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Found 468 results

  1. Crosswicks Creek Find

    From the album Jerry's Really Old Stuff

    Three inch section of dinosaur bone found in ravine adjoining Crosswicks Creek, Burlington County, New Jersey. Nice find, probably hadrasaur, which now resides in the basement of the NJ State Museum.

    © More Crosswick Creek Stuff

  2. A Heart Breaker

    From the album Jerry's Really Old Stuff

    I took this picture at a thrift store where fishermen working on the clam and scallop trawlers out of Cape May NJ occasionally bring fossils to sell. This is a rare fossil section of caribou antler found off shore. I hesitate buying the rare fossil and when I came to my senses it had been sold when I returned. Caribou fossils are exceptionally rare in this area, very few examples having been found. The thrift store regularly had mastodon teeth and I've bought two and unwisely left other ice age bones....
  3. Sayreville Clay Mine Amber

    From the album Jerry's Really Old Stuff

    A piece of fossil amber embedded in a pyrite nodule found at Sayre and Fisher clay mine Sayreville, NJ. Quantities of Cretaceous era fossil amber have been found at the Sayreville site, some containing insect and plant inclusions. The American Museum of Natural History in NYC has a collection of amber from this site. Amber was and still is to a lesser extent found in lignite (carbonized wood) concentrations in a generally sterile compacted gray clay. Though dinosaur remains have not been found at the site the longest series of dinosaur tracts found in New Jersey were uncovered by workers during the mid 1930s.
  4. Mastodon Front Molar

    From the album Jerry's Really Old Stuff

    This molar was dredged from the Atlantic Ocean east of Atlantic City, NJ in 2013. It is a particularly large example measuring 8 inches in length. The average length for an adult mastodon is approximatly 6 inches.
  5. Concretion? Exogyra?

    These are two of three "fossils" I found on my trip to Big Brook in New Jersey last week, the stream runs through sediments that date back to the late Cretaceous.(the third one I will post later today hopefully). After having been really excited about this find, and then having done a decent amount of research I think I am safe in assuming that this is just concretion, or a psuedofossil if I am using those terms correctly. Even though this is the conclusion I have come to, this is my first fossil hunting trip and I would love some second opinions to either confirm my theories or offer some new insight. This one is about three inches long, and two inches thick. These two images are what I believe to be extinct clams, Exogyra. It doesn't seem like it is the shells, but just a fossil of the clam itself (if that makes sense). Again, I would love to hear what anyone in the community has to say.
  6. Hello all! Recently, I had the chance to meet up with a few forum members, and hunt the historic Granton Quarry, in North Bergen NJ. Last Monday, March 31st, I was up at the crack of dawn, 4:00 am, to hit the road and meet my partner for today, forum member Jeffrey P, in Newburgh, NY. I left my house in central Connecticut at 4:15 am, eager to be on the road, and heading towards the Triassic exposures of the Lockatong formation. An hour and a half later, after encountering heavy downpours and sporadic showers, I arrived at the appointed meeting place, a McDonalds parking lot, just off of Interstate 84. Meeting time was 6:00 am, and I arrived around 5:45am. Overly anxious? Not me. I was a little concerned about the weather, as ice pellets were beginning to hit my windshield as I waited for Jeff to arrive. Oh boy. Jeff showed up just after 6:00am, and after our initial greetings, and moving his gear to my truck, we got on our way. Jeffrey and I had collected together before, at my fossil fish site in Connecticut, so the trip down to North Bergen was a fun time talking over our expected strategies for this site, and how different this site was from my usual stomping grounds. We hit a bit of traffic heading into North Bergen, and arrived at our destination, around 7:20 am. Now, … Jeffrey had made two previous scouting expeditions to the site, and had a hunch on where we might find some productive layers of fossils. He had scored some clam shrimp and even had a very nice and possibly complete Diplurus newarki, a Triassic coelacanth! We were both hopeful, but realistic as the Newark Supergroup is notoriously hit or miss. For those unfamiliar with the area, the old Granton Quarry is gone, and on top of what was the main quarry floor, a Lowes Home Improvement Center now resides. There are still exposures of the Lockatong accessible to the north of the actual building., however. This exposure was our target. We stopped in to the Lowes, and met with the manager, Ray, who was perfectly willing to allow us to collect from the exposures on their property, so long as we stayed out of the way of any pending deliveries. We assured him we would be as unobtrusive as possible, and having received permission to hunt the exposure,, headed back to the car to get our gear. At this point, the other half of our collecting team arrived. John (Flyguy784) and his buddy Ken. I have been friendly with John since I joined the Forum back in 2010, and we have conversed fairly regularly, having bonded over our mutual frustration over hunting the Newark Supergroup. John is more of a plant guy, but we had talked in the past of a Granton trip, and when I mentioned to him that I was planning on going, he wanted to come up, if only just to get a chance to collect together. Meeting him, and putting a face to the name was a most welcome part of this trip, and we happily exchanged some fossils between us. It was now around 7:55, and we decided to gear up, and check some of the lower exposures, to see what could be found. The sky was gloomy looking, a light drizzle was falling, and the wind was blowing cold – a gray and fairly miserable start. Water was streaming off of the rocks above, in little runnels which felt great, sliding down your back. In the past, the Granton Quarry has yielded assorted fish, reptile/dino footprints, a little plant material, and some reptile material, including phytosaur teeth and coprolites, a gliding lizard (Icarosaurus) aquatic lizards, (Tanytrachelos) . We all had high hopes, but they were realistically tempered by our various experiences with hunting similar Newark Supergroup sites in the past. We collected the in the black and gray shales infrequently finding bits and pieces of both clam shrimp, and coprolites. Things continued in this vein for a few hours. We finally started to find assorted disarticulated bones of the coelacanth Diplurus newarki! Eureka! By this time, the rain had stopped, the sun came out, and the temperature was rising, steadily. At this point, we narrowed down the hunting to the lower few inches of a seam of black shale, the lower 2 inches of which were extremely friable, and nearly impossible to get out of the wall in any decently sized slabs. After finding a number of cool coelacanth bits, coprolites, and Estheria ovata clam shrimp slabs, between us, we decided around noon-thirty-ish to take a break for lunch, and retired to our cars in the Lowes lot. We snacked, talked fossils, and other various sundry things. An enjoyable time to be sure. We soaked up the sun, and enjoyed it’s warmth on our faces. At least my feet were no longer numb from the earlier cold! My companions were all amiable, and we enjoyed the time together. This is the type of outing that can be enjoyed, whether finding anything, or not. But, we were finding things, so we got back too it. We then decided to take the folding ladder I had brought, and try to access the higher layers of black shale which Jeffrey had managed to climb up to on a previous excursion, and remove a bit of shale that had yielded his Diplurus coelacanth. We set the ladder up, and took turns removing shale, and bracing the ladder for each other. When we got tired of removing rock, we stopped, took a break to split what we had removed, and then switched places. This garnered us some larger slabs, that, while they didn’t provide us with any complete fish, did reward us with some mortality plates of the Estheria ovata, and some more bits and pieces of Diplurus newarki. We continued in this way, while John and Ken scouted some of the lower seams of black shale. Time, as is always the case, flew away from us, and before we knew it, 4:00PM was approaching, and we needed to leave by then to make it home at a reasonable time. We packed up our things, said our goodbyes, and got on our way. Traffic leaving Jersey was smoother than coming in, so we were back to the McDonalds in Newburgh just around 5:00 PM. Jeff and I said goodbye, and went our separate ways. I headed home, to be stymied getting to the Beacon Bridge, for about a half an hour …just to get 3.5 miles or so. I finally arrived home to Connecticut at around 7:30 pm, excited by my finds and a successful hunt in the Lockatong Formation – The Newark Supergroup had blessed me with a few Upper Triassic finds for my collection. Thanks for looking – enjoy the pics. Regards, John (Flyguy 784- background) and JeffreyP (foreground) One area we tried to attack Continued...
  7. It was the day before Christmas and I felt the need for a change from usual precoccupation with Devonian inverts to go south to Jersey and sift the Ram for Cretaceous fossils. I "discovered" Monmouth County last year on a NYPS collecting trip to Big Brook which was one of my first collecting trips. Last March I found Ramanessin Brook which has since become my favorite Monmouth County collecting area. I've been there a half dozen times and while it's been many long hours of sifting the collection of Cretaceous fossils, especially shark teeth, has slowly grown. Temperatures had recently risen and with two days of rain and melting snow and I was hoping would have kicked up a few specimens. Traffic was flowing well and I made it there in record time; under two hours, arriving just before 9 AM. Temperature was in the high thirties. I came prepared, all of the usual warm weather gear including a rain suit and hip waders, and a thermos of hot tea. I arrived at one of my two favorite collecting spots. I immediately scanned the gravel bar and found part of a ghost shrimp claw and a couple small shark teeth. I commensed sifting the stream and the first hour turned up a lot of broken teeth I ended up throwing back and just one small crow shark tooth I ended up keeping. I began fretting this might be a long trip for nothing when I found the largest, most perfect goblin shark tooth, an inch and a half tall. After that it was one find after another; more goblins, three mackerals, and eight complete crow shark teeth, plus a couple ammonite sections, partial enchodus teeth, and a partial brachiopod. Then there was one large mystery tooth. Here's a photo of the collection: About the mystery tooth, it is the one in the lower right hand corner. It is three quarters of an inch long. I think it might be a crocodile or mosasaur or possibly a peudo fossil. TFF members please share your expertise. Also will likely send a phot to Jason Schein at the NJ State Museum who has helped ID my finds in the past. Sorry the photos aren't better. Staying warm is always an issue on these type trips. Can't use gloves and so keeping the hands warm is the toughest part. Had to give them a "rest" every now and then, put on gloves, drink some tea, etc. Ended up spending seven hours. The trip home though was the big adventure. Ran into an unexpected ice storm on the way and the last ten miles took over an hour and a half, but I'm home now, safe and able to enjoy a merry Christmas. Happy holidays to the rest of you!
  8. Hi all! After a nice summer of collecting, the more puzzling task of idenitifying my new fossils is where I find myself. I found this tooth using a mesh screen in the gravel bars in the stream about 100 yards downstream of the main parking area. It doesn't seem to match the photos of the different shark teeth varieties that are found in Big Brook and NJ on the following websites: http://www.njfossils.net/shark.html http://www.fossilsofnj.com/ http://www.fossilguy.com/sites/bbrook/bbrook_col.htm These sites have been my go-to for trying to id my fossils in NJ. Anyone have any ideas about what type of tooth this is? Thanks, Greg
  9. Here's some stuff I collected on 4 trips this summer to a site of mine in the late Campanian Wenonah formation of NJ. A few friends from the forum also were there for some of those digs. Perhaps they will share some of their finds as well.
  10. Hello, This is a two part question. First, does Shark River Park still produce nice fossils, like mosasaur teeth or great white teeth? Has anyone been having any luck there still?
  11. I found these in the latest Maastrichtian, uppermost New Egypt fm. of NJ. Both pieces were basically found together which leads me to believe they are somehow related. I have never found anything else like it although I could have easily missed other similar objects since they are small and somewhat nondescript. The preservation reminds me of invert steinkerns found in the same layer. I thought these might possibly be pieces of some larger invert, but I have no idea what. And they really do look like 2 discrete structures instead of pieces of something larger. The local ammonite/invert expert of the Atlantic Coastal Plain, Ralph Johnson, was stumped as well, but suggested that they might be rhyncholites. I can definitely see a little resemblance to rhyncholites, but I would like to hear any and all opinions. Eutrophoceras is fairly common in this formation so it would make sense that these might be from a nautiloid. But please share any ideas and opinions on these that you might have! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g4JZWcsHflY
  12. I've been over here on the east coast for work since Sandy hit, and since I don't have any place to go for Thanksgiving, I think I'll drive up and give Big Brook a try. If anybody wants to join me, I guess I'll be trying the Boundry Ave spot. If anybody has any advice for a first time Big Brook hunter, I'd be happy to take it. I'm more of a crawl and scan person than a sifter, so I think that's what I'll be trying. (Most excited about finding some belemnites hopefully, but I'll take shark teeth as well) Ramo
  13. Hello, I've always heard that it is best to hit the Monmouth County sites after a storm. Just started collecting this year, and I've just gone the few times my schedule has allowed. Question is how long does it typically take for the creeks to reach safe levels after a storm (knowing that every storm is different including the nasty one bearing down on us)? I wouldn't want to take a day off work just to face 5ft of raging current. Thanks!
  14. Big Brook

