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  1. Hey everyone! I'm currently looking for any teeth from the Oxford Clay, especially those of plesiosaurs and teleosauroid crocs. In exchange, I can offer a variety of crocodile teeth from the Jurassic Tiourarén Formation of Niger like (but not limited to) the ones below.
  2. Hi all, I recently decided to buy the below plesiosaur vertebra after having seen it for a long, long time. It dates to the Callovian of the Oxford Clay and was found at Peterborough. I suspect it may be attributed to Muraenosaurus leedsi, as it comes from a cryptoclidid plesiosaur, but is both larger and more elongate that the typical Oxford Clay Cryptoclidus vertebrae I'm familiar with. Supposedly coming from an old collection, it has a blackened exterior that doesn't cover the entire piece, with the more common buff colour visible underneath. As such, I expecte
  3. PointyKnight

    Oxford Clay Plesiosaur Tooth

    Hey everyone! I recently got a few marine reptile teeth from various formations in the UK, including this partial plesiosaur tooth from the Oxford Clay. The enamel is only partially preserved, but appears unworn and allows for a good look at the enamel ridges of this section. The curved, rather robust shape of the tooth and the irregular distribution of the pretty prominent enamel ridges made me move away from ichthyosaur or machimosaurid as an ID, and seemed more in line with the many plesiosaurs from this formation. But that's where it got more tricky.
  4. PointyKnight

    Oxford Clay Metriorhynchid Teeth

    Hey everyone! Continuing from the other ID thread, I’d like to hear your opinions on another recent acquisition from the Oxford Clay: a group of associated metriorhynchid teeth. Now, there are several metriorhynchid taxa described from the Oxford Clay Formation: Gracilineustes leedsi, Ieldraan melkshamensis, Suchodus brachyrhynchus, Suchodus ?durobrivensis, Thalattosuchus superciliosus, and Tyrannoneustes lythrodectikos. Pretty much all of them have decent descriptions of their dentition available, so comparing these teeth to the literature facilitates the
  5. Rycomerford

    UK Marine Reptile Teeth

    Hello all, I've had two teeth in my collection for many years now. I've recently moved and lost the supplied ID labels that came with them. I've taken this as a nice opportunity to see what others may think they are. I believe if memory serves me right the large tooth (Tooth A in photos) was labeled as a Simolestes. Then the smaller tooth tip (Tooth B in photos) labeled as Liopleurodon. I know both were found in the Wicklesham pit in Faringdon, Oxfordshire, UK. Upon some research, I found an article from 2014 with a Dakosaurus tooth discovered to be the largest in the UK at the ti
  6. Hello, this is my first post on the forum so firstly I apologise if I have done anything wrong. I brought these teeth a number of years ago and have only just got round to sorting them out. The first one was listed as Jurassic crocodile tooth and the second as Jurassic Plesiosaur tooth, they both come from the Oxford clay around Peterborough. I would really like to put a species name to these teeth if possible so any help would be greatly appreciated. My initial thoughts were Metriorhynchus for the crocodile tooth and Cryptoclidus for the Plesiosaur but I am a complete amateur and would love s
  7. In short, I'm trying to figure out exactly what was on the menu: fish or cephalopods. While sorting through some Oxford Clay fish coprolites, I came across this specimen. It was part of a batch purchased years ago. I must have just assumed the inclusions were fish vertebrae, but now I'm not too sure. I know some vertebrae from some fish fry can be hollow, but the texture/material of these inclusions look very different from anything I've seen (including vertebrae in Oxford Clay coprolites). Because of the color and layers, I'm thinking these may be chitinous. That said, I haven't s
  8. Hello everyone, So here we are, back in lock-down so an ideal time to review some finds. Just prior to the latest imprisonment I dashed down to Tidmoor Point near Chesil Beach for the day and grabbed some gravel to look through at home during the long nights. A few interesting items turned up and I wonder if anyone can help ID them please? The first 2 photo's show 3 teeth, the first 2 look to be from the same type of animal, the last evidently something very different. Do you think these were from (small) sharks or some kind of fish, (the divisions on the ruler are in mm). The l
  9. pachy-pleuro-whatnot-odon

    Ichthyosaur paddle digit (Wimereux): hit or miss

    Hi all, Found this stone at Pointe aux Oies in Wimereux two days ago, amongst the pebbles collected next to a shelve down towards sea from the spot where I had found an ichthyosaur vertebra (on matrix) two days before this find. I picked it up because 1) the stone is unusually flat; 2) has exactly the right shape and thickness to it for an ophthalmosaurid ichthyosaur paddle bone (see picture below); 3) has certain ornamentation top and bottom; 4) seems to be of a different type of stone than I've generally come across in the area; and 5) has some weight to it. It vaguely reminds me
  10. Harry_

    Plesiosaur rib?

    Hi all this is the second Hampton Vale id. I found this when wet sifting through some Hampton Vale Oxford clay. If it were from any other place I would say ammonite but I have only ever heard of the ammonite kosmoceras being found here and they have ridging. With this in mind I thought rib. The only animals with this kind of curve and shape of rib found here are plesiosaur pliosaur and ichthyosaur. I was able to rule out ichthyosaur due to shape and I am thinking plesiosaur rib section. Any confirmation or other help with id would be greatly appreciated. Ps at its longest point it is 1.5c
  11. Harry_

    Vertebra?

