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  1. Mahnmut

    Entelodont

    From the album: Skeleton models

    Modelled mainly after the skeletal made by bLAZZE92 via wikipedia
  2. Pseudogygites

    Caddisfly Larva?

    Hi again everyone! I have a small fossil from a unit of lacustrine laminated silt from here in Saskatoon from the very late Pleistocene or early Holocene. The unit directly overlays a unit of till from the Wisconsinan glaciation. The unit contains carbonized plants stems, some of which are filled with wood boring beetle larva frass, diatoms, and burrows similar to Cruziana. In one of these hollowed-out burrows, I found this fossil, which is approximately 0.5 mm in length. It is composed of many extremely small carbonized plant fragments, all arranged horizontally from longest to shortest. I ha
  3. The open access paper is: Plotnick, R., & Lamsdell, J. (2022). Eurypterids from the Price Formation of Virginia: First Eurypterids from the Mississippian of North America. Journal of Paleontology, 1-5. doi:10.1017/jpa.2022.84 An unrelated paper: Vrazo, M.B., Trop, J.M. and Brett, C.E., 2014. A new eurypterid Lagerstätte from the upper Silurian of Pennsylvania. Palaios, 29(8), pp.431-448. Yorus, Paul H.
  4. Hi! I’m still trying to identify one fossil from a particular unit of Pleistocene/Early Holocene lacustrine silt from my hometown of Saskatoon, but I figured I would look away from it for a bit to try and identify another fossil from the same unit I’ve been unable to classify. I have two specimens, both apparently of the same species. They are both approximately 0.5 millimetres across. They are perfectly circular, with lines radiating from the centre and rings of alternating colours (possibly representing growth lines). One specimen is photographed dorsally, showing its circular shape, the ot
  5. TaterTexas

    Is this a fossil?

    My daughter found this while on a hike through a creek bed. The top of the bank was roughly 20ft high. Tom Green county, Texas. There were a couple of pieces of petrified wood in the same area. I've seen plenty of animal bones, it has that texture, but the shape is peculiar.
  6. I know that Acro stuff is quite rare and hard to come by, but I was wondering what the best spots in Texas are to find such fossil material. I live in the state, so it would not be too much of an issue to travel to a spot or two to hunt for these theropod fossils. To sum it up, my question is: what are the best spots in Texas to legally hunt for and collect Acrocanthosaurus fossils/teeth (preferably without heavy duty tools or machinery)? If there are any, it would be much appreciated if you list the formation and location.
  7. ...especially Europe - North America. I read very often here on the forum about the high costs of sending parcels from the US to Europe. I am very interested in the real price of that. In the different direction, the price for sending parcels, for example, from Austria to North America is: Up to 2 kg: Euro 25.29,- Up to 4 kg: Euro 37.64,- Up to 10 kg: Euro 71.64,- These are the prices of the federal postal service (www.post.at). At the moment, you have to multiply the Euro with about 1.13 to get the price in USD. Would someone
  8. Birdyyz

    Large fossilized bone?

    Hello, I found this possible fossilized bone in the creek on my friends 26 acre Farm in poweshiek County, Iowa. The farm is located on Glacier land. The farm has very sandy soil and large Hills that slope down to the creek. I have found many easily identifiable fossilized bones such as jaw, femur, pelvic and teeth but this one looks very odd but seems to have the correct pores and texture. Any help will be appreciated thank you.
  9. Hello I'm new to the fossil forum and hopefully I provide enough information. I found this fossil egg looking Rock in poweshiek County Iowa. One of my close friends owns a farm and we have been finding several possible fossils in the creek and near the surface on the hillside. The farm is 26 acres and located on Glacier land which is very Sandy with steep hills down to the creek which starts about two miles away from me natural spring and never dries up. This one was found about two feet below the water, sand and mud. It appears as if the little rascal was hatching, that is if it's an egg. Tha
  10. grg1109

    Comprehensive book?