    These were pulled from a few relatively short visits to Big Brook. Maybe 6 hours total in the water. Posting just to show what someone who really has no clue what he's doing could expect to pull out as I've seen a few posts with questions regarding this site. Entered from Hillsdale with a garden shovel and a colander (vegetable rinser) without an idea as to what a 'hot spot' versus dry spot would be. Can't say I've figured a ton out in these few trips, but getting a bit more efficient. Pic 1: Some random sharks teeth. I love the diversity in coloration that comes out. Pic 2: Nice little brachiopod mold that is in really nice shape in a very light color. I'm sure the small size may hide some flaws that would be more apparent in a larger example. Only one I've found. Pic 3: My favorite tooth due to color and the tiny, needle sharp little 'side tooth'...not sure what the official name of this is. Pic 4: Fish teeth. Look like Salmonoid from pics on njfossils.net
  15. Big Brook Bone

    can somebody be kind enough to id this bone? Im guessing cow, deer, caribou of some sort maybe. just want to make sure. found it in the stream.
  16. Hey Guys, I know its a fossil forum but I feel native american artifacts go hand in hand so dont blow a fuse. I have found arrowheads here and there. not as many as I would like to admit. I dont know if I am looking in the wrong places or what. I know the basics, plowed feilds after a rain, creeks bed, ect. Are there any particular places I should be looking, any geological characteristics, bluffs, ect. Should i be looking in creeks or is that more of a waste of time than anything else. If i were to survery a certain area, how far should i dig while sifting the land. I want to know everything there is to know when it comes to native american finds in new jersey with maximum productivity. I would really appreciate any help, knowledge, and advice that would help me out. Also have a question in regard to tips. Is it possible that archaic and paleo indians may have made spears out of iron stone? I know that it is everywhere in Parts of new jersey but i have found a piece that seems to have been worked. it doesnt have conchoidal fractures since its not chert but it is pointed, it was not from a river bed, it was from a turned field, and it has definately been worked. thanks for the information!
  17. That Ain't Amber, But Maybe A Fossil?

