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  1. From the album: Tertiary

    Bivalve Internal Molds (One on the left appears to be Cucullaea) Largest just over 1 inch Paleocene Vincentown Formation Rancocas Creek Vincentown, N.J.
  2. From the album: Tertiary

    Gastropod Internal Molds (largest 3/4 inch) Paleocene Vincentown Formation Rancocas Creek Vincentown, N.J.
  3. From the album: Tertiary

    Graphularia ambigua Branching Coral Pieces (longest over half an inch) Paleocene Vincentown Formation Rancocas Creek Vincentown, N.J.
  4. Jeffrey P

    Worm Tubes from the Vincentown Formation

    From the album: Tertiary

    Rotularia rotula Cioled Worm tubes (less than half an inch) Paleocene Vincentown Formation Rancocas Creek Vincentown, N.J.
  5. Three New Species of Primitive Ungulate Ancestors Identified from Wyoming University of Colorado Boulder , Sci News, Aug 18, 2021 Post-Jurassic Fossils Uncovered By CU Boulder Scientists Danielle Chavira, Channel 4, CBS, University of Colorado Boulder, August 18, 2021 The paper is: Atteberry, M.R. and Eberle, J.J., 2021. New earliest Paleocene (Puercan) periptychid ‘condylarths’ from the Great Divide Basin, Wyoming, USA. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, pp.1-29. Yours, Paul H.
  6. Fossil_teenager

    Large shells and large owls.

    I decided to go hit up a new creek that I’d had my eyes on for a while. I didn’t know whether or not this would have anything good in it, so I biked there to go find out myself. Let me say, for the 1 1/2 hour I biked to reach this place, I’m really happy with all that I found. I also saw one of the coolest owls I’ve ever seen. It was about 2 and a half feet in size and the color of it was orangish brown and black. I think it was a great horned owl, and it looked like this: It swooped down on a branch about 10 feet in front of me, looked me dead in the eyes,
  7. MDPaleoceneGeo

    Cretaceous or Paleocene Tooth/claw?

    croc tooth, or toe? Likely Cretaceous or Paleocene. Thoughts? scale in centimeters.
  8. historianmichael

    NJ Paleocene ID Help

    This past weekend I had the chance to collect at an exposure of the Paleocene Vincentown Formation in New Jersey. The trip was a lot of fun and a number of really cool fossils were found. I have been able to identify most of my finds except for these two mystery fossils. I recognize the shark tooth as a sand tiger but I was hoping someone might know which sand tiger it is. I saw online that someone listed Carcharias samhammeri in the Vincentown but I am not an expert on shark teeth so I am not sure if that is what this tooth is. Any help is greatly appreciated! #1- bryozoan?
  9. I found what looks to me to be a coral fossil in a stream in Kent county Maryland and I would like some help identifying it. I tried to make my pictures as clear as possible but the fossil is really small. If a picture from a different angle would be helpful please let me know. Thanks in advance!
  10. First off good to see everyone again. Been a good yr so far with fossils this year with new ones to add to collection. Time periods its hard to say except the horse tooth from 9-15000 yrs ago. Don't mind the mod podge on the connected spinal columns (I think) because the petrified black worms or seeds creeped me out. The coolest I think the petrified grass or leaf, but other finds especially the bones are up there too. Well enjoy and good to be back and if ideas on time frames give it a whirl. PS: Ill post more pics tomorrow with sizes to show how small some of this stuff is and etc.
  11. Chodge613

    Aquia Formation Bone Fragment

    Here I have attached pictures of a recent find I made in Maryland’s Aquia Formation. It’s a Paleocene bone from what I think is a turtle. What do y’all think? It’s very thin whatever it is.
  12. In Colorado there is a formation called the Dawson Formation also known as the Dawson Arkose Formation. The most common fossil by far is petrified wood and although I haven’t found any vertebrate fossils from dinosaurs and mammals have been found. It covers a relatively large time span from late Cretaceous to early Eocene, about 70-54 million years old. A member that has also found fossils in this formation, Blake @FossilDudeCO. Although it has been over three years since he was on his posts have still helped. He said that further south is Eocene but higher north in Parker and Aurora is Cretac
  13. bthemoose

