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  1. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Diplograptus amplexicaulis Graptolite & Cryptolithoides ulrichi Trilobite on matrix SITE LOCATION: Viola Limestone, Murray County, Oklahoma, USA TIME PERIOD: Ordovician Period (445-485 Million Years ago) Data: Diplograptus was a Cambrian genus of graptolites. Graptolithina is a class of hemichordate animal, the members of which are known as graptolites. Graptolites are colonial animals known chiefly as fossils from the Middle Cambrian (Series 3, Stage 5) through the Lower Carboniferous (Mississippian). The name graptolite comes from
  2. Hey All, I don't know if there is even enough of a fossil here to identify. I am nowhere near good enough to give a real good guess. First thought was either a small piece of a cephlapod or chiton. If it is a gastropod, it is a type that I have never found before. It was found on the side of a dry creek bed near Willow Springs, Missouri, USA in an Ordovician Formation. The remnant that remains measures 13mm wide by 15mm long. The bed the fossil remnant is laying is measures 24mm long. There is an indented type of division going horizontally across the fossil. It does not go
  3. Once again, I am studying and working on my own identifications. I am just needing someone to either confirm or correct me on this one. My first guess when I saw it was it was a gastropod of some sort, but after researching and looking at images online, my guess is that it is an internal cast of a hyolith. It was found in northwest Howell County, Missouri, USA. The fossil in question measures approximately 16mm and the host rock measures 80mm across. The widest point across of the cavity where the fossil in question lies is 8mm. Once again, I am truly appreciative of any help that you ar
  4. First point, I cannot get a decent image of this fossil to save my life. That being said, I took a bunch of sub par image in hopes someone can put the pieces together to come up with an id. It measures approximately 35x22mm and is definitely a different material than the host rock. I found it in the same area that I have been finding all of my other fossils. This is outside Willow Springs, Missouri, USA. I originally thought it might be a rugose coral of some sort, but it looks to have horizontal segments or something similar. I am about 95% (or more) positive that it is a fossil and not
  5. turtlefoot

    Crystalized fossil or a pipe dream?

    I have a rock feature that I am a bit doubtful, but hopeful about. I have a few "crystalized" fossils and have seen some very nice ones from near my hunting area also posted. This does mean that there are some out there. This little feature measures almost 11mm long and is 6mm wide. In hand, the left side really looks like a head segment of some sort with the line and what does look like two eye spots. The main area has what looks like segment end features going around the sides. The square crystal feature in the center is a totally new one for me. I have found literally hundreds, if no
  6. Hi All, Why am I not finding any trilobites (or even any identifiable trilobite partials)? I know the obvious two answers would be that I am either overlooking them or I am hunting in an area that they will not be located in. I am hunting outside of Willow Springs, Missouri, USA in what I believe to be Ordovician Period rock. I am finding all sorts of crinoid, brachiopod, gastropod, bryozoa, rugose, favistella fossils and more. I have even found a large stromatolite reef but I cannot find a trilobite fossil. I would think with the diversity of the fossils that I am finding, tr
  7. We have a fist-sized glass-like object that contains 22 microscopic organisms from the Cambrian and Ordovician periods. We theorize that it was produced by a meteor impacting sand and water resulting in perfectly preserved organisms, some of which also have soft tissue preserved. We do not have equipment to investigate this object any further and are seeking someone to help validate this finding. Does anyone have knowledge of a clear glass "rock" with encapsulated 500 mya organisms ever being found?
  8. Dpaul7

    Lloydolithus lloydi Trilobite 1.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Lloydolithus lloydi Trilobite Llandeilo Series of England Ordovician Period (485.4–443.8 million years ago) The trilobite measures 5/8 by 5/8 inches and is on a matrix measuring 1 1/4 by 1 1/4 inches. Lloydolithus is a genus of trilobites from the Late Ordovician of Europe. Ecology: fast-moving low-level epifaunal suspension feeder. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Class: †Trilobita Order: †Asaphida Family: †Trinucleidae Genus: †Lloydolithus Species: †lloyodi
  9. Dpaul7

    Lloydolithus lloydi Trilobite 1.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Lloydolithus lloydi Trilobite Llandeilo Series of England Ordovician Period (485.4–443.8 million years ago) The trilobite measures 5/8 by 5/8 inches and is on a matrix measuring 1 1/4 by 1 1/4 inches. Lloydolithus is a genus of trilobites from the Late Ordovician of Europe. Ecology: fast-moving low-level epifaunal suspension feeder. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Class: †Trilobita Order: †Asaphida Family: †Trinucleidae Genus: †Lloydolithus Species: †lloyodi
  10. Dpaul7