    Hi. I'm wondering if someone could recommend a comprehensive book on marine fossil invertrabates of North America covering all ages. I have the "Index Species of North America" book. I also own a couple of books on Devonian Fossils in NY. Although these have been helpful...I would like a good comprehensive book so as not to keep bothering you all here for fossil identification. Thanks Greg
  11. I'm seeking this obscure but important paper on Pennsylvanian floras. If you have access to a copy, please consider sharing it. Thanks! BODE, H., 1958: "Die floristische Gliederung des Oberkarbons der Vereinigten Staaten von Nordamerika." ("Floristic subdivision of upper Carboniferous age rocks in North America") Zeitschrift der Deutschen Geologischen Gesellschaft, Band 110, Heft 2, p. 217 - 259. DOI: 10.1127/zdgg/110/1958/217
  12. Looking for help with this Early Ordovician (Floian) trilobite from the Powell Dolostone of Arkansas, USA. The specimens (GRAY FIGURE below) were identified by Taylor (1968) as cf. Lannacus nericiensis Wiman, but that species (now a species of Megalaspides) doesn't seem like a great match, as the author notes in the paper. In fact, I'm not sure that proper Megalaspides even lived in North America. Last week, an Arkansan found another asaphide specimen (MAIZE AND BLUE FIGURE below) in these same rocks, which may or may not be the same species as the specimens described by Taylor.
  13. I'm working up a series of fossil field guides for various formations. I'd like to provide a visual indicator of which fossils are rare, which are common, and which are abundant, without getting in the way of the visual layout of the fossils & identifying information. The complete set of categories I am working with is {Abundant, Common, Rare, Very Rare, Common to Abundant, Rare to Abundant, Rare to Common, Present, and Questionable}. Has anyone seen a good way that a field guide of any kind has provided such a visual indicator as a page-wide element of visual layout? Attached is my first
  14. Found near Winchester Virginia in the needmore formation, having a hard time figuring out the species. Still have to clean up his right side, but there’s at least one genal spine preserved, can’t tell yet if there’s any spines along the ends of each thorax segment. Had a good tip on reddit that it might be a Reedops but the librigena area seems not as substantial on mine. Likewise the attached genal spine seems much finer and arcs further away from the thorax. Has a smooth glabella (with the exception of the furrows) which I also don’t see any examples of when I search Reedops either. Eyes are
  15. Although identification of Hadrosaurid teeth in North America is very difficult or impossible some older publications by John Horner give us some information to help us with a few. The information goes back a bit so there might be some new understanding but will share what is published. If anyone has publications that can add to the dentary information of teeth from North America please feel free to post it. Horner notes that on dentary teeth all Saurolophinae teeth have diamond-shaped crown whereas Lambeosaurinae teeth are more elongate see figure 13.4. So one may not be able
  16. Hi everyone, I just got into fossil collecting and for some reason Ammonites have my attention. I have a small background in beetle taxonomy, so I was curious if there is a dichotomous key for North American Ammonites? Are dichotomous keys even a thing for fossils? Is there any comprehensive books or guides for Ammonites in English? All I am aware of is the "Treasties on Invertebrate Paleontology" and the fourm search function isn't helping me out either. Thanks in advance.
  17. I live in the Northeast of the USA. I found this bone out in the forest yesterday and I’m having trouble identifying it due to its size. As shown in the photos, the bone looks very scratched up, probably chewed on, and both joints on each end have been snapped off. The bone was cracked down the middle, then fell off my counter which split it in half. I don’t have a metric ruler, but 12 inches is about 30 centimeters. If it had the joints I think it would be closer to 15 inches, or 38 centimeters. I was thinking it was a white tail deer tibia or possibly a femur (I was leaning more towards tibi
  18. My fossil hunting friend came across this object in a creek in eastern Missouri. At first glance this ~1 cm diameter ball with stout spikes would seem to be some sort of camerate crinoid, but the spikes cover the entire surface, with no apparent place to put arms, column, mouth, or anus. (Side note: That must be the crinoid folksong community's version of "Head, Shoulders, Knees, and Toes.") From there my fallback would be coral, or perhaps sponge, but the complete coverage around the whole sphere (see attached video) has me a bit baffled. The creek flows through mostly Meramecian
  19. Hey guys, I was wondering if there is any good books to help identify dinosaur fossils? Thanks so much, Wyatt
  20. Would anybody by chance have a PDF copy of "North American Pleospongia" by Vladimir J. Okulitch DOI/link: https://doi.org/10.1130/SPE48 If you do please PM me!
  21. Hello group. I just wanted to share some photos of a Mastodon Americanus tooth I purchased and detailed. I've included the before and after photos. There are no enhancements to this fossil, just a lite coat of wax.
  22. The French magazine 'fossiles' recently published a very complete and richly illustrated article about uncoiled ammonites from the western inland sea (Upper Cretaceous –North America) Fossiles, n°39, juillet-août-septembre 2019 ; pages 5 to 42 (in french language…); -quarterly review by annual subscription- www.minerauxetfossiles.com revue fossiles002.pdf
  23. Hello again! I'm almost ready to label my Carboniferous fossils, and since I know pretty much nothing about plants fossils, I was hoping to get some help Specimen #1 from Pennsylvania, USA: Specimen #2 from Illinois, USA - each half of one nodule: Specimen #3 from New Brunswick, Canada: Specimen #4 from New Brunswick, Canada: Specimen #5 from Poland: Specimen #6 from England: Thanks in advance for your help! Monica
  24. It seems to me that our feral horses should be considered "Native Wildlife" like any other. Why did horses in North America go extinct?
  25. I have a few questions about trilobites. 1) Does anyone know the size of the largest trilobite ever found? 2) What is the average size of a trilobite in North America, specifically New York state? 3) What is the average size of a trilobite found in Morocco? 4) Why does it seem like trilobites are mostly found in New York state and Morocco? Do maps of what the Earth might of looked like during the Devonian period? I had a bit of a disappointing first hunting trip for these little creatures in Tully, NY yesterday and any answers that will help me better und
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