    Hi -- I look my young son to the clay beds in Sayreville, NJ this weekend to look for amber (or, most hopefully, something in amber). We left with just a few pebbles. But in some gravel at the site, he pulled out what he was *convinced* was a shark tooth. While I initially dismissed it as a rock, my son -- who at 7 is pretty up on his game -- made a convincing case for further analysis. There's an enamel-like substance on the "top" side, with a smooth, rounded back, and there appears to be dark fossil remains where the "root" would have been. I haven't tried to clean the clay off of it, (nor am I sure its possible, or even if its clay and not, you know, just a rock). Here are the pics: I don't know where Sayreville, NJ would fit in NJ fossil hunting eras. We usually do the Big Brook/Ramunessen Creek thing here in NJ, and are used to some late Cretaceous finds. And though I know the Sayreville site was a quarry and has a history of some fossils, I was under the impression it was primarily plant, shells and imprints found there. Oh, and rocks. Anyway -- thanks for any help with this!
  18. These are a few of the pdf files (and a few Microsoft Word documents) that I've accumulated in my web browsing. MOST of these are hyperlinked to their source. If you want one that is not hyperlinked or if the link isn't working, e-mail me at joegallo1954@gmail.com and I'll be happy to send it to you. Please note that this list will be updated continuously as I find more available resources. All of these files are freely available on the Internet so there should be no copyright issues. Articles with author names in RED are new additions since April 24, 2018. United States Faunas, Localities and Stratigraphy (by State) Maine Allen, J.P. and R.A. Gastaldo (2006). Sedimentology and taphonomy of the Early to Middle Devonian plant-bearing beds of the Trout Valley Formation, Maine. Geological Society of America, Special Paper 399. Dougherty, P., et al. (2014). Conserving Maine's Fossil Heritage: The Trout Valley Formation along Wadleigh Mountain Road, Scientific Forest Management Area. Report to the Baxter Park Authority. Kasper, A.E., et al. (1988). Plant Paleontology in the State of Maine - A Review. Maine Geological Survey, Studies in Maine Geology: Vol.1. Maine Geological Survey. Virtual Tour of Maine's Fossils. Neuman, R.B. and H.B. Whittington (1964). Fossils in Ordovician Tuffs, Northeastern Maine. U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1181-E. Pollock, S.G., D.A.T. Harper and D. Rohr (1994). Late Ordovician Nearshore Faunas and Depositional Environments, Northwestern Maine. J.Paleont., 68(5). Selover, R.W., R.A. Gastaldo, and R.E. Nelson (2005). An Estuarine Assemblage from the Middle Devonian Trout Valley Formation of Northern Maine. Palaios, Vol.20. Thompson, W.B., et al. (2011). Associated terrestrial and marine fossils in the late-glacial Presumpscot Formation, Southern Maine, USA, and the marine reservoir effect on radiocarbon ages. Quaternary Research, 75. Tucker, R.D. and R.G. Marvinney (1988). Studies in Maine Geology. Volume 1: Structure and Stratigraphy. Maine Geological Survey. Williams, H.S. (1913). New Species of Silurian Fossils from the Edmunds and Pembroke Formations of Washington County, Maine. Proceedings U.S. National Museum, Vol.45, Number 1985. Maryland American Geophysical Union (1989). Tertiary Stratigraphy and Paleontology, Chesapeake Bay Region, Virginia and Maryland. Field Trip Guidebook T216, 28th International Geological Congress. Kidwell, S.M. (1997). Anatomy of Extremely Thin Marine Sequences Landward of a Passive-Margin Hinge Zone: Neogene Calvert Cliffs Succession, Maryland, U.S.A. Journal of Sedimentary Research, Vol.67, Number 2. Kidwell, S.M., et al. (2015). Miocene stratigraphy and paleoenvironments of the Calvert Cliffs, Maryland. The Geological Society of America, Field Guide 40. (Thanks to doushantuo for pointing this one out!) Kuizon, L. (2008). Geology and Paleontology of the Bureau of Land Management Douglas Point Special Recreation Management Area, Charles County, Maryland. BLM Lower Potomac Field Station. Mansfield, W.C. (1927). Some Peculiar Fossil Forms from Maryland. Proceedings U.S. National Museum - 2688, Vol.71, Article 16. Maryland Geological Survey (1923). Silurian. Maryland Geological Survey - Systematic Reports, The Johns Hopkins Press, Baltimore. (872 pages) Maryland Geological Survey (1923). Lower Devonian (Text). Maryland Geological Survey - Systematic Reports, The Johns Hopkins Press, Baltimore. (596 pages) Maryland Geological Survey (1919). Cambrian and Ordovician . Maryland Geological Survey - Systematic Reports, The Johns Hopkins Press, Baltimore. (511 pages) Maryland Geological Survey (1916). Upper Cretaceous (Text). Maryland Geological Survey - Systematic Reports, The Johns Hopkins Press, Baltimore. (593 pages) Maryland Geological Survey (1916). Upper Cretaceous (Text and Plates). Maryland Geological Survey - Systematic Reports, The Johns Hopkins Press, Baltimore. (540 pages) Maryland Geological Survey (1913). Middle Devonian (Text). Maryland Geological Survey - Systematic Reports, The Johns Hopkins Press, Baltimore. (733 pages) Maryland Geological Survey (1913). Devonian (Plates). Maryland Geological Survey - Systematic Reports, The Johns Hopkins Press, Baltimore. (318 pages) Maryland Geological Survey (1911). Lower Cretaceous. Maryland Geological Survey - Systematic Reports, The Johns Hopkins Press, Baltimore. (731 pages) Maryland Geological Survey (1907). Calvert County. Maryland Geological Survey - Systematic Reports, The Johns Hopkins Press, Baltimore. (271 pages) Maryland Geological Survey (1906). Pliocene and Pleistocene. Maryland Geological Survey - Systematic Reports, The Johns Hopkins Press, Baltimore. (395 pages) Maryland Geological Survey (1904). Miocene (Text). Maryland Geological Survey - Systematic Reports, The Johns Hopkins Press, Baltimore. (722 pages) Maryland Geological Survey (1904). Miocene (Plates). Maryland Geological Survey - Systematic Reports, The Johns Hopkins Press, Baltimore. (262 pages) Maryland Geological Survey (1901). Eocene. Maryland Geological Survey - Systematic Reports, The Johns Hopkins Press, Baltimore. (410 pages) Minard, J.P., et al. (1969). Cretaceous-Tertiary Boundary in New Jersey, Delaware, and Eastern Maryland. United States Geological Survey, Bulletin 1274-H. Read, C.B. (1955). Floras of the Pocono Formation and Price Sandstone in Parts of Pennsylvania, Maryland, West Virginia, and Virginia. U.S. Geological Society Professional Paper 263. Weems, R.E. and R.A. George (2013). Amphibians and Nonmarine Turtles from the Miocene Calvert Formation of Delaware, Maryland and Virginia (USA). Journal of Paleontology, 87(4). Massachusetts Argus, G.W. and M.B. Davis (1962). Macrofossils from a Late-Glacial Deposit at Cambridge, Massachusetts. The American Midland Naturalist, 67(1). Collette, J.H., P.R. 