    Geocoma Corinata - Morocco 1.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Geocoma corinata Brittle Star Anti-Atlas Mountains, Morocco Ordovician Period (485.4-443.8 million years ago) Geocoma is an extinct genus of brittle stars that lived in the Jurassic. These are slow-moving low-level epifaunal detritivore-suspension feeders. Brittle stars or ophiuroids are echinoderms in the class Ophiuroidea closely related to starfish. They crawl across the sea floor using their flexible arms for locomotion. The ophiuroids generally have five long, slender, whip-like arms which may reach up to 60 cm (24 in) in length on the largest specimens. They are also known as se
  11. Dpaul7

    Geocoma Corinata - Morocco 1.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Geocoma corinata Brittle Star Anti-Atlas Mountains, Morocco Ordovician Period (485.4-443.8 million years ago) Geocoma is an extinct genus of brittle stars that lived in the Jurassic. These are slow-moving low-level epifaunal detritivore-suspension feeders. Brittle stars or ophiuroids are echinoderms in the class Ophiuroidea closely related to starfish. They crawl across the sea floor using their flexible arms for locomotion. The ophiuroids generally have five long, slender, whip-like arms which may reach up to 60 cm (24 in) in length on the largest specimens. They are also known as se
  12. Dpaul7

    Geocoma Corinata - Morocco 1.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Geocoma corinata Brittle Star Anti-Atlas Mountains, Morocco Ordovician Period (485.4-443.8 million years ago) Geocoma is an extinct genus of brittle stars that lived in the Jurassic. These are slow-moving low-level epifaunal detritivore-suspension feeders. Brittle stars or ophiuroids are echinoderms in the class Ophiuroidea closely related to starfish. They crawl across the sea floor using their flexible arms for locomotion. The ophiuroids generally have five long, slender, whip-like arms which may reach up to 60 cm (24 in) in length on the largest specimens. They are also known as se
  13. Dpaul7

    Geocoma Corinata - Morocco 1.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Geocoma corinata Brittle Star Anti-Atlas Mountains, Morocco Ordovician Period (485.4-443.8 million years ago) Geocoma is an extinct genus of brittle stars that lived in the Jurassic. These are slow-moving low-level epifaunal detritivore-suspension feeders. Brittle stars or ophiuroids are echinoderms in the class Ophiuroidea closely related to starfish. They crawl across the sea floor using their flexible arms for locomotion. The ophiuroids generally have five long, slender, whip-like arms which may reach up to 60 cm (24 in) in length on the largest specimens. They are also known as se
  14. Dpaul7

    Orthida brachiopod.JPG

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Order Orthida brachiopod Pennsylvania, USA Ordovician Period (485.4 -443.8 million years ago) Orthida is an extinct order of brachiopods which appeared during the Early Cambrian period and became very diverse by the Ordovician, living in shallow-shelf seas. Orthids are the oldest member of the subphylum Rhynchonelliformea, and is the order from which all other brachiopods of this group stem. Physically they are usually strophic, with well-developed interareas. They also commonly have radiating ribs, sulcus, and fold structures. Typically one valve, often the brachial valve, is flatter
  15. Dpaul7

    Cnemidopyge parva trilobite 1.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Cnemidopyge parva trilobite Llandelian, Llandrndod Wells, Radnor, Wales Ordovician Period (485.4-443.8 Million years ago) Cnemidopyge is a genus of trilobites that lived during the Ordovician. Like all Raphiophorids it is blind, with a headshield (or cephalon) that is subtriangular to subsemicircular, carrying genal spines and a forward directed rapier-like spine on the central raised area (or glabella), with the front of the glabella inflated and the natural fracture lines (or sutures) of the cephalon coinciding with its margin. It may be easily distingu
  16. Dpaul7

    Cnemidopyge parva trilobite 1.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Cnemidopyge parva trilobite Llandelian, Llandrndod Wells, Radnor, Wales Ordovician Period (485.4-443.8 Million years ago) Cnemidopyge is a genus of trilobites that lived during the Ordovician. Like all Raphiophorids it is blind, with a headshield (or cephalon) that is subtriangular to subsemicircular, carrying genal spines and a forward directed rapier-like spine on the central raised area (or glabella), with the front of the glabella inflated and the natural fracture lines (or sutures) of the cephalon coinciding with its margin. It may be easily distingu
  17. Dpaul7

    Starfish Fossil Stenaster

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Stenaster sp. Extinct Starfish Ktaoua Formation, Kaid Rami, Morocco Ordovician Period - (450 millions years ago) Stenaster is an extinct genus of brittle stars that lived from the Ordovician to the Silurian. Brittle stars or ophiuroids are echinoderms in the class Ophiuroidea closely related to starfish. They crawl across the sea floor using their flexible arms for locomotion. The ophiuroids generally have five long, slender, whip-like arms which may reach up to 60 cm (24 in) in length on the largest specimens. They are also known as serpent stars; the New Latin class name O
  18. Dpaul7

