includes dolphins, porpoises, and all other whales possessing teeth, such as the beaked whales and sperm whales. Seventy-three species of toothed whales (also called odontocetes) are described. They are one of two living groups of cetaceans, the other being the baleen whales (Mysticeti), which have baleen instead of teeth. The two groups are th
  13. Dpaul7

    Odontoceti VERTEBRA 1.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Odontoceti Whale Vertebra SITE LOCATION: North Carolina TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: The toothed whales (systematic name Odontoceti) are a parvorder of cetaceans that includes dolphins, porpoises, and all other whales possessing teeth, such as the beaked whales and sperm whales. Seventy-three species of toothed whales (also called odontocetes) are described. They are one of two living groups of cetaceans, the other being the baleen whales (Mysticeti), which have baleen instead of teeth. The two groups are th
  14. Dpaul7

    Odontoceti VERTEBRA 1.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Odontoceti Whale Vertebra SITE LOCATION: North Carolina TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: The toothed whales (systematic name Odontoceti) are a parvorder of cetaceans that includes dolphins, porpoises, and all other whales possessing teeth, such as the beaked whales and sperm whales. Seventy-three species of toothed whales (also called odontocetes) are described. They are one of two living groups of cetaceans, the other being the baleen whales (Mysticeti), which have baleen instead of teeth. The two groups are th
  15. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Hemipristis serra (Snaggletooth shark) Teeth SITE LOCATION: Pungo Pits, Aurora, North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Hemipristis is a genus of weasel shark, family Hemigaleidae. It contains one extant species, the snaggletooth shark (H. elongata), as well as several extinct species. Hemipristis has two distinct type of teeth in each section of its jaw. The ones on the upper jaw act like knives, cutting through the flesh of the prey, while the pointed ones on the bottom act like forks, spearing th
  16. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Hemipristis serra (Snaggletooth shark) Teeth SITE LOCATION: Pungo Pits, Aurora, North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Hemipristis is a genus of weasel shark, family Hemigaleidae. It contains one extant species, the snaggletooth shark (H. elongata), as well as several extinct species. Hemipristis has two distinct type of teeth in each section of its jaw. The ones on the upper jaw act like knives, cutting through the flesh of the prey, while the pointed ones on the bottom act like forks, spearing th
  17. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Hemipristis serra (Snaggletooth shark) Teeth SITE LOCATION: Pungo Pits, Aurora, North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Hemipristis is a genus of weasel shark, family Hemigaleidae. It contains one extant species, the snaggletooth shark (H. elongata), as well as several extinct species. Hemipristis has two distinct type of teeth in each section of its jaw. The ones on the upper jaw act like knives, cutting through the flesh of the prey, while the pointed ones on the bottom act like forks, spearing th
  18. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Hemipristis serra (Snaggletooth shark) Teeth SITE LOCATION: Pungo Pits, Aurora, North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Hemipristis is a genus of weasel shark, family Hemigaleidae. It contains one extant species, the snaggletooth shark (H. elongata), as well as several extinct species. Hemipristis has two distinct type of teeth in each section of its jaw. The ones on the upper jaw act like knives, cutting through the flesh of the prey, while the pointed ones on the bottom act like forks, spearing th
  19. Dpaul7

    Bonita Nose Fossil a.JPG

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Bonita Nose Fossil SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Sarda is a genus of medium-sized, predatory ray-finned bony fish in the Scombridae family, and belonging to the tribe Sardini, more commonly called the Bonito tribe. There are four species which comprise the Sarda genus. One of those species, the Pacific bonito, is further divided into two subspecies. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata
  20. Dpaul7

    Bonita Nose Fossil a.JPG

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Bonita Nose Fossil SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Sarda is a genus of medium-sized, predatory ray-finned bony fish in the Scombridae family, and belonging to the tribe Sardini, more commonly called the Bonito tribe. There are four species which comprise the Sarda genus. One of those species, the Pacific bonito, is further divided into two subspecies. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata
  21. Dpaul7

    Bonita Nose Fossil a.JPG

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Bonita Nose Fossil SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Sarda is a genus of medium-sized, predatory ray-finned bony fish in the Scombridae family, and belonging to the tribe Sardini, more commonly called the Bonito tribe. There are four species which comprise the Sarda genus. One of those species, the Pacific bonito, is further divided into two subspecies. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata
  22. Dpaul7

    Ray Stinger Barb fossil a.JPG

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Ray Stinger Barb fossil SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Stingrays are a group of rays, which are cartilaginous fish related to sharks. They are classified in the suborder Myliobatoidei of the order Myliobatiformes and consist of eight families: Hexatrygonidae (sixgill stingray), Plesiobatidae (deepwater stingray), Urolophidae (stingarees), Urotrygonidae (round rays), Dasyatidae (whiptail stingrays), Potamotrygonidae (riv
  23. Dpaul7

    Ray Stinger Barb fossil a.JPG

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Ray Stinger Barb fossil SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Stingrays are a group of rays, which are cartilaginous fish related to sharks. They are classified in the suborder Myliobatoidei of the order Myliobatiformes and consist of eight families: Hexatrygonidae (sixgill stingray), Plesiobatidae (deepwater stingray), Urolophidae (stingarees), Urotrygonidae (round rays), Dasyatidae (whiptail stingrays), Potamotrygonidae (riv
  24. Dpaul7

    Dolphin Teeth Fossils.JPG

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Dolphin Teeth Fossils SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Dolphins are a widely distributed and diverse group of aquatic mammals. They are an informal grouping within the order Cetacea, excluding whales and porpoises, so to zoologists the grouping is paraphyletic. The dolphins comprise the extant families Delphinidae (the oceanic dolphins), Platanistidae (the Indian river dolphins), Iniidae (the new world river dolphins), an
  25. Dpaul7

    Coprolites.JPG

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Coprolites SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: A coprolite is fossilized feces. Coprolites are classified as trace fossils as opposed to body fossils, as they give evidence for the animal's behaviour (in this case, diet) rather than morphology. The name is derived from the Greek words (kopros, meaning "dung") and (lithos, meaning "stone"). They were first described by William Buckland in 1829. Prior to this they were known a
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