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  1. New Zealand Kids Discovered This Fossil of New Giant Penguin Species on a Field Trip Paleontologists say the bird would have been roughly the size of a ten-year-old child Corryn Wetzel, Smithsonian Magazine, September 17, 202 Children's Field Trip Yields New Penguin Species Kairuku waewaeroa lived eons ago in New Zealand John Johnson, Newser, Sep 17, 2021 The open access paper is: Simone Giovanardi, Daniel T. Ksepka & Daniel B. Thomas, 2021. A giant Oligocene fossil penguin from the North Island of New Zealand Article: e1953047 Receive
  2. Currently away from home on a work trip but that has allowed me to explore the silt stone laid down by Lake Manuherikia in the Otago region of New Zealand. The period is early to mid Miocene (16-19 million years). I have spent the last couple of evenings searching sites for fossil leaves or anything else I can find. FYI the bottle cap is for scale. I have nothing else with me but I figure most bottle caps are the same the world over. The above is part of a large palm frond. Hyridella shells above in matrix.
  3. T Stolberger

    Mystery Specimen ID

    I found a fossil fragment on site the other day unlike anything I have ever come across before. Some ideas that have been suggested by colleagues include a bone fragment, petrified wood, or a bryozoan colony. The fragment is approximately 2.5 cm long and half a cm wide, is Pliocene in age, and comes from the Kaawa Formation for anyone who knows their New Zealand stratigraphy well. Im not looking for an ID as such, more just a general indication of what I'm dealing with from anyone else who has come across something similar. Many thanks!
  4. will stevenson

    Some New Zealand teeth, please help!

    Hi guys, I have come to you for help as I really don’t know what I’m talking about when it comes to New Zealand shark teeth (I’m fairly sure these are all selachian), anyway, I have separated them into what I think are the separate species based on my understanding of tooth morphology, sorry for lack of scale, for reference the teeth vary from around 2mm-5mm here is species 1 side view of the most complete one There appear to be very faint serrations more prevalent in one of them
  5. Just out of curiosity I need yall opinions on this. So in 2005 a paper was published analysing various theropod material from Chatham Island, New Zealand, and the deposit they were in was aged to be 61 million years old. The authors of the paper interpreted this as the fossils had been eroded from a Mesozoic deposit and were reburied in an Cenozoic one. However multiple outcrops of the same formation have been found containing more dinosaur fossils, this and considering there is evidence to suggest that this is a bone bed could possibly mean that this is the first evidence of non-a
  6. Site preserves 23 million year old leaf fossils in diatomite and gives excellent climate record. Locals are pressuring mining interests to preserve scientific value. https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/new-zealand-fossils
  7. Ancient kauri trees capture last collapse of Earth’s magnetic field By Paul Voosen, Science, February 18, 2021 Ancient Trees Show When The Earth's Magnetic Field Last Flipped Out By Nell Greenfield-Boyce, Short Wave, NPR, February 18, 2021 Buried treasure - subfossil swamp kauri By Kate Evans, New Zealand Geographic Voosen, P., 2021, Kauri trees mark magnetic flip 42,000 years ago Science. vol. 371, Issue 6531, pp. 766 DOI: 10.1126/science.371.6531.766 The paper is: Cooper, A., Turney, C.S.M., Palmer, J. and others
  8. Hi All I found my largest shark tooth this past weekend here in New Zealand. I thought it was a Great White at first but a few people have thought it might be a transitional one. I was wondering if one of the shark tooth experts could have a look and let me know their thought Here is a bit of video of it as well: https://youtu.be/U-i8W2aOtLE?t=373 Thanks!
  9. T Stolberger

    Help with fossil crab ID

    I'm looking for help with finding a genera from this chela/ crab claw, found in Cenozoic rock from Northwest Nelson, South Island, New Zealand. It is fairly weathered, and was originally split between two separate stones lying on the beach. A little reconstruction and preparation produced the result in the image. It was not in-situ so I am unsure which rock group it is associated with. I'm guessing it is either late Oligocene or early Miocene in age based on what I know of the area, but I could be wrong. I'm hoping there are some crab experts out there who will know what this is straight
  10. Australian Paleontology

    Joan Wiffen's Theropod

    Hello there, so in New Zealand there is an indermitate theropod dinosaur most commonly referred to as Joan Wiffen's Theropod. I am extremely confused on what the specimen actually is because some sources say the specimen is represented by a toe bone while others say a partial vertebrae. Also if anyone could tell me the specimen number (GNS 00 000, for example) or link a scientific paper explaining actually what it is i would be highly appreciative, thank you
  11. What is your opinion on its classification and if so is the material we have sufficient enough to make it a distinct taxon? Joan Wiffen Reference material
  12. heres a link to a newly described fossil seal that we have been finding bones and skulls of here in taranaki, new zealand for the last 15 or so years. https://www.google.com/search?client=opera&hs=0U9&biw=1496&bih=754&tbm=nws&sxsrf=ALeKk01vc72KwYUUtagYwhLgRk96jWpnXQ%3A1605241533476&ei=vQquX5veHM7w9QPNhoLgBQ&q=new+zealand+fossil+seal&oq=new+zealand+fossil+seal&gs_l=psy-ab.3...33364.36178.0.37013.5.5.0.0.0.0.554.1364.0j1j3j5-1.5.0....0...1c.1.64.psy-ab..0.0.0....0.uRROVU4bIrg
  13. RJB

    MrBig001T.JPG

    From the album: Fossil Crabs

    one of my best crabs from New Zealand, Miocene. Took 110 hours to prep, A very nice specimen.
  14. Doctor Mud

    My biggest Tumido crab yet!

