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Found 4 results

  1. This November there were 2 days on the beach when I found over 336 various sizes of gastropods covered with at least 2 different types of bryozoa. I have found similar gastropods covered with coral from the Pliocene in Florida. These fascinate me (hardly of any interest to others on the beach whose focus is shark teeth) because they have a story: the gastropod dies; a hermit crab occupies the dead shell; bryozoa attaches itself to the shell and begins to cover it. I had found maybe 5 of these gastropods at the high tide mark prior to these two days. It was in low tide areas that i found the 336 (previously I had searched the same areas and found none. After the 2 days I did not find anymore even in other areas of the beach some distance away. I am aware that id of bryozoa is difficult but perhaps someone can recognize the "bumpy" pimply variety in the picture. But more importantly, I am looking for confirmation that these are indeed fossil (beach finds) and any idea as to their age? I also found about 15 small individual bryozoan colonies.
  2. Blister Pearls

    I have never found pearls before so I am posting for confirmation. I have seen modern blister pearls at rock shows. Also wondering if these are fossil or modern day. The background for these finds is my wife had oysters locally and one had what we believe is a blister pearl. She seems to have an affinity for pearls as she has found 4 pearls (not blister)--2 in mussels and 2 in oysters. A few days later while walking the beach I found the large 1 1/2 inch pearl in a piece of quahog (Mercenaria) shell. Then I found other quahogs with interior coatings that differed from the normal shell. These had small raised bumps or "pimples". Then my wife found a cockel shell that had a small cluster of pearls. i wonder if these are possible Pliocene fossil pearls rather than recent? There are Miocene/Pliocene fossils shark teeth and fish material. Are these in fact blister pearls and how do I preserve them? Thanks for looking at these.First picture is modern oyster with blister pearl. Quahog blister pearl--fossil pearl?
  3. Help in identification

    This "bone" (sounds like fossil bone not modern) has a very distinctive grooved surface. It is 4 1/2" long, 3" high 1" thick. In the top groove my index finger fits perfectly. In what looks to me to be a joint surface (cup depression) my thumb conforms. I have found Cretaceous fossils-Exogyra and sea urchins. In previous years fossil shark teeth. The beach has been "renourished" I was told from 3 miles offshore. Very few shark teeth this year and they have been Miocene/Pliocene--great white, a small meg. Seen others with bull and sand tigers but no Cretaceous shark teeth. This bone has a very distinctive coloration--light brown/yellowish. I found 2 other fossils with this color. (Will post these later) Any ideas would be appreciated. Thanks
  4. Help in identification

    This unusual fossil is3 1/4 inches long, 2 3/4 at widest point and tapers to 2 inches. It is 1 1/8,inches thick. The shape is somewhat oval and tapers. This is the 2nd fossil with this coloration that I found in November. Fossils on the beach range from Cretaceous--Exogyra shells and sea urchins to Miocene/Pliocene megalodon and great white shark teeth. The beach has been "renourished" after a recent hurricane. Formerly abundant shark teeth are now very sparse. It does not appear to be bone. The idea of a "tusk" occurred to me but I am unfamiliar with what a tusk would look like. Any ideas or even better questions would be appreciated. Previously (yesterday) posted a bone found in the same area. Additional pictures will follow. The reverse side
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