    Starfish Fossil Stenaster

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Stenaster sp. Extinct Starfish Ktaoua Formation, Kaid Rami, Morocco Ordovician Period - (450 millions years ago) Stenaster is an extinct genus of brittle stars that lived from the Ordovician to the Silurian. Brittle stars or ophiuroids are echinoderms in the class Ophiuroidea closely related to starfish. They crawl across the sea floor using their flexible arms for locomotion. The ophiuroids generally have five long, slender, whip-like arms which may reach up to 60 cm (24 in) in length on the largest specimens. They are also known as serpent stars; the New Latin class name O
  19. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Diplograptus amplexicaulis Graptolite & Cryptolithoides ulrichi Trilobite on matrix SITE LOCATION: Viola Limestone, Murray County, Oklahoma, USA TIME PERIOD: Ordovician Period (445-485 Million Years ago) Data: Diplograptus was a Cambrian genus of graptolites. Graptolithina is a class of hemichordate animal, the members of which are known as graptolites. Graptolites are colonial animals known chiefly as fossils from the Middle Cambrian (Series 3, Stage 5) through the Lower Carboniferous (Mississippian). The name graptolite comes from
  20. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Diplograptus amplexicaulis Graptolite & Cryptolithoides ulrichi Trilobite on matrix SITE LOCATION: Viola Limestone, Murray County, Oklahoma, USA TIME PERIOD: Ordovician Period (445-485 Million Years ago) Data: Diplograptus was a Cambrian genus of graptolites. Graptolithina is a class of hemichordate animal, the members of which are known as graptolites. Graptolites are colonial animals known chiefly as fossils from the Middle Cambrian (Series 3, Stage 5) through the Lower Carboniferous (Mississippian). The name graptolite comes from
  21. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Diplograptus amplexicaulis Graptolite & Cryptolithoides ulrichi Trilobite on matrix SITE LOCATION: Viola Limestone, Murray County, Oklahoma, USA TIME PERIOD: Ordovician Period (445-485 Million Years ago) Data: Diplograptus was a Cambrian genus of graptolites. Graptolithina is a class of hemichordate animal, the members of which are known as graptolites. Graptolites are colonial animals known chiefly as fossils from the Middle Cambrian (Series 3, Stage 5) through the Lower Carboniferous (Mississippian). The name graptolite comes from
  22. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Phragmolites fimbriata Gastropod SITE LOCATION: Decorah, Iowa, USA TIME PERIOD: Ordovician Period (445-485 Million Years ago) Data: Phragmolites is an extinct genus of molluscs in the family Bucaniidae, paleozoic molluscs of uncertain position possibly being either Gastropods or Monoplacophorans in the superfamily Bellerophontoidea. The family lived from the Lower Ordovician to the Devonian and have shells in which the apertural margins tend to flare. Most genera have a slit and selenizone, others some modification of this feature. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Gastr
  23. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Phragmolites fimbriata Gastropod SITE LOCATION: Decorah, Iowa, USA TIME PERIOD: Ordovician Period (445-485 Million Years ago) Data: Phragmolites is an extinct genus of molluscs in the family Bucaniidae, paleozoic molluscs of uncertain position possibly being either Gastropods or Monoplacophorans in the superfamily Bellerophontoidea. The family lived from the Lower Ordovician to the Devonian and have shells in which the apertural margins tend to flare. Most genera have a slit and selenizone, others some modification of this feature. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Gastr
  24. Dpaul7

    Receptaculites a.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Receptaculites SITE LOCATION: Decorah, Iowa, USA TIME PERIOD: Ordovician Period (445-485 Million Years ago) Data: Receptaculites is the name-bearing genus for an extinct group of conspicuous benthic marine genera, the Receptaculitidae, that lived from the Early Ordovician through the Permian period, peaking in the Middle Ordovician. The group's phylogenetic origin has long been obscure, but the current understanding is that the Receptaculitidae were calcareous algae, probably of the Order Dasycladales. Receptaculitids lived in warm, sha
  25. Dpaul7

    Receptaculites a.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Receptaculites SITE LOCATION: Decorah, Iowa, USA TIME PERIOD: Ordovician Period (445-485 Million Years ago) Data: Receptaculites is the name-bearing genus for an extinct group of conspicuous benthic marine genera, the Receptaculitidae, that lived from the Early Ordovician through the Permian period, peaking in the Middle Ordovician. The group's phylogenetic origin has long been obscure, but the current understanding is that the Receptaculitidae were calcareous algae, probably of the Order Dasycladales. Receptaculitids lived in warm, sha
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