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  1. I went today to the museum of natural history Lille Northern France,nice place to visit!
  2. I've been to a least a few museums where they would have a part of an exhibit dedicated to the Carboniferous era (of which the Field Museum's section for that in the Evolving Planet is pretty good). But I do wonder what would it be like if a whole A grade small to medium sized museum opened dedicated solely to the fossils found in the Mazon Creek area, including the Essex Fauna. It could be located close to the Mazonia-Braidwood State Fish and Wildlife area and include life sized reconstructions of both the terrestrial and aquatic environments. It could also be a place where fossil hunters cou
  3. A10Airknight

    Is this an egg?

    Hi everyone, First, thank you very much for your help in identifying fossils! I just discovered this resource, and am grateful it exists. I found this unknown piece in a collections storage closet in the museum I work for. It was mixed in with other fossils and geology samples. Unfortunately, it was unlabeled, and so I do not know where or even when it was found. Again, thank you for your help, and I apologize for not having more information about the piece. If you need any other pictures, I would be happy to take them.
  4. During the Summer, I had the fortune of driving near Seymour, TX and thus the opportunity to pay a visit to the WMNH. The WMNH is a small but unique museum in Northern Texas, specializing in the Early Permian fauna that lived nearby ~ 290 million years ago in the famous Texas "red beds." The land around Seymour was once an equatorial bayou, humid and inundated with rivers and lakes. In the rivers were lungfish like those that live today, various ray-finned fishes, and cartilaginous fish like the Xenacanth "sharks." Amphibians like Eryops, Seymouria, and Diplocaulus also spent much
  5. Hey all! I am currently helping to identify rocks and minerals for a museum and came across this piece of, what I believe is, petrified wood. I have never seen one that looks like this, however. It is highly solicified and looks rather similar to a zebra mussel. Any thoughts on what kind of petrified with this might be if at all?
  6. Hi everyone! I have just returned from a fieldschool to Poland which was organized by the BVP (Belgium Society for Paleontology) in association with the Universities of Opole and Gdansk. The fieldschool started on the 9th july and ended on july 17. The first 2-3 days of the trip took place in the historic city of Gdansk which lies by the Baltic Sea where the main focus was on Baltic Amber. This included lectures, workshops, a small museum tour and some trips to the beach in search for amber. For the 2nd part of the trip we travelled to the south towards Opole and more s
  7. I was in the area, so I made a very brief stop by the HMNS. I'll state up-front that this will be extremely dino-centric. What I saw was really great, they have a chronologically-organized display of animals from stromatolites to humans (I only made it to the Cretaceous). The lighting is very dramatic, so seeing it in person is much better than the dark photos portray (I did edit a few of them to enhance visibility). Lots of dynamic posing which is nice compared to other museums. Also, most specimens aren't behind glass, and you can get really close. I believe most of the skeleton
  8. Max-fossils

    Trix the T-Rex

    Hello fellow fossil enthusiasts, I should have posted this a long time ago, in fact I should have done it when I got home from the visit, but I guess I forgot... So here it is, with about 2 months of delay. So that day I went to the Naturalis museum in Leiden, Netherlands. I went there for a special reason: to see a record-holding fossil! And this legend is nothing less than Trix, the mighty T-Rex. What is special with Trix is that it's the only T-Rex fossil to be in a museum outside of America. Here is the story behind the beast: a couple were hiking in Montana,
  9. Some fossil specimens have garnered true fame, like Sue or Stan, but I'm curious about those beyond that too. We all know about these ultra famous specimens, but what about some lesser known named specimens? Actually, I just want to see some of the specimens that have really stood out to you, named or not... and if an ultra famous specimen is your favorite, throw that in too! Some things to include for the reading pleasure of others: - A photo of the specimen - the age of the specimen - The specimen name (or collection number, if you know it - otherwise jus
  10. Callahan

    F736057E-C68C-47CD-BDBF-4C8BD3A5D3D5

    From the album: 39 years exploring Texas

    Nature center displayed my collection.
  11. Callahan

    CF28A810-704B-40EA-BB52-52B53502D120

    From the album: 39 years exploring Texas

    My collection displayed at local nature center for several months.
  12. I spent a week or so recently in the north of Germany, mainly to spend some time with my son and his family, but I did take them all along one day for a sidetrip to the Urzeithof, of which I had learned through an interesting article about it in the last edition of the German journal "Fossilien". I must say, I was very impressed by what Frank Rudolph and his partner Katrin Mohr along with a large number of enthusiastic and engaged volunteers have managed to create over the last few years. Katrin, an enthusiastic hobby fossil collector, started the museum over 10 years ago when a barn on her hu
  13. Ptychodus04

