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Found 12 results

  1. Fossil Identification in Western Wisconsin

    *Higher resolution and many more images linked below to Google Drive for a clear view* Fossil: Large limestone rock containing hundreds of marine fossils and with what appears to be a bone roughly 3cm in diameter. As well what appears to be the remains of other bone structures. Location: Found 10 miles from the Mississippi River near Ellsworth, Wisconsin USA (Western Wisconsin) in a low valley area that looks like an ancient river bed. Rock Measurements: Roughly 15cm x 28cm My Understanding of Geology and Paleontology: 2/10 *There are a vast amount of images so I'd uploaded them to Google Drive in high resolution here: https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=1-QkitLR3bwWFEn0Dh6OoNngsH8F5O31w I found this large limestone rock on our property near what I imagine would be an ancient riverway located at the bottom of a recharge point (aka hill). During heavy rains this area can literally turn in to a river and wash the soil down stream. This rock appears to contain all of the common marine fossils you'd find in Western Wisconsin from what I've researched. However, there's what appears to be a bone or unusual looking aquatic creature near the snail as shown. The snail was extremely well preserved before the vinegar soaking ate the shell and pigment away. A bit more about the location in which it was found; I had been landscaping the slope of the soil for about 2 years in the backyard by shovel. I had lived in this home for about 4 years and I found the soil to be unusual versus any other home I've lived in nearby. The heavy, wet clay soil contained many large green basalt rocks - I'd never seen one before this time. The bedrock is limestone but about 100 FT away the bedrock is sandstone (according to geological maps). The Mississippi river is 10 miles from this location in western Wisconsin near Minnesota. It's also in the path of the "Great Midcontinent Rift" which I find interesting. There are also many large "bluffs" and rolling hills. It's a beautiful area. Anyhow, I'd like to find out what else may be in this rock. It has been in vinegar for about 2-years and is slowly changing shape which in my imagination resembles a skull. I'd like to find a means to protect the exposed fossils while the limestone is absorbing. I had read something about fossil glue or plaster that can protect the exposed fossils while in the acetic acid. This is an educational experiment for me and I've always wanted to learn about paleontology and geology. Any help and identification would be appreciated! There are so many fossils and things to look at in this rock that I uploaded the images to a public folder on Google Drive so that others can view them in a higher resolution. My Galaxy Note 8 is not the best at focusing on close up images so please forgive my photography. If you see something interesting I'd be curious to know! Thanks! -Jack from Western Wisconsin (Google Drive images: https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=1-QkitLR3bwWFEn0Dh6OoNngsH8F5O31w)
  2. Geology: Tiny zircon crystals help trace the birth of the mighty Mississippi By Dale Gnidovec, The Columbus Dispatch, Nov 11, 2018 https://www.dispatch.com/news/20181111/geology-tiny-zircon-crystals-help-trace-birth-of-mighty-mississippi Potter-McIntyre, S.L., Breeden, J.R. and Malone, D.H., 2018. A Maastrichtian birth of the Ancestral Mississippi River system: Evidence from the U-Pb detrital zircon geochronology of the McNairy Sandstone, Illinois, USA. Cretaceous Research. Volume 91, November 2018, Pages 71-79 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0195667117305414 Yours, Paul H.
  3. Help in identifying please

    Hello everyone,I am looking for help to figure out if this is a fossil,and what type,it was found in Northeast Missouri,near the Mississippi river,I am told it is quartz,it is mostly a clear color but has bone white nodules in places,that is about all I know of it,I am a new member so if my post is incorrect I apologize,I am happy to receive any and all information and opinion and wish to Thank everyone in advance. gmanp135
  4. Help with Oyster shell Identification