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Microfossil fauna from the Blue Earth Siltstone of the Lower Ordovician Prairie du Chien Group, Minnesota, USA. Senior Integrative Exercise - Carleton College. Mississippi Cicimurri, D.J., C.N. Ciampaglio and K.E. Runyon (2014). Late Cretaceous Elasmobranchs from the Eutaw Formation at Luxapalila Creek, Lowndes County, Mississippi. PalArch's Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 11,2. Crider, A.F. (1906). Geology and Mineral Resources of Mississippi. United States Geological Survey, Bulletin Number 283. Daley, E. (1992). A List, Bibliography and Index of the Fossil Vertebrates of Mississippi. Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality - Office of Geology, Bulletin 128. Danehy, D.R., P. Wilf and S.A. Little (2007). An Early Eocene Macroflora from the Red Hot Truck Stop Locality (Meridian, Mississippi, USA). Palaeontologia Electronica, Vol.10, Issue 3. Dockery, D.T. (1997). Windows into Mississippi's Geologic Past. 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The Middle-Cambrian Biostratigraphy of Montana and Wyoming. Ph.D. Dissertation - State University of New York at Stony Brook. (92.9MB download) Thomas, R.C. (2007). A Field Guide to the Cambrian Section at Camp Creek, Southwest Montana. Northwest Geology, Vol.36. Montana - Carboniferous Easton, W.H. (1962). Carboniferous Formations and Faunas of Central Montana. United States Geological Survey, Professional Paper 348. Hagadorn, J.W. Bear Gulch: An Exceptional Upper Carboniferous Plattenkalk. Montana - Devonian Fiorillo, A.R. (2000). The Ancient Environment of the Beartooth Butte Formation (Devonian) in Wyoming and Montana: Combining Paleontological Inquiry with Federal Management Needs. In: Wilderness science in a time of change conference - Vol.3: Wilderness as a place for scientific inquiry. USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRS-P-15-Vol.3. Montana - Cretaceous Brinkman, D.B., M.G. Newbry and A.G. Neuman (2014). Diversity and paleoecology of actinopterygian fish from vertebrate microfossil localities of the Maastrichtian Hell Creek Formation of Montana. The Geological Society of America, Special Paper 503. Brown, B. (1907). The Hell Creek Beds of the Upper Cretaceous of Montana. Bulletin American Museum of Natural History, Vol.XXIII, Article XXXIII. Coryell, H.N. and E.S. Salmon (1934). A Molluscan Faunule from the Pierre Formation in Eastern Montana. American Museum Novitates, Number 746. Davis, B.M., R.L. Cifelli and J.E. Cohen (2016). First Fossil Mammals from the Upper Cretaceous Eagle Formation (Santonian, Northern Montana, USA), and Mammal Diversity During the Aquilan North American Land Mammal Age. Palaeontologia Polonica, 67. Flight, J.N. (2004). Sequence Stratigraphic Analysis of the Fox Hills and Hell Creek Formations (Maastrichtian), Eastern Montana and its Relationship to Dinosaur Paleontology. Masters Thesis, Montana State University. Hartman, J.H., et al. (2014). Context, naming and formal designation of the Cretaceous Hell Creek Formation lectostratotype, Garfield County, Montana. The Geological Society of America, Special Paper 503. Johnson, K.R. (1996). Description of Seven Common Fossil Leaf Species from the Hell Creek Formation (Upper Cretaceous: Upper Maastrichtian), North Dakota, South Dakota and Montana. Proceedings of the Denver Museum of Natural History, Series 3, Number 12. Johnson, K.R., D.J. Nichols and J.H. Hartman (2002). Hell Creek Formation: A 2001 synthesis. The Geological Society of America, Special Paper 361. (Thanks to troodon for pointing this one out!) Lash, C.E. (2011). Depositional Environment and Taphonomy of Marine Vertebrate Biofacies in the Lower Cretaceous (Albian) Thermopolis Shale, South-Central Montana. Masters Thesis - Montana State University. Moran, S.M. (2011). The Taphonomy, Paleoecology and Depositional Environment of Vertebrate Microfossil Bonebeds from the Late Cretaceous Hell Creek Formation in Garfield County, Montana. B.S. Thesis - The College of William and Mary. Ostrom, J.H. (1970). Stratigraphy and Paleontology of the Cloverly Formation (Lower Cretaceous) of the Bighorn Basin Area, Wyoming and Montana. Bulletin of the Peabody Museum of Natural History, Bull. 55. Rogers, R.R. and M.E. Brady (2010). Origins of microfossil bonebeds: insights from the Upper Cretaceous Judith River Formation of north-central Montana. Paleobiology, 36(1). Rogers, R.R., et al. (2016). Age, Correlation, and Lithostratigraphic Revision of the Upper Cretaceous (Campanian) Judith River Formation in Its Type Area (North-Central Montana), with a Comparison of Low- and Hgh-Accomodation Alluvial Records. The Journal of Geology, , Vol.124. Sahni, A. (1972). The Vertebrate Fauna of the Judith River Formation, Montana. 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Mammals from the end of the age of dinosaurs in North Dakota and southeastern Montana, with a reappraisal of geographic differentiation among Lancian mammals. Geological Society of America, Special Paper 361. Montana - Paleocene Hartman, J.H. and A.J. Kihm (1995). Age of Meek and Hayden's Fort Union Group (Paleocene), Upper Missouri River, North Dakota-Montana. Seventh Annual Williston Basin Symposium. Hartman, J.H., et al. (1989). Paleontology, Stratigraphy, and Sedimentology of Simpson Quarry (Early Paleocene), Crazy Mountains Basin, South-Central Montana. 1989 MGS Field Conference, Montana Centennial. Krause, D.W. and P.D. Gingerich (1983). Mammalian Fauna from Douglass Quarry, Earliest Tiffanian (Late Paleocene) of the Eastern Crazy Mountain Basin, Montana. Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology - The University of Michigan, Vol.26, Number 9. Simpson, G.G. (1937). Additions to the Upper Paleocene Fauna of the Crazy Mountain Field. American Museum Novitates, Number 940. 