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Found 65 results

  1. Dolphin Inner Ear Bone Fossil a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Dolphin Inner Ear Bone Fossil SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Dolphins are a widely distributed and diverse group of aquatic mammals. They are an informal grouping within the order Cetacea, excluding whales and porpoises, so to zoologists the grouping is paraphyletic. The dolphins comprise the extant families Delphinidae (the oceanic dolphins), Platanistidae (the Indian river dolphins), Iniidae (the new world river dolphins), and Pontoporiidae (the brackish dolphins), and the extinct Lipotidae (baiji or Chinese river dolphin). There are 40 extant species of dolphins. Dolphins, alongside other cetaceans, belong to the clade Cetartiodactyla with even-toed ungulates. Cetaceans' closest living relatives are the hippopotamuses, having diverged about 40 million years ago. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Cetartiodactyla
  2. Fossil Crab Claws a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Fossil Crab Claws SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Crabs are decapod crustaceans of the infraorder Brachyura, which typically have a very short projecting "tail" (abdomen), usually entirely hidden under the thorax. They live in all the world's oceans, in fresh water, and on land, are generally covered with a thick exoskeleton and have a single pair of claws. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Euarthropoda Class: Malacostraca Order: Decapoda
  3. Fossil Crab Claws a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Fossil Crab Claws SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Crabs are decapod crustaceans of the infraorder Brachyura, which typically have a very short projecting "tail" (abdomen), usually entirely hidden under the thorax. They live in all the world's oceans, in fresh water, and on land, are generally covered with a thick exoskeleton and have a single pair of claws. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Euarthropoda Class: Malacostraca Order: Decapoda
  4. Dolphin Boe Fossils b.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Dolphin Bone Fossils SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Dolphins are a widely distributed and diverse group of aquatic mammals. They are an informal grouping within the order Cetacea, excluding whales and porpoises, so to zoologists the grouping is paraphyletic. The dolphins comprise the extant families Delphinidae (the oceanic dolphins), Platanistidae (the Indian river dolphins), Iniidae (the new world river dolphins), and Pontoporiidae (the brackish dolphins), and the extinct Lipotidae (baiji or Chinese river dolphin). There are 40 extant species of dolphins. Dolphins, alongside other cetaceans, belong to the clade Cetartiodactyla with even-toed ungulates. Cetaceans' closest living relatives are the hippopotamuses, having diverged about 40 million years ago. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Cetartiodactyla
  5. Dolphin Boe Fossils b.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Dolphin Bone Fossils SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Dolphins are a widely distributed and diverse group of aquatic mammals. They are an informal grouping within the order Cetacea, excluding whales and porpoises, so to zoologists the grouping is paraphyletic. The dolphins comprise the extant families Delphinidae (the oceanic dolphins), Platanistidae (the Indian river dolphins), Iniidae (the new world river dolphins), and Pontoporiidae (the brackish dolphins), and the extinct Lipotidae (baiji or Chinese river dolphin). There are 40 extant species of dolphins. Dolphins, alongside other cetaceans, belong to the clade Cetartiodactyla with even-toed ungulates. Cetaceans' closest living relatives are the hippopotamuses, having diverged about 40 million years ago. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Cetartiodactyla
  6. Fossil Sea Urchin Spines.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Fossil Sea Urchin Spines SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Sea urchins or urchins, archaically called sea hedgehogs, are small, spiny, globular animals that, with their close kin, such as sand dollars, constitute the class Echinoidea of the echinoderm phylum. Sea urchins have globe- to flattened-shaped bodies covered with spines. They are non-aggressive marine animals found all over the world. They live in shallow, rocky bottoms, or hide in sandy cervices. Human contact with sea urchins is either accidental or intentional. People accidentally step on them in shallow surf, or intentionally pick up the urchins, unaware that they must handle the spines with care to avoid injury. Sea urchins have two types of venomous organs - spines and pedicellaria. Spines produce puncture wounds. Pedicellaria are small, delicate seizing organs that lie between the spines and release venom when they attach to an object. A puncture injury from a sea urchin can cause swelling and redness around the area, which may lead to severe pain and infection. Multiple deep puncture wounds may cause fatigue, weakness, muscle aches, shock, paralysis, and respiratory failure. Death may occur. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Class: Echinoidea
