Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'oxford clay'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • blogs_blog_99
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Books I have enjoyed
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101
  • Trip Reports
  • Glendive Montana dinosaur bone Hell’s Creek
  • Ladonia Texas Fossil Park

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

  1. pachy-pleuro-whatnot-odon

    New longirostrine pliosaur described from the Oxford Clay

    Hi all, Just came across the exciting news that a new pliosaur genus and species has been described from the Callovian stage of the Oxford Clay near Yarnton in Oxfordshire. Dubbed Eardasaurus powelli (Powel's Yarnton lizard), it's a longirostrine thalassophonean pliosaur that is slightly more derived than Peloneustes philarchus (with which it shares numerous anatomical features) and forms a sister taxon to "Pliosaurus", Simolestes, Liopleurodon, Pliosaurus and brachaucheninae. A feature of particular interest in the dentition of this new species is the presence of connecting carina
  2. will stevenson

    Oxford Clay croc tooth?

    Hi guys, I have this tooth from the Oxford clay and i was wondering if anyone could put a solid ID on it thanks
  3. Jurassic, Callovian, Oxford Clay, Peterborough Member. I found three this weekend I'm unsure about and would appreciate your thoughts. The first I think might be a decapod carapace.
  4. Ossicle

    Oxford Clay oddity

    Jurassic, Callovian, Oxford Clay, Peterborough Member, Yaxley, Cambridgeshire. The closest thing I can think of to what this looks like is a belemnite, but the overall shape is wrong, and the cross-section is very wrong for belemnites I've found at this site and elsewhere. I haven't completely ruled that out though, and opinions would be appreciated.
  5. Hi, I wanted to ask about this marine reptile tooth from the Oxford Clay in England. The seller has listed it as a Pliosaur tooth belonging to the species Simolestes Vorax, and I wanted to check the id. Thanks in advance!
  6. Jurassic, Callovian, Oxford Clay, Peterborough Member, Yaxley, Cambridgeshire I've found a few of these recently, and been trying to puzzle them out. I had thought they might be crab claws. Today I found my largest and best preserved one so far. I can clearly see plates, but I haven't found plates on images of Jurassic crustaceans, including in Martill. What it more looks like is the diagram of Ophiuroids in the book, which is what @JamieLynn, suggested might be the case, due to the plates. I have found brittle star at the site before,
  7. As it's too stormy to collect fossils... Jurassic, Callovian, Oxford Clay, Peterborough Member, Whittlesey, Cambridgeshire. This was something very odd I found from a concretion in the Oxford Clay. They are great for three dimensional fossils such as ammonites. It looks like wood, in which case it's my first bit that isn't carbonised, or possibly bone. It could also simply be mineral. Another possibility is fish. I really wish there was more of it, that might have cleared it up, and would appreciate your thoughts.
  8. Oxford clay, Peterborough Member, Jurassic, Callovian, Whittlesey in Cambridgeshire I collected this a few years ago, and I'm unclear whether it's a large cephalopod hook, or part of a fish, or something else entirely. Any assistance would be greatly appreciated.
  9. Ossicle

    Bone or not bone?

    Jurassic, Callovian, Oxford clay, Peterborough Member, near Yaxley in Cambridgeshire. These are fragments I've picked up over time, wondering if they have bone texture or not. The bits I have that are unequivocally bone have better indicators. Opinions would be very welcome. The first I keep in my miscellaneous pile. These are all the same piece of rock. With something so small, even if it is bone, is it something that is potentially identifiable?
  10. Ossicle

    Oxford Clay - Hybodont?

    Oxford clay, Peterborough Member, Jurassic, Callovian, near Yaxley in Cambridgeshire. I spent the morning getting muddy in wet clay, and found this. I think it might be part of a hybodont spine, or other ornate fish spine. I've collected a fragment of hybodont spine from this site before. The surface does seem to be enamel, and the shape is slightly curved. Any assistance greatly appreciated.
  11. I got the chance to go to the Oxford Clay twice over the last few days. I'm always looking for echinoderms at this site, and I prefer this one in winter when the vegetation has died back and I can spot lots of small, delicate detail. These are some if my favourite finds from the last few days.
  12. I'm trying to determine if these are echinoid. I found these two on an Oxford Clay trip yesterday, Jurassic, Callovian, Peterborough Member, near Yaxley in Cambridgeshire. The first is, I think, a partial echinoid spine. My only doubts are because it's quite different from the others I've found at the site, it's a very different pattern. I would appreciate another opinion. The second has completely confused me. It looks black, so I thought it was pyrite, but when I photographed it, it's clearly a completely different material. It's a very odd sh
  13. It's been a sunny and very, very cold day. Most of the finds at the Yaxley site are small and intricate, lots of crinoid ossicles. What pops depends a lot on the weather conditions - today I found a lot of lighter coloured fossils, including my first coprolite from this site. There are a few I think I'll ask for help to ID.
  14. I convinced my friend in England to send me some matrix from the Oxford Clay site I have the pleasure of hunting a few years ago. I really wanted to see what I could find in the micro stuff! He packed up a "Fosters sized package of Pay Dirt" as he referred to it and I got it in the mail a couple of weeks ago. It didn't take me long to go through it because I just couldn't stop! So many beautiful tiny fossils!! Star Crinoids, Belemnites, Ammonites, all of those I expected to find. What I was surprised to find was lots of tiny crab claws, couple of shark teeth and some possible Starfish ossicles
  15. Hi all, I recently decided to buy the below plesiosaur vertebra after having seen it for a long, long time. It dates to the Callovian of the Oxford Clay and was found at Peterborough. I suspect it may be attributed to Muraenosaurus leedsi, as it comes from a cryptoclidid plesiosaur, but is both larger and more elongate that the typical Oxford Clay Cryptoclidus vertebrae I'm familiar with. Supposedly coming from an old collection, it has a blackened exterior that doesn't cover the entire piece, with the more common buff colour visible underneath. As such, I expecte
  16. Harry_

    Fish jaw?