    Texas Through Time

    My wife and I took the 90 minute drive south to visit the Texas Through Time museum in Hillsboro, TX yesterday. I met the director, Andre Lujan, in Tucson this year. The museum is housed in the historic Grimes Garage. It was built in 1917 (I think) and was the first garage/filling station with indoor restrooms. The museum is small but there are plans in the works for an expansion. If all goes through, it will be quite a facility in such a small town. The museum features fossils from 1800’s Texas, so this includes modern Texas, New Mexico, and Oklahoma. It is arranged in a clockwi
  14. For my birthday a couple of weeks ago, we had gone to the museum of ancient life at thanksgiving point in Utah. Here are some of the pictures that I took. Sorry that they're a bit blurry. The Gorgosaurus in the lobby. The prep station has been up and going. I think the fossils that are being prepped are from the morrison formation. Here are some vertebrae that had been prepared. The trilobites And TFF's favorite trilobite A Ceratosaurus, the brown is real bone Close up on the skull Some Supersaurus stuff, all on loan from
  15. Well it has finally opened to the public on December 4rth. "The new Dawn of Life Gallery" at The ROM is perhaps the best gallery on the planet covering the earliest life to the emergence of land dwelling creatures. I was fortunate to have a tiny part in the new gallery having prepared a number of the museums specimens and also having donated and sold them some pieces . Here is a tiny taste of what you can see in the new gallery. It will not disappoint.
  16. Over the weekend I spent some time at the Burpee Museum of Natural History in Rockford, Illinois. My primary reason for visiting was to check out their local Ordovician fossils, but I was quite surprised by how large and comprehensive the museum was. Lots of great fossils and cool dioramas, definitely worth a visit if you're in the area. Diorama of the Ordovician sea Trilobites Crinoids and an edrioasteroid Cephalopods Bivalves and gastropods Receptaculitids
  17. Last weekend I went to Crystal Mountain, it is a retail store with attached cafe, animal feeding, small rollercoaster (for the kids), large indoor playground etc overall a pretty cool place to visit. Under the shop there is a museum, which is what this post is about - not your typical museum, a lot of things are unlabeled unfortunately, it's quite small (just 3 large rooms with corridors) all set up to look like you're deep underground in a cave. These photos are in no particular order I got my youngest (6 years old) to pose in front of some of the really big crystals to add a bit o
  18. ‘South Jersey will be transformed’: Fossil museum coming to Gloucester County in 2023 Rowan University's Jean & Ric Edelman museum will feature interactive exhibits, local bones and more. by Allison Steele, The Philadephis Inquirer, October 9, 2021 $73M dinosaur fossil park and museum coming to N.J. NJCom, October 2021 Edelman Fossil Park, New Jersey Yours, Paul H.
  19. I have been in contact with the head of the University of Alaska Fairbanks and Museum for a couple years showing some of my better plant fossils from my area. Miocene age, Beluga Formation, This last week I had a Masters Degree student come and visit my collection and my local site. She is going to do her thesis on the local miocene flora. There are papers on plants presumed to be older and younger but none from this section of the formation. I donated approximately 100 lbs of specimens to the University of Alaska Fairbanks Museum of the North to be used by her then pu
  20. The Paleontological Society of Austin took a trip to the Museum for this months Field Trip. Collecting in August is not much fun unless you get out WAY early, so a nice Air Conditioned Museum sounded like a good idea! So we went to a small museum that has been open for only a couple of years, but has a really nice collection of Texas fossil (and a few other places, but primarily Texas). They are known for their work in the Permian Red Beds, so much of the focus is on that time period, but a nice selection of other eras as well. We were fortunate to get a "behind the museum" tour too, of their
  21. Shellseeker

    New, bigger megalodon size estimate

    https://www.floridamuseum.ufl.edu/science/school-lesson-leads-to-bigger-megalodon-size/ BIGGER Megs !!!! New ways to measure Megalodon Teeth...
  22. Taiwan's largest museum devoted only to fossils is located at the southern part of the island, near the city of Tainan at the Zuojhen Fossil Park. Most travelers will start their journey in the capital city of Taipei, but Tainan is only a <2 hour bullet train ride away (the bullet train, or high speed rail, is a destination in of itself- a marvel of speed, comfort and efficiency) and a visit to the Zuojhen Fossil Park is highly recommended. For western audiences, fossil park may be a bit misleading. Its not a park as in playgrounds and grassy fields, more like an industrial park, or complex
  23. Haven't had time to post here lately, but I carved out a slot so here we go. In April of last year (2019), I had a chance to visit China. When I was in Beijing, one of my goals was to see the feathered dinos. I visited two museums that had them. One was the Geological Museum of China. The other (The Beijing Museum of Natural History) will be the subject of another post. I took hundreds of pictures there, but I can't post them all here. I have selected some of the better ones, focusing on the feathered critters. You'll have to excuse the lighting and quality
  24. My wife and I recently traveled to Fairbanks, Alaska for a mini vacation and toured the Museum of the North on the University of Alaska, Fairbanks campus. It brought back some old memories as I completed my undergraduate training there in 1986. Here are a few pictures from the displays that I found interesting. The hadrosaurs display is fairly new and in the entryway Mammoth display Dinosaur interpretive displaysRay Troll art. Enjoy! AK Hiker
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