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  1. Snaggletooth19

    Some Fun Finds at Douglas Point

    This past Thursday, I made a trip out to Douglas Point along the Potomac. I enjoy going in warm weather like anyone, but going during the winter has its own merits. Cool, crisp air, fewer people, possibly some more unique finds. I was the only one on the beach for just about the whole morning and afternoon. Although a little chilly, the right gear made it no problem at all. The trail down to the beach is a bit run down. Lots of broken and collapsed trees covering the trail. I found quite a few sand tiger teeth. I only keep the larger ones now that I find and leave the
  2. Snaggletooth19

    Douglas Point Finds ID Confirmation

    Hi all. This past Thursday I made it out to Douglas Point (Paleocene, Aquia Formation). I found the usual assortment of sand tiger shark teeth and some goblin shark teeth too. Unfortunately, finding an Otodus in this formation still eludes me. First is a picture of all my finds. What I'd like some ID help with are the vertebrae, the two bone fragments, and the crocodile tooth. The last tooth is an interesting one. Looks like a Hemipristis serra tooth to me, though I didn't think they're found in this formation. I included an in-situ photo with the characteristic Douglas/Purse grav
  3. Fossil_teenager

    I thought it was a bone…

    I went to my local spot, Henson creek, and decided to check things out. I arrived and found some stingray and sand tiger shark teeth. I stumbled upon what I thought was bone, it totally turned out not to be bone. I am very happy about this find, even though it was the only thing of significance found today it doesn’t matter. It’s so perfect. It will probably be a while before I find another otodus tooth that size again! Here’s the photos: The total length is over 1.5 inches, and would probably be hitting 1.75 if complete. What
  4. HemiHunter

    Paleocene marine turtle bone?

    A few weeks ago I found this bone fragment on the Potomac at a Paleocene site. It has a distinctive indentation which I thought might allow for an ID. An initial suggestion was a turtle bone, maybe a peripheral bone where a rib ending would attach. But I am open to any other ideas. I understand there may not be enough to go on. Thanks for looking!
  5. In the September 2021 issue of "Natural History" magazine, there's an article, "The Trans-Saharan Seaway," by Devin Reese, Robert V. Hill. and Leif Tapanila. Anyone who collects fossil shark teeth knows Morocco and other parts of northern Africa were submerged by an inland sea as recently as the early-middle Eocene but there was also an arm of the sea that cut south all the way from what is now Algeria to what is now the Gulf of Guinea. The article summarizes the work of a team of geologists and paleontologists across a ten-year period in the early 2000's. It reviews a number of fossil find
  6. bthemoose

    Chunky Otodus

    I made it out to the Potomac yesterday in Maryland and finally found a 2" (almost) Otodus obliquus tooth! IMG_5728.mp4 It's worn and missing both cusplets unfortunately (have to have a reason to keep looking, right?), but this has been near the top of my Maryland bucket list fossils. It's tad less than 2" (1.91"/48.6 mm), but also very wide (1.38"/35.1 mm) with a nice chunky root. I'll round up. Here it is next to my previous largest Otodus personal find (1.59"/40.4 mm), from February. The new one is
  7. Fossil_teenager

    Aquia crawl

    Hey guys, I'm back from my trip out at sea. It was a very insightful and unforgettable experience. Learned a lot about the world around, and myself as well. anyways, enough about that, I went out to Douglas point yesterday and although it was a very short day, it was also extremely productive. Which included some pristine sand tigers, a perfect 1 1/2 inch croc, and a killer Otodus. Here’s everything good I found: (Idk why it goes in sideways but there’s the total of everything found). Front (or backside technically) of the best teeth
  8. historianmichael

    Paleocene Sand Tiger Shark Tooth

    I was hoping to get some help identifying this Paleocene sand tiger shark tooth from the Aquia Formation. I tried to compare it to the examples on Elasmo but I know that there is a lot of variation in teeth and I am by no means an expert. I thought it looked like a Striatolamia but I did not see any striations- maybe they were worn off. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you so much and happy Thanksgiving!
  9. I was fortunate to find an excellent Palaeocarcharodon orientalis tooth this morning at Douglas Point (Paleocene, Aquia Formation) in Maryland. I thought it was an Otodus obliquus at first but then I bent down and saw the serrations. The tip is a little dinged, but it has a solid root, shiny enamel, both cusplets, and those classic ragged serrations. At a little over 34 mm long, it's quite large for the site. I also found my first section of fossilized croc jaw (also just over 34 mm long) today, which still has two teet
  10. Hello to all of you guys, a couple of weeks before i asked for help in relation with some shark teeth, and the help indeed was very nice! A couple days before i was back in field trip and found some more teeth from the same strata, and would need your help for the correct ID (hopefully at species or genus level), you guys are awesome!!! Here´s the list of the fossils (each step of the ruler is 2mm): 1) A tiny tooth with very small roots and 3 denticles, the central and main one is triangular and very oblicuous 2) A tooth with very triangular cusplets and
  11. Barrelcactusaddict

    Fushun Amber (Guchenzgi Fm., 56-50 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber from Around the World

    A small, partially broken nodule of amber from the West Open Pit Mine in Fushun, China, weighing .8g and measuring (mm) 15x11x10. The mine was closed in 2019, but small pieces of amber are still recovered from coal found in the gangue piles; it is separated from the matrix by mechanical action and immersion in large vats of saltwater solution, and recovered with netting as it collects at the surface. This material is hard, takes a high polish, and is often shaped and drilled to make beads. Its chemical and spectrographic signatures indicate this amber is derived from a cupressaceous source.