    Hi, I found this at a Jurassic sight and thought it might a vertebra. Anyone have any ideas as this threw me off quite a bit when trying to I'd it myself! I also found a smaller identical piece which is also photographed belowAt its longest point it is 2.5cm. any help is greatly appreciated. Thanks! P.s. I also have some other fossils from here that I can't id myself about a rib section(?) And some possible tiny fish jaws.
  12. Harry_

    Fish jaw?

    I found these fossils in Hampton Vale (it's quite a well known and fosiliferous site). The site is Oxford clay and jurassic. When doing wet sifting I found lots of these fossils all about 3 or 4mm and I think they are all fish jaws as they r way too small for rodents. This is the first of a few posts I will be doing for id on some fossils from there. Any help is greatly appreciated :). The pictures are of a few I found. Thanks, Harry
  13. Just got back from a trip to England - still fighting the jet lag a bit! 7 hours time difference makes for interesting sleep patterns! Thought y'all might want to see what I all I found in Great Britain! Of course, we started in London, doing all the London things, including the Natural History Museum! Got to see Mary Annings plesioarus and mosasaurs. And the archeoptyrix! And the dino room!! And much much much more.....whew. Left London to visit friends in Bury St. Edmund, near Cambridge. We went to see the Sutton Hoo burial near Ramsholt in Suffolk which I had h
  14. Collected from the K. jason subzone within the Lower Oxford Clay of Peterborough. I thought it could potentially be a palm leaf due to the veins, though wood is prolific - a leaf would be atypical of marine deposits? GBP 1 pence piece for size reference Any help would be much appreciated. Jacob.
  15. LegitimateScientist1

    Oxford Clay Vertebra

    Hello, I bought this vertebra today at the Oxford Fossil and Mineral Show. The seller did not know what it belonged to, only that it was found in the Oxford Clay in Orton, Peterborough. Any help on what this came from would be greatly appreciated, thank you.
  16. Hey all, I thought I would make a thread to show some of my shark teeth that I have collected from the Oxford Clay formation (mainly the Peterborough Member), feel free to comment if I have misidentified anything! Pre-Apologies, some of them are quite small.. Cheers, Jacob.
  17. Here are some interesting small fossils I found on a recent trip. The fossil in the first three pictures is 8mm long. The next two are of a flat fossil about 13mm long
  18. Hi everyone! Took the two hour drive to Kings dyke on Sunday hoping that the new material that had been dumped would produce. For those who are unsure Kings dyke is a nature reserve situated next to a working brick quarry. Every so often they dump a load of the spoil from the quarry in a area that the public are allowed to search in. In the photo below you can see the working quarry in the background and the fenced in fossil area in the foreground. What i would give to be allowed into the main quarry..... This material is absolutely full of Gryphaea 2D ammo
  19. Hey everyone - hope you're all doing all right For the past few days, I was for a short holiday in South England - and while I was in Oxford, I had the chance to see at the Natural History Museum a new, amazing exhibit called Out of the Deep. The display consisted of two remarkable, nearly complete skeletons of marine reptiles - both of them from the ~165-million-year-old Oxford Clay Formation of southern England. One of the skeletons was of a pliosaur (otherwise known as a short-necked plesiosaur) called Peloneustes, which had been discovered in 1994 in Yarnton (Oxfordshire). The
  20. Bong

    Belemnite

    Hi everyone, Attached are pictures of three small fragments of belemnites I found three days ago in Yaxley, Cambridgeshire, UK. In the first picture, two of the belemnites are what I usually find in the lake but one of them looks significantly different. It looks like it is coated in thick white stuff (which I cant identify) which almost makes me believe this may not even be a belemnite fossil. Can anybody tell me what this is please? Is this even belemnite? Thanks, Bong
  21. Bong

    Coprolite or pseudofossil ?

    Hi everyone, This is just another piece of something that I cannot identify, found at Yaxley, Cambridgeshire, UK, three days ago. My first guess is a cropolite fossil but I'm more convinced that this is just a piece of random rock. Yaxely Lake is very rich in Jurassic fossils buried in the Oxford Clay found there. I managed to find a lot of belemnites and ammonites but this isn't one of them. Any help you could offer would be greatly appreciated. Thanks, Bong
  22. Hello all, Currently digging through boxes I haven't looked through for several years and came across these two ammonites. I thought they were Kosmoceras grossourvrei but they seem to be too coarsely ribbed, Kosmoceras pollucinum maybe? Any help or advice with this would be greatly appreciated. Found in the Lower Oxford Clay of Kings dyke, Cambridgeshire. Callovian stage. Cheers, Jacob.
  23. Hello all, As part of my dissertation I have been sifting for micro-fossils using Braiser's (1980) white spirt method. The samples have yielded a range of micro-fossils, most of which I have been able to identify. However, this has stumped me. I believe it to be a tooth/toothplate from a fish, the enamel texture is similar to tooth textures I have seen before, though I cannot identify the species or if it is one. Any help or advice with this would be greatly appreciated! Cheers, Jacob.
  24. Hello, If you have seen my prior posts, it would appear I'm on a lucky streak... I found the blade of this sharks tooth at the fleet, Weymouth It is from the middle Oxford Clay (Upper callovian) - specifically the Q. Lamberti/ C. scarburgense subzone bondary I believe it is Sphenodus longidens, though it is hard to tell without the root! Any help or thoughts would be much appreciated Cheers, Jacob.
  25. Pre-apologies for the picture, it is rather small and doesn't pick up well on my camera... Nonetheless, can anyone help identify this tooth? I have the name on the tip of my tongue, but my books are not with me to help identify it...
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