    Greetings Guys! I had a question relative to this Oyster shell. It was found on the bank of the Mississippi river, out of New Orleans. Being from Louisiana, I "sho nuff" know an oyster shell when I see one. The curiosity of this one is where it was found. No trash pile, no oyster bed, just simply on the sand on the river bank where the water level is has gone down. I'm trying to figure out if this could be a oyster fossil. At this point in the river, it is 100% fresh water, whereas oysters like salt, or brackish water. Any thoughts from you guys, gals, would be greatly appreciated. Joe
  5. I had a question relative to this sea shell. It was found on the bank of the Mississippi river, out of New Orleans. The curiosity of this one is where it was found. just simply on the sand on the river bank where the water level is has gone down. I'm trying to figure out if this could be a sea shell fossil. At this location of the river, it is 100% fresh water, whereas this looks like salt water sea shell. Any thoughts from yawl would be greatly appreciated. Joe Any thoughts from you guys, gals, would be greatly appreciated.
  6. Fossil concretion, tooth or man made???

    Mystery here. I found this near home on the banks of the Mississippi River here in east central Iowa. The geology in this area ranges from Ordovician to Pennsylvanian but with lots of glacial erratics and glacial mixing, not to mention the river mixing everything up!! It looks like a fossil concretion kinda like the Mazon Creek ones but is unusually polished, like a celt. Any input would be much appreciated!
  7. Any ideas

    This thing is heavy and I'm not sure if it's a fossil but it's not metal and it looks like it is covered in enamel. It's about 2" long and 1-1/4" wide and 1/2 " thick.
  8. MissRiverHorseTeeth

    From the album Jerry's Really Old Stuff

    Fossil horse molars found along the Mississippi River by Mr Lea during the mid 1970s. I donated these to the University of East Tennessee. During low water periods collectors and others find fossil bones on the numerous sand bars and small islands exposed during dry periods. They wash from desposits eroded along the river bank and end up exposed on sand bars. A wide range of Pleistocene fossils are found including mastodon, horse, bison, sloth, etc.
  9. Richardson's Landing vertebrae

    From the album Jerry's Really Old Stuff

    This horse vertebrae was found at the Richardson's landing Pleistocene site on the Mississippi River Tipton County, TN just north of Memphis by my brother's friend Mike. The site is well known for peccary, bear, mastodon and other period fossils. Mike gave them to my brother who gave them to me in 2013. Also included in the group were pieces of fossil horse molars and a nearly complete horse femur. The Memphis Museum owns Pleistocene fossils from this site.
  10. Mississippi River Fossils

    From the album Jerry's Really Old Stuff

    Fossils collected by Mr. Lea of Memphis along the Mississippi River during low water periods during the mid 1970s. After his death in 2013 my brother obtained these fossils and I donated them to the University of East Tennessee. They include a bear mandible, bison metatarsal, couple of pieces of mastodon bone plus various other Pleistocene era bone fragments. Some of these were probably found at the Richardson's Landing Pleistocene site on the Mississippi River Tipton County, TN.
  11. Low water levels on the Mississippi exposing massive fossils, WCSH6, October 24, 2012, http://www.wcsh6.com...massive-fossils Low Mississippi River levels attract fossil hunters, KSDK Channel 5, http://www.ksdk.com/...-fossil-hunters Prehistoric Possessions by Shana O'Malley, The Cleveland Current, Bolivar County, Mississippi, October 5, 2012, http://webcache.goog...n&ct=clnk&gl=us See figures 4 to 6 on page 30 of: Dockery, D. T., III, 2012, The Droughts of 2012, 1988, 1980-1982, AND 1956. Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality Environmental News. vol. 9, no. 8 (Sept.), pp. 26-30. http://www.deq.state...pdf?OpenElement Mississippi Office of Geology Newsletters (Newsletter Archive - http://www.deq.state...ve?OpenDocument ) best wishes, Paul H.
  12. The Looper Collection

    A family of fossil hunters collects specimens from the Mississippi River in northwest Louisiana, northeast Mississippi, and southeast Arkansas. They've displayed their finds on the below linked website. Among the most exciting fossils in my opinion are of manatee and stag-moose. The latter is very rare in southeastern fossil sites and must date to a cold stadial . The manatee must date to a warm interglacial or interstadial. http://www.cwreplicas.com/index1.html
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