    I found these fossils in Hampton Vale (it's quite a well known and fosiliferous site). The site is Oxford clay and jurassic. When doing wet sifting I found lots of these fossils all about 3 or 4mm and I think they are all fish jaws as they r way too small for rodents. This is the first of a few posts I will be doing for id on some fossils from there. Any help is greatly appreciated :). The pictures are of a few I found. Thanks, Harry
  17. pachy-pleuro-whatnot-odon

    Unidentified Jurassic marine reptile bone

    Hi all, I've had the below piece in my collection for a number of years now, having acquired it thinking it was a juvenile plesiosaur propodial. It comes from the Oxford Clay of Peterborough and is of Callovian Jurassic age. However, when recently doing some research towards answering another question on TFF, I realised that - even though there's some plastic deformation going on - it doesn't quite look like the juvenile plesiosaur propodial I have from the rhaetic at Aust, nor does it look like a plesiosaur propodial
  18. PointyKnight

    Pachycormidae indet. - 'Hypsocormus' sp.

    From the album: Oxford Clay Fauna

    Pachycormidae WOODWARD 1895 indet. Jurassic, Callovian Oxford Clay, Peterborough Member [ A ] Orton Pit [ B ] Hampton Lakes, Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, UK Teeth from indeterminate, predatory pachycormid fish. Likely pertaining to either 'Hypsocormus' leedsi SMITH & WOODWARD 1889 or 'Hypsocormus' tenuirostris SMITH & WOODWARD 1889, which can be distinguished only by characters of the rostrum. Neither species actually belongs to Hypsocormus WAGNER 1860 according to MAXWELL et al. 2020, but are closer to more derived, macropredatory pachycormids like Orthocor
  19. PointyKnight

    Caturus porteri

    From the album: Oxford Clay Fauna

    Caturus porteri RAYNER 1948 Jurassic, Callovian Oxford Clay, Peterborough Member Must Farm, Whittlesey, Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, UK A scale from the medium-sized caturid Caturus porteri RAYNER 1948.
  20. PointyKnight

    Caturus megadontus (?=Osteorachis leedsi)

    From the album: Oxford Clay Fauna

    Caturus ?megadontus MARTILL 1985 (?= ?Osteorachis leedsi WOODWARD 1897) Jurassic, Callovian Oxford Clay, Peterborough Member Kings dyke, Whittlesey, Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, UK A tooth of the large, macropredatory caturid Caturus ?megadontus MARTILL 1985. MARTILL & HUDSON 1991 consider this species potentially synonymous with the contemporaneous and highly fragmentary caturid ?Osterorachis leedsi WOODWARD 1897, which would make ‘Caturus leedsi’ the valid name for this taxon.
  21. PointyKnight

    Muraenosaurus leedsii

    From the album: Oxford Clay Fauna

    Muraenosaurus leedsii SEELEY 1874 Jurassic, Callovian Oxford Clay, Peterborough Member Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, UK
  22. PointyKnight

    Liopleurodon ferox

    From the album: Oxford Clay Fauna

    Liopleurodon ferox SAUVAGE 1873 Jurassic, Callovian Oxford Clay, Stewartby Member Stewartby Pits, Bedford, Bedfordshire, UK ID: Paul de la Salle, KFM A small, juvenile pliosaur tooth showing distinct ornamentation referable to Liopleurodon.
  23. PointyKnight

    Marine Predator Coprolite

    From the album: Oxford Clay Fauna

    Coprolite Jurassic, Callovian Oxford Clay, Peterborough Member Hampton Lakes, Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, UK A coprolite from an indeterminate marine predator, showing inclusions of nacre, partially digested bone, and fish scales of Pholidophorus? sp. (an indeterminate pholidophorid) and Coccolepis sp. (an enigmantic coccolepid).
  24. PointyKnight

    Leedsichthys problematicus

    From the album: Oxford Clay Fauna

    Leedsichthys problematicus WOODWARD 1889 right ceratohyal fragment Jurassic, Callovian Oxford Clay, Peterborough Member Orton Pit, Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, UK ID: Jeff Liston, RTMP Colonised by additional fauna, including Gryphaea (Bilobissa) dilobotes and serpulid worms.
  25. Hi everyone, I recently bought this tooth on a whim. It was described as Diplocynodon sp. from the Kimmeridge Clay and reworked into the Albian-age Faringdon Sponge Gravels at the Wicklesham Pit. However, this description is obviously wrong in either species attribution or locality, since Diplocynodon is an alligatoroid genus dating to the Paleocene to middle Miocene, and could therefore not possibly have been found in the Sponge Gravels as Wicklesham Pit. Going by the label that came with the tooth, however, the seller whom I bought the
×
×
  • Create New...