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A New Hemphillian (Late Miocene) Mammalian Fauna from Hoye Canyon, West Central Nevada.Contributions in Science, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, Number 481. Kelly, T.S. (1997). Additional Late Cenozoic (latest Hemphillian to earliest Irvingtonian) mammals from Douglas County, Nevada. PaleoBios, 18(1). Kelly, T.S. (1994). Two Pliocene (Blancan) Vertebrate Faunas from Douglas County, Nevada. PaleoBios, 16(1). Kelly, T.S. and R. Secord (2009). Biostratigraphy of the Hunter Creek Sandstone, Verdi Basin, Washoe County, Nevada. The Geological Society of America, Special Paper 447. Ketner, K.B. and B.R. Wardlaw (1981). Permian and Triassic rocks near Quinn River Crossing, Humboldt County, Nevada. Geology, Vol.9. LaPointe, D.D. and J. Price (2001). Fossils and Ancient Lakes. A Field Trip for Families and Rockhounds. Earth Science Week 2001 Field Trip #2, Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology. Lucas, S.G. and M.J. Orchard (2007). Triassic Lithostratigraphy and Biostratigraphy North of Currie, Elko County, Nevada. In: Triassic of the American West. Lucas, S.G. and J.A. Spielmann (eds.), New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin 40. Lucas, S.G., et al. (2007). First Day: Middle Triassic Stratigraphy and Ammonite Biostratigraphy in Western Nevada: Fossil Hill to Favret Canyon. In: Triassic of the American West. Lucas, S.G. and J.A. Spielmann (eds.), New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin 40. McCollum, L.B. and D.M. Miller (1991). Cambrian Stratigraphy of the Wendover Area, Utah and Nevada. U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 1948. Ross, R.J. (1972). Fossils from the Ordovician Bioherm at Meikeljohn Peak, Nevada. U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 685. Ross, R.J. and F.C. Shaw (1972). Distribution of the Middle Ordovician Copenhagen Formation and its Trilobites in Nevada. U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 749. Simpson, G.G. (1933). A Nevada Fauna of Pleistocene Type and its Probable Association with Man. American Museum Novitates, Number 667., Smith, E.F., et al. (2016). The end of the Ediacaran: Two new exceptionally preserved body fossil assemblages from Mount Dunfee, Nevada, USA. Geology, Vol.44, Number 11. Smith, K., N. Czaplewski and R.L. Cifelli (2016). Middle Miocene carnivorans from the Monarch Hill Formation, Nevada. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 61(1). Waggoner, B. and J.W. Hagadorn. New Fossils from the Terminal Neoproterozoic Strata of Southern Nye County, Nevada. Walcott, C.D. (1884). Paleontology of the Eureka District. Monographs of the United States Geological Survey, Vol.VIII. (440 pages) Webster, M., R.R. Gaines and N.C. Hughes (2008). Microstratigraphy, trilobite biostratinomy, and depositional environment of the "Lower Cambrian" Ruin Wash Lagerstatte, Pioche Formation, Nevada. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 264. New Hampshire Boucot, A.J. and R. Arndt (1960). Fossils of the Littleton Formation (Lower Devonian) of New Hampshire. Geological Survey Professional Paper 334-B. New Jersey Fowler, H.W. (1911). A Description of the Fossil Fish Remains of the Cretaceous, Eocene and Miocene Formations of New Jersey. Geological Survey of New Jersey. (238 Pages, 10.83 MB download). Grimaldi, D., C.W. Beck and J.J. Boon (1989). Occurrence, Chemical Characteristics and Paleontology of the Fossil Resins from New Jersey. American Museum Novitates, Number 2948. Krinsley, D. and M. Schneck (1964). The Palaeoecology of a Transition Zone Across an Upper Cretaceous Boundary in New Jersey. Palaeontology, Vol.7, Part 2. Lacovara, K.J. and W.B. Gallagher (2006). From the K/T to the Beach: the Coastal Deposits of Southern New Jersey. In: Geological Society of America Field Trip Guide for Annual Meeting 2006, Philadelphia. Science Notes 18. Minard, J.P., et al. (1969). Cretaceous-Tertiary Boundary in New Jersey, Delaware, and Eastern Maryland. United States Geological Survey, Bulletin 1274-H. Newberry, J.S. (1888). Fossil Fishes and Fossil Plants of the Triassic Rocks of New Jersey and the Connecticut Valley. Monographs of the United States Geological Survey, Vol.XIV. Olsen, P.E. (1980). Fossil Great Lakes of the Newark Supergroup in New Jersey. In: Field Studies in New Jersey Geology and Guide to Field Trips. Manspeizer, W. (ed.), 52nd Ann.Mtg. New York State Geology Association, Rutgers University. Olsen, P.E. (1980). A Comparison of the Vertebrate Assemblages from the Newark and Hartford Basins (Early Mesozoic, Newark Supergroup) of Eastern North America. In: Aspects of Vertebrate History: Essays in Honor of Edwin Harris Colbert. Jacobs, L.L. (ed.), Museum of Northern Arizona Press. Olsen, P.E. and J.J. Flynn (1989). Field Guide to the Vertebrate Paleontology of Late Triassic Age Rocks in the Southwestern Newark Basin (Newark Supergroup, New Jersey and Pennsylvania). The Mosasaur, Vol.4. Parris, D.C. (1983). New and Revised Records of Pleistocene Mammals of New Jersey. The Mosasaur, Vol.1. Richards, H.G., et al. (1991 reprint). The Cretaceous Fossils of New Jersey, Part I: Porifera, Coelenterata, Annelida, Echinoidea, Brachiopoda, and Pelecypoda.New Jersey Geological Survey. Richards, H.G., et al. (1991 reprint). The Cretaceous Fossils of New Jersey, Part II: Gastropoda, Scaphipoda, Nautiloidea, Ammonoidea, Belemnitidae, Crustacea, Vertebrata and Miscellaneous Fossils. New Jersey Geological Survey, Bulletin 61. Stanford, S.D. and R.W. Witte, Leaders (1997). Pliocene-Quaternary Geology of Northern New Jersey.60th Annual Reunion of the Northeastern Friends of the Pleistocene. Weller, S. (1907). A Report on the Cretaceous Paleontology of New Jersey Based upon the Stratigraphic Studies of George N. Knapp (Text). Geological Survey of New Jersey. (897 pages) Weller, S. (1907). A Report on the Cretaceous Paleontology of New Jersey Based upon the Stratigraphic Studies of George N. Knapp. (Plates only). Geological Survey of New Jersey. Weller, S. (1903). Report on Paleontology. Vol. III. The Paleozoic Faunas. Geological Survey of New Jersey. (520 pages, 14.8 MB download) Whitfield, R.P. (1894). Mollusca and Crustacea of the Miocene Formations of New Jersey. Monographs of the United States Geological Survey, Vol.XXIV. (264 pages, 11.8 MB download) Whitfield, R.P. (1880). Brachiopoda and Lamellibranchiata of the Raritan Clays and Greensand Marls of New Jersey. Geological Survey of New Jersey. (348 pages, 17.07 MB download) New Mexico New Mexico - Cambrian Taylor, J.F., et al. (2004). Paleoceanographic events and faunal crises recorded in the Upper Cambrian and Lower Ordovician of west Texas and southern New Mexico. Geological Society of America, Field Guide 5. New Mexico - Ordovician Taylor, J.F., et al. (2004). Paleoceanographic events and faunal crises recorded in the Upper Cambrian and Lower Ordovician of west Texas and southern New Mexico. Geological Society of America, Field Guide 5. New Mexico - Carboniferous DuChene, H.R. (1974). Pennsylvanian Rocks of North-Central New Mexico. New Mexico Geol. Soc. Guidebook, 25th Field Conference, Ghost Ranch (Central-Northern NM). Ivanov, A., S.G. Lucas and K. Krainer (2009). Pennsylvanian Fishes from the Sandia Formation, Socorro County, New Mexico. New Mexico Geological Society Guidebook, 60th Field Conference, Geology of the Chupadera Mesa Region. Kues, B.S. (2004). Marine invertebrate assemblages from the Late Pennsylvanian (Virgilian) Holder Formation, Dry Canyon, Sacramento Mountains, south-central New Mexico.New Mexico Geology, Vol.26, Number 2. Kues, B.S. (1996). Guide to the late Pennsylvanian paleontology of the Upper