  7. Conus sp a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Conus Gastropod SITE LOCATION: James City Formation, North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Conus is a genus of predatory sea snails, or cone snails, marine gastropod mollusks in the family Conidae. Prior to 2009, cone snail species had all traditionally been grouped into the single genus Conus. However, Conus is now more precisely defined, and there are several other accepted genera of cone snails. For a list of the currently accepted genera, see Conidae. For a list of the currently accepted species within the genus Conus, based on the information in the World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS) list, see: list of Conus species. Species in the genus Conus sensu stricto can be found in the tropical and subtropical seas of the world, at depths ranging from the sublittoral to 1,000 m. They are very variable in some of their characters, such as the tuberculation of the spire and body whorl, striae, colors and the pattern of coloring. Many fossil species have been described; they are extensively distributed, and first appear in Cretaceous strata. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Gastropoda Family: Conidae Genus: Conus
  8. Conus sp a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Conus Gastropod SITE LOCATION: James City Formation, North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Conus is a genus of predatory sea snails, or cone snails, marine gastropod mollusks in the family Conidae. Prior to 2009, cone snail species had all traditionally been grouped into the single genus Conus. However, Conus is now more precisely defined, and there are several other accepted genera of cone snails. For a list of the currently accepted genera, see Conidae. For a list of the currently accepted species within the genus Conus, based on the information in the World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS) list, see: list of Conus species. Species in the genus Conus sensu stricto can be found in the tropical and subtropical seas of the world, at depths ranging from the sublittoral to 1,000 m. They are very variable in some of their characters, such as the tuberculation of the spire and body whorl, striae, colors and the pattern of coloring. Many fossil species have been described; they are extensively distributed, and first appear in Cretaceous strata. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Gastropoda Family: Conidae Genus: Conus
  9. Fossil Marginella Gastropod a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Fossil Marginella Gastropod SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Marginella is a genus of small tropical and temperate sea snails, marine gastropod molluscs in the family Marginellidae, the margin snails. It is the type genus of the family. The shells of species in this genus are rounded, smooth and glossy, with a large aperture that appears to be toothed because it shows the edge of the columellar folds. In many species the shells are colorful. The glossy surface of the shell results from the fact that the mantle covers most of the shell when the animal is active. As is typical in the Neogastropoda, the animal has a long siphon. When the animal is active, the foot extends much further out than the edge of the shell. As is also typical for the Neogastropoda, species in this genus are carnivorous and predatory. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Gastropoda Family: Marginellidae Genus: Marginella
  10. Fossil Marginella Gastropod a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Fossil Marginella Gastropod SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Marginella is a genus of small tropical and temperate sea snails, marine gastropod molluscs in the family Marginellidae, the margin snails. It is the type genus of the family. The shells of species in this genus are rounded, smooth and glossy, with a large aperture that appears to be toothed because it shows the edge of the columellar folds. In many species the shells are colorful. The glossy surface of the shell results from the fact that the mantle covers most of the shell when the animal is active. As is typical in the Neogastropoda, the animal has a long siphon. When the animal is active, the foot extends much further out than the edge of the shell. As is also typical for the Neogastropoda, species in this genus are carnivorous and predatory. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Gastropoda Family: Marginellidae Genus: Marginella