    Well I started my next project tonight, and compared to the last one, this one is so much fun (so far ). The rock is softer and it also peels off the shell beautifully. Things are going to get a bit more complicated I can see already as there is a thick layer of powdery calcite around the edges. I originally thought it was shell and I’d stripped off the shell the whole time But I checked with the scope and it’s calcite. Some before pictures. The concretion is 24 cm (9.5 inches) wide. The claws were already exposed like this, I found it wedge
  15. Tidgy's Dad

    Miocene Plants Predict Future.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-53842626
  16. The lockdown has given me some time to go through some of my finds from the last year. I had another closer look at this fossil that I found at a Cretaceous marine site here in New Zealand. It almost looks like it could be a hollow bone? Has anyone got any idea what it could be?
  17. Oxytropidoceras

    Ordovician Graptolite Evolution

    New light shed on ancient NZ fossils Ancient marine creatures once believed to have been mere ‘bit players’ in the fossil record have now found fame. Victoria University Of Wellington https://www.newsroom.co.nz/ideasroom/2020/03/05/1067165/new-light-shed-on-ancient-nz-fossils The paper is: Crampton, J.S., Cooper, R.A., Foote, M. and Sadler, P.M., 2020 Ephemeral species in the fossil record? Synchronous coupling of macroevolutionary dynamics in mid-Paleozoic zooplankton. Paleobiology, vol 46, no. 1, pp.1-13. https://www.cambridge.o
  18. @Doctor Mud and I managed to get away for an overnight hike / fossil hunt we have been talking about for ages! We set off with high hopes around 11am from near Motunau Beach in New Zealand and within 2min,I found a beautiful crab fossil and a new species for me, an Actinocarcinus sp. A little further into the hike I noticed some shiny flecks in the cliff which turned out to be some cookie cutter looking shark teeth, probably Miocene era. This was really exciting for me as I don't often find shark teeth here where I am. It was an incredibly hot day, somewhat c
  19. Hey there! I'm back again, and again I'm on another continent I moved to New Zealand at the beginning of the year, and in between the incredible fishing and birding I forced myself to head out to Glen Afric (2 hour drive) for a stab at some crabs. The day started out with a couple belemnites, quite long and skinny. The concretions were various shades of khaki to black, some of them still more clay than rock. There were various shells encrusted in them. I kept my eyes peeled for a 'crab' shaped concretion, however this was easier said than done. After a full lap (about
  20. Paleonique

    Glen Afric New Zealand fossil

    My family and I have gone on a trip for the holidays so when we recently decided to take a trip down to Glen Afric again, we quickly realized we were no longer used to the hill that leads down to the beach. Luckily it was worth it and as always we found a few fossils that I have yet to learn about. Fossil number 1 Fossil number 2 I think this one could be a whale bone. I'm just wondering what part it could be Fossil number 2 Fossil number 3 As for the last fossil, I wa
  21. I braved the 30 degree Celsius heat to check out one of my local rivers, the Waipara, last weekend. I've had good luck there before with finding whale vertebrae and was lucky enough to find another one this time which makes 3 from a 1km stretch of river. I also managed to find the usual oyster shells and even a nice bit of petrified wood. Here is a video of the hunt:
  22. I’ve been in New Zealand for over a month and spent a lot of time on the coast famous for the big Tumidocarcinus crab concretions. Unfortunately my trip was mainly to visit my father who was ill and he passed away while I was here. Time on the beach has been a good distraction and helps to start the healing process. You might be surprised that I usually have the beach to myself and the solitude and sounds, sites and smells of the coast are a comfort. In terms of fossils it was my best trip yet, but this came from lots and lots of walking, boulder hopping, and early star
  23. Paleonique

    ID New Zealand fossil

    We went to Glen Afric for another fossil hunt, I think we found some interesting rocks (possibly with fossils in them) If you have any ideas on what they are, please let me know. Here are the photos for the first rock we found- (there are 3 rocks) Rock number 1- Rock number 2- Rock number 3-
  24. Paleonique

    Glen Afric New Zealand fossil

    A few weeks ago, we stumbled upon a concretion along the shore at Glen Afric. These are the photos. If anyone can ID them, it would be much appreciated. (length is given in cm) (The weight is 4kg) Top Height Bottom
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