Madera Formation, Jemez Springs area, north-central New Mexico. In: Jemez Mountains Region. Goff, F., et al. (eds.), New Mexico Geological Society 47th Annual Fall Field Conference Guidebook. Kues, B.S. (1984). Pennsylvanian Stratigraphy and Paleontology of the Taos Area, North-Central New Mexico. New Mexico Geological Society Guidebook, 35th Field Conference, Rio Grande Rift: Northern New Mexico. Northrop, S.A. Mississippian and Pennsylvanian Fossils of the Albuquerque County. New Mexico Geological Society, Twelfth Field Conference. Otte, C. (1959). Late Pennsylvanian and Early Permian Stratigraphy of the Northern Sacramento Mountains, New Mexico. New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources, Bulletin 50. New Mexico - Permian Lucas, S.G., et al. (2014). The Lower Permian Abo Formation in the Northern Sacramento Mountains, Southern New Mexico. In: Geology of the Sacramento Mountains Region. New Mexico Geological Society Guidebook, 65th Field Conference. Otte, C. (1959). Late Pennsylvanian and Early Permian Stratigraphy of the Northern Sacramento Mountains, New Mexico. New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources, Bulletin 50. Vaughn, P.P. (1969). Early Permian Vertebrates from Southern New Mexico and Their Paleozoogeographic Significance. Los Angeles County Museum Contributions in Science, Number 166. Weidlich, O. and J.A. Fagerstrom (1998). Evolution of the Upper Capitan-Massive (Permian) Guadalupe Mountains, New Mexico. In: Brigham Young University Geology Studies. B.J. Kowallis (ed.), Vol.43. (Thanks to DPS Ammonite for locating this one!) Wood, R., J.A.D. Dickson, and B.L. Kirkland (1996). New Observations on the Ecology of the Permian Capitan Reef, Texas and New Mexico. Palaeontology, Vol.39, Part 3. New Mexico - Triassic Carpenter, K. and M. Parrish (1985). Late Triassic Vertebrates from Revuelto Creek, Quay County, New Mexico. New Mexico Geological Society Guidebook, 36th Field Conference, Santa Rosa, 1985. Colbert, E.H. (1974). The Triassic Paleontology of Ghost Ranch. New Mexico Geol.Soc. Guidebook, 25th Field Conference, Ghost Ranch (Central-Northern N.M.) Gregory, J.P. (1972). Vertebrate Faunas of the Dockum Group, Triassic, Eastern New Mexico and West Texas. In: East-Central New Mexico. Kelley, V.C. and F.D. Trauger (eds.), New Mexico Geological Society 23rd Annual Fall Field Conference Guidebook. Heckert, A.B., et al. (2005). The Vertebrate Fauna of the Upper Triassic (Revueltian: Early-Mid Norian) Painted Desert Member (Petrified Forest Formation: Chinle Group) in the Chama Basin, Northern New Mexico. In: Geology of the Chama Basin. 56th Field Conference Guidebook, New Mexico Geological Society. Hunt, A.P. (2001). The vertebrate fauna, biostratigraphy and biochronology of the the type Revueltian land vertebrate faunachron, Bull Canyon Formation (Upper Triassic), east-central New Mexico. In: Geology of Llano Estacado. Lucas, S.G. and D. Ulmer-Scholle (eds.), New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science 52nd Annual Fall Field Conference Guidebook. Lucas, S.G. and S. Connealy (2008). Triassic New Mexico - Dawn of the Dinosaurs. New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science. Read on-line or download a copy. Lucas, S.G. and A.P. Hunt (1992). Triassic Stratigraphy and Paleontology, Chama Basin and Adjacent Areas, North Central New Mexico. New Mexico Geological Society Guidebook, 43rd Field Conference, San Juan Basin IV, 1992. Lucas, S.G., A.B. Heckert and O.J. Anderson (1997). Triassic stratigraphy and paleontology of the Fort Wingate quadrangle, west-central New Mexico. New Mexico Geology, Vol.19, Number 2. Lucas, S.G., et al. (2005). Review of Upper Triassic Stratigraphy and Biostratigraphy in the Chama Basin, Northern New Mexico. New Mexico Geological Society, 56th Field Conference Guidebook, Geology of the Chama Basin. Zeigler, K.E., A.B. Heckert and S.G. Lucas (2005). Taphonomic Analysis of a Fire-Related Upper Triassic Vertebrate Fossil Assemblage from North-Central New Mexico. In: Geology of the Chama Basin. New Mexico Geological Society, 56th Field Conference Guidebook. New Mexico - Jurassic Lucas, S.G., et al. (2001). Late Jurassic invertebrate fossils from the Little Hatchet Mountains, southwestern New Mexico. New Mexico Geology. New Mexico - Cretaceous Armstrong-Ziegler, J.G. (1980). Amphibia and Reptilia from the Campanian of New Mexico. Fieldiana Geology, New Series Number 4. Gilmore, C.W. (1916). Contributions to the Geology and Paleontology of San Juan County, New Mexico; 2. Vertebrate Faunas of the Ojo Alamo, Kirtland and Fruitland Formations. U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 98-Q. Greenwood, E., F.E. Kottlowski and A.K. Armstrong. Upper Paleozoic and Cretaceous Stratigraphy of the Hidalgo County Area, New Mexico. New Mexico Geological Society - Twenty-first Field Conference. Lozinsky, R.P., A.P. Hunt, and D.L. Wolberg (1984). Late Cretaceous (Lancian) dinosaurs from the McRae Formation, Sierra County, New Mexico. New Mexico Geology. Lucas, S.G. and T.F. Lawton (2005). Upper Cretaceous marine strata in the Little Hatchet Mountains, southwestern New Mexico. New Mexico Geology, Vol.27, Number 3. Lucas, S.G. and S.C. Johnson (2003). Cretaceous Invertebrate and Selachian Fossil Assemblage from the Juana Lopez Member of the Mancos Shale Near Herrera, West-Central New Mexico. New Mexico Geological Society Guidebook, 54th Field Conference, Geology of the Zuni Plateau. Lucas, S.G. and N.J. Mateer (1983). Vertebrate Paleoecology of the Late Campanian (Cretaceous) Fruitland Formation, San Juan Basin, New Mexico (USA). Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 28(1-2). Lucas, S.G., et al. (2010). Cretaceous stratigraphy, paleontology, petrography, depositional environments, and cycle stratigraphy at Cerro de Cristo Rey, Dona Ana County, New Mexico. New Mexico Geology, Vol.32, Number 4. Robison, C.R. and D.L. Wolberg (1982). New Late Cretaceous leaf locality from lower Kirtland Shale member, Bisti area, San Juan Basin, New Mexico. New Mexico Geology. Spielmann, J.A. and S.G. Lewis (2006). Late Cretaceous Marine Reptiles (Mosasauriidae and Plesiosauria) from New Mexico and their Biostratigraphic Distribution. In: Late Cretaceous vertebrates from the Western Interior . Lucas, S.G. and R.M.Sullivan (eds.) New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin 35. Spielmann, J.A., R. Pence and S.G. Lucas (2009). A Nearshore Vertebrate Assemblage from the Late Cretaceous (Turonian) Atarque Sandstone, Socorro County, New Mexico. New Mexico Geological Society Guidebook, 60th Field Conference, Geology of the Chupadera Mesa Region, 2009. New Mexico - K/T Boundary Keller, G., et al. (1994). Field Guide to Cretaceous-Tertiary Boundary Sections in Northeastern New Mexico. LPI Contribution Number 827, Lunar and Planetary Institute, Houston. New Mexico - Paleocene Davis, A.J., et al. (2016). Climate and landscape reconstruction of the Arroyo Chijuillita Member of the Nacimiento Formation, San Juan Basin, New Mexico: Providing environmental context to early Paleocene mammal evolution. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 463. Matthew, W.D. (1897). A Revision of the Puerco Fauna. Bulletin American Museum of Natural History, Vol.IX, Article XXII. Simpson, G.G. (1936). Additions to the Puerco Fauna, Lower Paleocene. American Museum Novitates, Number 849. Williamson, T.E. and S.G. Lucas (1992). Stratigraphy and Mammalian Biostratigraphy of the Paleocene Nacimiento Formation, Southern San Juan Basin, New Mexico. New Mexico Geological Society Guidebook, 43rd Field Conference, San Juan Basin IV, 1992. New Mexico - Eocene Lucas, S.G. (1983). The Baca Formation and the Eocene-Oligocene Boundary in New Mexico. New Mexico Geological Society Guidebook, 34th Field Conference, Socorro Region II. Lucas, S.G. (1977). Vertebrate Paleontology of the San Jose Formation, East-Central San Juan Basin, New Mexico. New Mexico Geological Society Guidebook, 28th Field Conference, San Juan Basin III. Lucas, S.G. and J.A. Spielmann (2012). Late Eocene (Chadronian) fossil mammals from the Palm Park Formation, Caballo Formation, Sierra County, New Mexico. In: Geology of the Warm Springs Region. Lucas, S.G., et al. (eds.), New Mexico Geological Society 63rd Annual Fall Field Conference Guidebook. Lucas, S.G. and B.S. Kues (1979). Vertebrate Biostratigraphy of the Eocene Galisteo Formation, North-Central New Mexico. New Mexico Geol.Soc. Guidebook, 30th Field Conference, Santa Fe Country. New Mexico - Oligocene Lucas, S.G. (1986). Oligocene Mammals from the Black Range, Southwestern New Mexico. New Mexico Geological Society Guidebook, 37th Field Conference, Truth or Consequences. Lucas, S.G. (1983). The Baca Formation and the Eocene-Oligocene Boundary in New Mexico. New Mexico Geological Society Guidebook, 34th Field Conference, Socorro Region II. New Mexico - Miocene Aby, S.B., G.S. Morgan and D.J. Koning (2011). A paleontological survey of a part of the Tesuque Formation near Chimaya, New Mexico, and a summary of the biostratigraphy of the Pojoaque Member (Middle Miocene, Late Barstovian). In: Geology of the Tusas Mountains and Ojo Caliente. New Mexico Geological Society 62nd Annual Fall Field Conference Guidebook. Jasinski, S.E. (2015). Middle Miocene Carnivora of New Mexico (Tesuque Formation): Species Patterns, Richness and Faunal Turnover. In: Fossil Record 4. Sullivan, R.M. and S.G. Lucas (eds.), New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Bulletin 67. Morgan, G.S. and S.G. Lucas Miocene Mammalian Faunas and Biostratigraphy of the Zia Formation, Northern Albuquerque Basin, Sandoval County, New Mexico. NMBMMR OFR 454B. New Mexico - Pliocene Lucas, S.G. and W. Oakes (1986). Pliocene (Blancan) Vertebrates from the Palomas Formation, South-Central New Mexico. New Mexico Geological Society Guidebook, 37th Field Conference, Truth or Consequences, 1986. Lucas, S.G. and G.S. Morgan. Pliocene Mammalian Biostratigraphy and Biochronology at Arroyo De La Parida, Socorro County, New Mexico. NMBMMR OFR 454B. Lucas, S.G., T.E. Williamson and J. Sobus (1993). Plio-Pleistocene stratigraphy, paleoecology, and mammalian biochronology, Tijeras Arroyo, Albuquerque area, New Mexico. New Mexico Geology, Vol.15, Number 1. Morgan, G.S. and S.G. Lucas (2003). Mammalian Biochronology of Blancan and Irvingtonian (Pliocene and Early Pleistocene) Faunas from New Mexico.Bulletin American Museum of Natural History, Number 279, Chapter 12. Morgan, G.S. and S.G. Lucas. Summary of Blancan and Irvingtonian (Pliocene and Early Pleistocene) Mammalian Biochronology of New Mexico. NMBMMR OFR 454B. Morgan, G.S., S.G. Lucas and D.W. Love. Lithostratigraphy and Pliocene Mammalian Biostratigraphy and Biochronology at Belen, Valencia County, New Mexico. NMBMMR OFR 454B. Morgan, G.S., et al. (1997). Pliocene (Latest Hemphillian and Blancan) Vertebrate Fossils from the Mangas Basin, Southwestern New Mexico. In: New Mexico's Fossil Record 1. Lucas, S.G., et al. (eds.), New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Bulletin Number 11. New Mexico - Pleistocene Hall, S.A. (2005). Ice Age Vegetation and Flora of New Mexico. In: New Mexico's Ice Ages. Lucas, S.G., G.S. Morgan and K.E. Ziegler (eds.), New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin Number 28. Harris, A.H. (1993). Quaternary Vertebrates of New Mexico. In: Vertebrate Paleontology of New Mexico. New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin 2. Harris, A.H. and J.S. Findley (1964). Pleistocene-Recent Fauna of the Isleta Caves, Bernalillo County, New Mexico. American Journal of Science, Vol. 262. Lucas, S.G. and G.S. Morgan (1996). Pleistocene vertebrates from the Pecos River valley near Roswell, Chaves County, New Mexico. New Mexico Geology. Morgan, G.S. and L.F. Rinehart (2007). Late Pleistocene (Rancholabrean) mammals from fissure deposits in the Jurassic Todilto Formation, White Mesa Mine, Sandoval County, north-central New Mexico. New Mexico Geology, Vol. 29, Number 2. Morgan, G.S. and S.G. Lucas (2003). Mammalian Biochronology of Blancan and Irvingtonian (Pliocene and Early Pleistocene) Faunas from New Mexico.Bulletin American Museum of Natural History, Number 279, Chapter 12. Morgan, G.S. and S.G. Lucas. Summary of Blancan and Irvingtonian (Pliocene and Early Pleistocene) Mammalian Biochronology of New Mexico. NMBMMR OFR 454B. New Mexico - General Gustavson, T.C. (ed.) (1990). Tertiary and Quaternary Stratigraphy and Vertebrate Paleontology of Parts of Northwestern Texas and Eastern New Mexico. Bureau of Economic Geology, Guidebook 24. Hodnett, J.-P. M. and S.G. Lucas (2015). Paleozoic Fishes of New Mexico: A Review. In: Fossil Vertebrates in New Mexico. Lucas, S.G. and R.M. Sullivan (eds.), New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin Number 68. Lucas, S.G. and J. Zidek (eds.) (1993). Vertebrate Paleontology in New Mexico. New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Bulletin 2. (Read on-line or download a copy.) Lucas, S.G., et al. (2012). Lithostratigraphy, Paleontology, Biostratigraphy, and Age of the Upper Paleozoic Abo Formation Near Jemez Springs, Northern New Mexico, USA. Annals of Carnegie Museum, Vol.80, Number 4. New York Baird, G.C. and C.E. Brett (2008). Late Givetian Taghanic bioevents in New York State: New discoveries and questions. Bulletin of Geosciences, 83(4). Brett, C.E. (1974). Biostratigraphy and Paleoecology of the Windom Shale Member (Moscow Formation) in Erie County, New York. New York State Geological Society Guidebook, 4th Annual Meeting. Brett, C.E., A.J. Bartholemew and G.C. Baird (2007). Biofacies Recurrence in the Middle Devonian of New York State: An Example with Implications for Evolutionary Paleoecology. Palaios, Vol.22. Brett, C.E., et al. (1999). The Walcott-Rust Quarry: Middle Ordovician Trilobite Konservat-Lagerstätten. J.Paleont.,73(2). Bush, A.M., et al. (2015). Revised correlation of the Frasnian-Famennian boundary and Kellwasser Events (Upper Devonian) in shallow marine paleoenvironments of New York State. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 433. Clarke, J.M. (1885). On the Higher Devonian Faunas of Ontario County, New York. United States Geological Survey, Bulletin 16. Cleland, H.F. (1903). A Study of the Fauna of the Hamilton Formation of the Cayuga Lake Section in Central New York. U.S. Geological Survey, Bulletin Number 206. Epstein, J.B. (1993). Stratigraphy of Silurian Rocks in Shawangunk Mountain, Southeastern New York, Including a Historical Review of Nomenclature. United States Geological Survey Bulletin 1839. Farrell, U.C., et al. (2013). Paleoredox and Pyritization of Soft-Bodied Fossils in the Ordovician Frankfort Shale of New York. American Journal of Science, Vol.313. Huddle, J.W. and J.E. Repetski (1981). Conodonts from the Genesee Formation in Western New York. U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1032-B. (Thanks to Mediospirifer for locating this one!) Ivany, L.C., et al. (2009). Relative taxonomic and ecologic stability in Devonian marine faunas of New York State: A test of coordinated stasis. Paleobiology, 35(4). Landing, E. and S.R. Westrop (2006). Lower Ordovician Faunas, Stratigraphy, and Sea-Level History of the Middle Beekmantown Group, Northeastern New York. J.Paleont., 80(5). Landing, E., S.R. Westrop and L. Van Aller Hernick (2003). Uppermost Cambrian-Lower Ordovician Faunas and Laurentian Platform Sequence Stratigraphy, Eastern New York and Vermont. J.Paleont., 77(1). Linsley, D.M. (1994). Devonian Paleontology of New York. Paleontological Research Institution, Special Publication 21. Maletz, J. (2008). Middle to Upper Devonian Stratigraphy and Faunas of Erie County, Western New York. Field Trip NE, GSA. Mehrtens, C.J. and B. Selleck (2002). Middle Ordovician Section at Crown Point Peninsula. In: Guidebook for field trips in New York and Vermont. McClelland, J. and P. Karabinos (eds.), University of Vermont. Senglaub, M.D. (2004). Paleoecology of the Lower Devonian Esopus and Carlisle Center Formations (Tristates Group) of New York State. Masters Thesis, Bowling Green State University. Stokes, P.J. and H.A. Schreiber (2017). Penn Dixie Fossil Park & Nature Reserve: A Window Into the Devonian Period of Western New York. NYSGA 2017 Guidebook. Stokes, P.J. and J.J. Zambito. Using Marine Fossils to Unlock the Middle Devonian Paleoenvironments of Western New York (For K-12 Teachers and Collectors). Ver Straeten, C.A., D.H. Griffing and C.E. Brett (1994). The Lower Part of the Middle Devonian Marcellus "Shale", Central to Western New York State: Stratigraphy and Depositional History. New York State Geological Association, 67th Annual Meeting Guidebook. North Carolina Berry, E.W. (1907). Contributions to the Pleistocene Flora of North Carolina. The Journal of Geology, Vol.15, Number 4. Blackwelder, B.W. (1981). Stratigraphy of Upper Pliocene and Lower Pleistocene Marine and Estuarine Deposits of Northeastern North Carolina and Southeastern Virginia. United States Geological Survey, Bulletin 1502-B. Crane, C.D. (2011). Vertebrate Paleontology and Taphonomy of the Late Cretaceous (Campanian) Bladen Formation, Bladen County, North Carolina. Masters Thesis - East Carolina University. (232 pages) Emmons, E. (1858). Agriculture of the Eastern Counties Together With Descriptions of Fossils from the Marl Beds. Report of the North Carolina Geological Survey. (351 pages) Emmons, E. (1856). Geological Report of the Midland Counties of North Carolina. George P. Putnam & Co. (435 pages) Fraser, N.C., et al. (1996). A Triassic Lagerstätte from eastern North America. Nature (letters), Vol.380. Heckert, A.B., et al. (2012). Diverse New Microvertebrate Assemblage from the Upper Triassic Cumnock Formation, Sanford Subbasin, North Carolina, USA. Journal of Paleontology, 86(2). Hibbard, J.P., et al. (2009). Significance of New Ediacaran Fossils and U-Pb Zircon Ages from the Albemarle Group, Carolina Terrane of North Carolina. The Journal of Geology, Vol.117. Kellum, L.B. (1926). Paleontology and Stratigraphy of the Castle Hayne and Trent Marls in North Carolina. United States Geological Society, Professional Paper 143. Liutkus-Pierce, C.M., N.C. Fraser and A.B. Heckert (2014). Stratigraphy, sedimentology, and paleontology of the Upper Triassic Solite Quarry, North Carolina and Virginia. The Geological Society of America, Field Guide 35. Mansfield, W.C. (1929). New Fossil Mollusks from the Miocene of Virginia and North Carolina, With a Brief Outline of the Divisions of the Chesapeake Group. Proceedings of the U.S. National Museum, Vol.74, Article 14. Ray, C.E. and D.J. Prohaska (2001). Geology and Paleontology of the Lee Creek Mine, North Carolina III.Smithsonian Contributions to Paleobiology, Number 90. (369 pages: Low-res download is 15.7MB) Ray, C.E., ed. (1987). Geology and Paleontology of the Lee Creek Mine, North Carolina II. Smithsonian Contributions to Paleobiology, Number 61. (296 pages; Low-res download is 19MB) Ray, C.E., ed. (1983). Geology and Paleontology of the Lee Creek Mine, North Carolina I. Smithsonian Contributions to Paleobiology, Number 53. (540 pages; Low-res download is 28MB) Sohl, N.F. and R.A. Christopher (1983). The Black Creek-Peedee Formational Contact (Upper Cretaceous) in the Cape Fear River Region of North Carolina. United States Geological Survey, Professional Paper 1285. Stephenson, L.W. (1927). Additions to the Upper Cretaceous Invertebrate Faunas of the Carolinas. Proceedings U.S. National Museum, Vol.72, Number 10. Ward, L.W., D.R. Lawrence and B.W. Blackwelder (1978). Stratigraphic Revision of the Middle Eocene, Oligocene and Lower Miocene - Atlantic Coastal Plain of North Carolina. Geological Survey Bulletin 1457-F, United States Government Printing Office. Weaver, P.G., M.A.S. McMenamin and R.C. Tacker (2006). Paleoenvironmental and paleobiogeographic implications of a new Ediacaran body fossil from the Neoproterozoic Carolina Terrane, Stanly County, North Carolina. Precambrian Research, 150. Weaver, P.G., et al. (2008). Additional Ediacaran Body Fossils of South-Central North Carolina. Southeastern Geology, Vol.45, Number 4. North Dakota North Dakota - Cretaceous Carpenter, S.J., et al. (1988). Diagenesis of Fossiliferous Concretions from the Upper Cretaceous Fox Hills Formation, North Dakota. Journal of Sedimentary Petrology, Vol.58, Number 4. Gill, J.R. and W.A. 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