  11. Turtle Shell a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Turtle Shell fragment fossil SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: The Pliocene turtle fauna of the mid-Atlantic coast and coastal plain contained extinct and modern genera. Turtles are reptiles of the order Testudines (or Chelonii[3]) characterized by a special bony or cartilaginous shell developed from their ribs and acting as a shield. "Turtle" may refer to the order as a whole (American English) or to fresh-water and sea-dwelling testudines (British English). Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Reptilia Order: Testudines
  12. Turtle Shell a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Turtle Shell fragment fossil SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: The Pliocene turtle fauna of the mid-Atlantic coast and coastal plain contained extinct and modern genera. Turtles are reptiles of the order Testudines (or Chelonii[3]) characterized by a special bony or cartilaginous shell developed from their ribs and acting as a shield. "Turtle" may refer to the order as a whole (American English) or to fresh-water and sea-dwelling testudines (British English). Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Reptilia Order: Testudines
  13. Balanus sp. Barnacle Fossil a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Balanus sp. Barnacle Fossil SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Balanus is a genus of barnacles in the family Balanidae of the subphylum Crustacea. This genus is known in the fossil record from the Jurassic to the Quaternary periods (age range: from 189.6 to 0.0 million years ago.). Fossil shells within this genus have been found all over the world. A barnacle is a type of arthropod constituting the infraclass Cirripedia in the subphylum Crustacea, and is hence related to crabs and lobsters. Barnacles are exclusively marine, and tend to live in shallow and tidal waters, typically in erosive settings. They are sessile (nonmotile) suspension feeders, and have two nektonic (active swimming) larval stages. Around 1,220 barnacle species are currently known. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Class: Maxillopoda Order: Sessilia Family: Balanidae Genus: Balanus
  14. Balanus sp. Barnacle Fossil a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Balanus sp. Barnacle Fossil SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Balanus is a genus of barnacles in the family Balanidae of the subphylum Crustacea. This genus is known in the fossil record from the Jurassic to the Quaternary periods (age range: from 189.6 to 0.0 million years ago.). Fossil shells within this genus have been found all over the world. A barnacle is a type of arthropod constituting the infraclass Cirripedia in the subphylum Crustacea, and is hence related to crabs and lobsters. Barnacles are exclusively marine, and tend to live in shallow and tidal waters, typically in erosive settings. They are sessile (nonmotile) suspension feeders, and have two nektonic (active swimming) larval stages. Around 1,220 barnacle species are currently known. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Class: Maxillopoda Order: Sessilia Family: Balanidae Genus: Balanus
  15. Shark Vertebrae a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Shark Vertebrae SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Sharks are a group of elasmobranch fish characterized by a cartilaginous skeleton, five to seven gill slits on the sides of the head, and pectoral fins that are not fused to the head. Modern sharks are classified within the clade Selachimorpha (or Selachii) and are the sister group to the rays. However, the term "shark" has also been used for extinct members of the subclass Elasmobranchii outside the Selachimorpha, such as Cladoselache and Xenacanthus, as well as other Chondrichthyes such as the holocephalid eugenedontidans. Under this broader definition, the earliest known sharks date back to more than 420 million years ago. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Chondrichthyes
  16. Shark Vertebrae a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Shark Vertebrae SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Sharks are a group of elasmobranch fish characterized by a cartilaginous skeleton, five to seven gill slits on the sides of the head, and pectoral fins that are not fused to the head. Modern sharks are classified within the clade Selachimorpha (or Selachii) and are the sister group to the rays. However, the term "shark" has also been used for extinct members of the subclass Elasmobranchii outside the Selachimorpha, such as Cladoselache and Xenacanthus, as well as other Chondrichthyes such as the holocephalid eugenedontidans. Under this broader definition, the earliest known sharks date back to more than 420 million years ago. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Chondrichthyes