    Maryland Paleocene sand tiger tooth

    I found the tooth below a couple of months ago at a Maryland Paleocene (Aquia Formation) site. Am I correct that it's Hypotodus verticalis? Thanks in advance for your help! The tooth measures just under 28 mm on the slant.
  14. I was eager to get out before the heatwave coming up so I made the visit to a couple new Cannonball sites the other day as well as property adjacent to where I collected the crabs this spring. I was expecting more good bivalve material from the first sites but I'm pretty happy with the results regardless. Sort of a continuation of this topic. I tried a few cuts before working my way down to the area I found the concretions in before. The material in all was extremely fragmented. I still need to bust that concretion. One of the inconspicuous cuts. More fragments.
  15. Going back several decades I have attempted to have an annual extended field trip; call it a fossil collecting vacation. Some years this happens, some it doesn't but this past November I had the opportunity to spend several days in the field visiting some of the classic Cretaceous and Paleogene river sites which abound in Alabama. Since I haven't had the opportunity to post much in my blog, I decided to post pictures from that trip here as I have time. First up are pictures from the lowermost Maastrichtian (~70 mya) Upper Cretaceous Bluffport Marl Member of the Demopolis Formation.
  16. I'm looking for a copy of Vertebrates of the Cannonball Formation (Paleocene) in North and South Dakota Alan M. Cvancara & John W. Hoganson Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology Vol. 13, No. 1 (Mar. 18, 1993), pp. 1-23 (23 pages) It's on Jstor but isn't currently available for free online reading. If anybody has a PDF I'd appreciate it.
  17. Kurt Komoda

    Douglas Point 6-16-21

    Drove down from Jersey to Douglas Point on Tuesday. Only my second time there, and I was worried that I'd make the 4 hour drive and it'd be crowded. Only one car when I got there around 1pm, and another pulled up as I was unpacking my gear. The narrow beach was pretty much open as the first vehicle was a family wayyy down over to the left playing in the water with a raft and the other was a lone fossil hunter hand searching the tide debris line. Beautiful day and I guess my take was pretty much around average for the site. I'm quite fine with that and I look forward to returning. Mo
  18. bthemoose

    Douglas Point 6-4-21

    I went out to Douglas Point (Paleocene, Aquia Formation) in Maryland yesterday to see what fossils the recent rains helped bring out. I tried last weekend as well, but I didn't find a ton as it was too close to the storms and the Potomac River was running choppy and high with little beach exposed, even at low tide. Yesterday the water was calmer and lower and I had a more successful hunt. It's definitely the time of year for snakes! (They're almost all non-venomous around here.) I encountered this one a few minutes into my hunt and saw four others throughout the day.
  19. bthemoose

    Paleocene bone

    I found the small bone below yesterday while out at Douglas Point in Maryland, which exposes the Aquia Formation (Paleocene - Thanetian). It has the look and feel of fossilized bones from the area and it passed the burn test, so I'm fairly sure it's a fossil. This is the most complete bone I've found at this site. Any ideas what it might be from? Side 1: Side 2: Side 3: Side 4: Ends:
  20. On the 1st I had the opportunity for another trip and made it out to Morton County. I was waiting until now to post the report because I wanted to finish preparing a crab to include in the report but I've been busy. I went to one Fox Hills Formation site but mostly I had sites lined up from the Paleocene Cannonball Formation and some Fort Union Group formations. Compared to Emmons County across the Missouri River there is less Fox Hills Formation and it is replaced mostly by the overlying Hell Creek Formation and Paleocene units. Some scenery showing outcrops of the Cannonball Form
  21. Snaggletooth19

    Douglas Point Shark Tooth ID Help

    Went out to Douglas Point (Potomac River, MD, Paleocene, Aquia Formation) on June 5th, first time taking the kids and we had a great time. Found a lot of sand tiger teeth as is typical. But this one has me a little stumped. The crown seems too wide at the base to be a sand tiger tooth. Could it be a small or juvenile Otodus? Or is it some kind of sand tiger after all?
  22. bthemoose

    Otodus obliquus parasymphyseal?

    I found this perfect little tooth today along the Potomac River in Maryland (Paleocene, Aquia Formation), which I think may be an Otodus obliquus parasymphyseal. The root isn't as oversized as megatooth shark parasymphyseals I've seen posted elsewhere on the forum, but it sure looks like an Otodus, is laterally compressed, and is quite tiny compared to other Otodus I've found. @MarcoSr, @siteseer, @Al Dente, and others, what do you think? This tooth bears similarities to another I found from this location several weeks ago (tooth on the right
  23. It's been a long while since I've had the opportunity to go hunting - indeed, trips have been far and few between. But the few I have had have been lucrative. There's been quite a bit of new material, ending up with some new finds (for me, at least.) One of these was a complete ray mouth plate. A couple Otodus jumped into my hands as well, including this perfect one, about an inch. The wildlife was out in full, including a dog that must have been born into the hobby Thanks, FA
  24. bthemoose

    An Otodus kind of day

    I made a trip out to Douglas Point today and had one of those incredible fossil days that just makes you want to head out over and over again. There were two cars in the lot already when I arrived early this morning but their occupants must have been up to something else because I never saw them and I had the beach all to myself for most of the day. It was a chilly but beautiful morning on the banks of the Potomac. There's just no better sight at Douglas Point than a nice Otodus obliquus tooth waiting for you in the sand.
  25. This riker mount displays the best shark teeth that I collected on 3 hunts sifting at Douglas Point beach, Charles County, Maryland. This is the Paleocene Aquia Formation. Bottom row contains several Odotus teeth. There are many goblin shark Anomotodon and sand tiger shark Carcharias. Also appears to be one pygmy white shark Paleocarcharodon in lower left corner.
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