  17. Shark Vertebrae a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Shark Vertebrae SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Sharks are a group of elasmobranch fish characterized by a cartilaginous skeleton, five to seven gill slits on the sides of the head, and pectoral fins that are not fused to the head. Modern sharks are classified within the clade Selachimorpha (or Selachii) and are the sister group to the rays. However, the term "shark" has also been used for extinct members of the subclass Elasmobranchii outside the Selachimorpha, such as Cladoselache and Xenacanthus, as well as other Chondrichthyes such as the holocephalid eugenedontidans. Under this broader definition, the earliest known sharks date back to more than 420 million years ago. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Chondrichthyes
  18. Fish Vertebrae a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Fish Vertebrae SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Fish are the gill-bearing aquatic craniate animals that lack limbs with digits. They form a sister group to the tunicates, together forming the olfactores. Included in this definition are the living hagfish, lampreys, and cartilaginous and bony fish as well as various extinct related groups. Tetrapods emerged within lobe-finned fishes, so cladistically they are fish as well. However, traditionally fish are rendered paraphyletic by excluding the tetrapods (i.e., the amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals which all descended from within the same ancestry). Because in this manner the term "fish" is defined negatively as a paraphyletic group, it is not considered a formal taxonomic grouping in systematic biology. The traditional term pisces (also ichthyes) is considered a typological, but not a phylogenetic classification. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Osteichthyes
  19. Fish Vertebrae a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Fish Vertebrae SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Fish are the gill-bearing aquatic craniate animals that lack limbs with digits. They form a sister group to the tunicates, together forming the olfactores. Included in this definition are the living hagfish, lampreys, and cartilaginous and bony fish as well as various extinct related groups. Tetrapods emerged within lobe-finned fishes, so cladistically they are fish as well. However, traditionally fish are rendered paraphyletic by excluding the tetrapods (i.e., the amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals which all descended from within the same ancestry). Because in this manner the term "fish" is defined negatively as a paraphyletic group, it is not considered a formal taxonomic grouping in systematic biology. The traditional term pisces (also ichthyes) is considered a typological, but not a phylogenetic classification. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Osteichthyes
  20. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Tetraodontidae (Puffer fish) gill plates SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: The Tetraodontidae are a family of primarily marine and estuarine fish of the order Tetraodontiformes. The family includes many familiar species which are variously called pufferfish, puffers, balloonfish, blowfish, blowies, bubblefish, globefish, swellfish, toadfish, toadies, honey toads, sugar toads, and sea squab. Pufferfishes and porcupinefishes share the order Tetraodontiformes with the triggerfishes, filefishes, boxfishes and their relatives. The tetraodontiforms (or plectognaths) include around 300 species from eight families. Though incredibly diverse, this broad group can be characterized as having modified scales that serve as plates or spines with resultantly restricted gill openings. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Actinopterygii Order: Tetraodontiformes Family: Tetraodontidae
  21. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Tetraodontidae (Puffer fish) gill plates SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: The Tetraodontidae are a family of primarily marine and estuarine fish of the order Tetraodontiformes. The family includes many familiar species which are variously called pufferfish, puffers, balloonfish, blowfish, blowies, bubblefish, globefish, swellfish, toadfish, toadies, honey toads, sugar toads, and sea squab. Pufferfishes and porcupinefishes share the order Tetraodontiformes with the triggerfishes, filefishes, boxfishes and their relatives. The tetraodontiforms (or plectognaths) include around 300 species from eight families. Though incredibly diverse, this broad group can be characterized as having modified scales that serve as plates or spines with resultantly restricted gill openings. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Actinopterygii Order: Tetraodontiformes Family: Tetraodontidae
  22. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Chilomycterus (burrfish) mouth plate SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Chilomycterus is a genus of diodontid tetraodontiform fishes commonly called "burrfish." The burrfish resembles the puffer in the positions of its dorsal and anal fins, but its skin is armed with short, stout, triangular spines instead of being merely prickly. These spines are sparsely scattered all over the trunk, with about 9 or 10 from nose to tail along any given line. Furthermore, the burrfish is oval in outline, not fusiform like the puffer; the openings of its nostrils are prolonged in a single tubular tentacle; its bony jaw plates are not divided by a median suture as they are in the puffer, hence each jaw apparently is armed with a single very broad incisor tooth instead of with two; the pectoral fins are not only much larger than in the puffer but their upper edge is level with the upper corner of the gill openings in the burrfish (considerable below it in the puffers); its eye is round, not oval; and its anal fin is below the dorsal, not behind the latter. We need only add that the soft dorsal and anal fins (it has no spiny dorsal) are both rounded, each has 10 to 12 rays; the caudal fin is very narrow and round-tipped; the pectorals are much broader than long, and there are no ventral fins. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Actinopterygii Order: Tetraodontiformes Family: Diodontidae Genus: Chilomycterus
  23. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Chilomycterus (burrfish) mouth plate SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Chilomycterus is a genus of diodontid tetraodontiform fishes commonly called "burrfish." The burrfish resembles the puffer in the positions of its dorsal and anal fins, but its skin is armed with short, stout, triangular spines instead of being merely prickly. These spines are sparsely scattered all over the trunk, with about 9 or 10 from nose to tail along any given line. Furthermore, the burrfish is oval in outline, not fusiform like the puffer; the openings of its nostrils are prolonged in a single tubular tentacle; its bony jaw plates are not divided by a median suture as they are in the puffer, hence each jaw apparently is armed with a single very broad incisor tooth instead of with two; the pectoral fins are not only much larger than in the puffer but their upper edge is level with the upper corner of the gill openings in the burrfish (considerable below it in the puffers); its eye is round, not oval; and its anal fin is below the dorsal, not behind the latter. We need only add that the soft dorsal and anal fins (it has no spiny dorsal) are both rounded, each has 10 to 12 rays; the caudal fin is very narrow and round-tipped; the pectorals are much broader than long, and there are no ventral fins. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Actinopterygii Order: Tetraodontiformes Family: Diodontidae Genus: Chilomycterus
  24. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Bull or Dusky shark tooth Carcharhinus sp. SITE LOCATION: Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Carcharhinus is the type genus of the family Carcharhinidae, the requiem sharks. One of 12 genera in its family, it contains over half of the species therein. It contains 35 extant species to date, with likely more species yet to be described. Requiem sharks are sharks of the family Carcharhinidae in the order Carcharhiniformes, containing migratory, live-bearing sharks of warm seas (sometimes of brackish or fresh water) such as the spinner shark, the blacknose shark, the blacktip shark, the blacktail reef shark, and the blacktip reef shark. The name may be related to the French word for shark, requin, which is itself of disputed etymology. One derivation of the latter is from Latin requiem ("rest"), which would thereby create a cyclic etymology (requiem-requin-requiem), but other sources derive it from the verb reschignier ("to grimace while baring teeth"). Family members have the usual carcharhiniform characteristics. Their eyes are round, and one or two gill slits fall over the pectoral fin base. Most species are viviparous, the young being born fully developed. They vary widely in size, from as small as 69 cm (2.26 ft) adult length in the Australian sharpnose shark, up to 5.5 m (18 ft) adult length in the tiger shark. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Chondrichthyes Order: Carcharhiniformes Family: Carcharhinidae Genus: Carcharhinus
  25. Myliobatis sp. (Ray) dental plates.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Myliobatis sp. dental plates SITE LOCATION: Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Myliobatis is a genus of eagle rays in the family Myliobatidae. Myliobatis species can reach a length of about 150 centimetres (59 in). Body consist of a rhomboidal disc, wider than long, with a one dorsal fin. The head is broad and short, with eyes and spiracles on the sides. The tail is slender, with 1-2 large spines at the base, without tail fin. The teeth are arranged in the lower and upper jaw in flat tooth plates called pavement teeth, each consisting of about 7 series of plates. Said mouth plates are useful to crush clam shells and crustaceans. The extinct species Myliobatis dixoni is known from Tertiary deposits along the Atlantic seaboards of the United States, Brazil, Nigeria, England, and Germany. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Chondrichthyes Order: Myliobatiformes Family: Myliobatidae Genus: Myliobatis
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