    © Kaegen Lau

  12. Barrelcactusaddict

    Fushun Amber (Guchenzgi Fm., 56-50 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber from Around the World

    A small run of amber from the West Open Pit Mine in Fushun, China, weighing .7g and measuring (mm) 11x15x9; the oblique view better displays the slightly oxidized surface of the largest flow in the piece. The mine was closed in 2019, but small pieces of amber are still recovered from coal found in the gangue piles; it is separated from the matrix by mechanical action and immersion in large vats of saltwater solution, and recovered with netting as it collects at the surface. This material is hard, takes a high polish, and is often shaped and drilled to make beads. Its chemical and spectrographi

    © Kaegen Lau

  13. Barrelcactusaddict

    Fushun Amber (Guchenzgi Fm., 56-50 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber from Around the World

    A small run of amber from the West Open Pit Mine in Fushun, China, weighing .7g and measuring (mm) 11x15x9; note the several flow lines of successive runs. The mine was closed in 2019, but small pieces of amber are still recovered from coal found in the gangue piles; it is separated from the matrix by mechanical action and immersion in large vats of saltwater solution, and recovered with netting as it collects at the surface. This material is hard, takes a high polish, and is often shaped and drilled to make beads. Its chemical and spectrographic signatures indicate this amber is derived from

    © Kaegen Lau

  14. Barrelcactusaddict

    Fushun Amber (Guchenzgi Fm., 56-50 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber from Around the World

    A small run of amber from the West Open Pit Mine in Fushun, China, weighing .7g and measuring (mm) 11x15x9. The mine was closed in 2019, but small pieces of amber are still recovered from coal found in the gangue piles; it is separated from the matrix by mechanical action and immersion in large vats of saltwater solution, and recovered with netting as it collects at the surface. This material is hard, takes a high polish, and is often shaped and drilled to make beads. Its chemical and spectrographic signatures indicate this amber is derived from a cupressaceous source.

    © Kaegen Lau

  15. Barrelcactusaddict

    Fushun Amber (Guchenzgi Fm., 56-50 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber from Around the World

    Roughly 200g of small (≈1g) nodules and runs of amber from the West Open Pit Mine in Fushun, China; the mine was closed in 2019, but small pieces of amber are still recovered from coal found in the gangue piles; it is separated from the matrix by mechanical action and immersion in large vats of saltwater solution, and recovered with netting as it collects at the surface. This material is hard, takes a high polish, and is often shaped and drilled to make beads. Its chemical and spectrographic signatures indicate this amber is derived from a cupressaceous source.

    © Kaegen Lau

  16. bthemoose

    Douglas Point 10-17-21

    After going several weeks without fossil hunting, due to weather, schedule, etc., I finally made it out to Douglas Point (Paleocene, Aquia Formation) in Maryland this morning on a very pretty, cool autumn day. My first fossil find of the day was a small piece of ratfish plate. Below is my first shark tooth of the day (a sand tiger, like the vast majority of teeth found here). By the standards of this site, the quantity of shark teeth was low today, but they were in better than average shape, which isn't a bad trade off. Many appeared to be fres
  17. Took the relatively short trip down to Purse State Park last weekend and had quite a bit of success! Best find was certainly a fairly large chuck of what I think is turtle shell, along with a very much alive turtle that rested with us for our lunch before returning to the water. The dream of finding anything marine mammal or a somewhat complete ray plate remains for next time!
  18. Jurassicz1

    Paleocene bone

    I found this bone in Limhamn, Malmö, Sweden Paleocene in age (Danian) Does anyone possibly know what animal it belonged to? Now I'm not good with bones but I'm thinking bird? Crocodiles, Birds, Fish has been found at this locality. + another bone?
  19. bockryan

    Shark Tooth from Purse State Park

    Hi everyone! I tried this one on the FB group without any luck, hoping for some ideas here. This was found in Purse State Park (now Nanjemoy WMA, I think) on the shoreline, which I've read is Paleocene in age. This is by far the most interesting tooth I've found there so far, but I haven't seen an obvious match in any of the guides I've looked at. Does anyone have any ideas?
  20. austinswamp

    Venericardia bulla

    Hello I found this well preserved fossil along the Colorado river in south central TX, Bastrop county. The Kincaid formation is exposed along a nearby creek as well. Hoping to confirm my suspicions, thanks
  21. This new site I’m going to is kind of starting to grow on me! I really love the abundance of well preserved shells and the sharks teeth that come out of here (if I don’t break them) are in superb condition. I arrive at this site, however, with some disappointment. Footprints everywhere, and discarded rocks piled in a pile i know I didn’t leave with a bunch of broken shells. It looks like someone took the liberty of smashing rocks with a hammer and leaving the place a mess for others. Not a good look to be honest I always try to clean my area and make it look better than where I left it. The go
  22. HemiHunter

    Aquia Formation Croc Tooth ID

    Yesterday, I found what I think may be a little Pristichampsus tooth. It is from the Aquia formation on the Virginia side of the Potomac. It looks unusual for a croc tooth for being so laterally-compressed. I can't tell whether it ever had serrations at the base. They may have worn off but there are no obvious ones. Also, this tooth would match the short piece of juvenile croc jaw I found elsewhere in the Aquia last year which had a similarly-shaped (unerupted) tooth. Any thoughts?
  23. Hello to all of you guys, I´m a newbie to the forum, so i would like to before anything, say hi to everyone here And with that already said, i would need some help with the identification of some fossils of Elasmobranchii, that I have seen near the coast of south central Chile. The fossils are 2 teeth and something else that I´m unable to ID correctly (I think maybe a vertebra? or some weird gastropod). The age of the sandstone that contains these should be around the Upper Paleocene. The fisrt tooth I think is from some (I think) sand tiger shark (so
  24. From the album: Tertiary

    Bryozoan Parts Paleocene Vincentown Formation Rancocas Creek Vincentown, N.J.
  25. From the album: Tertiary

    Bivalve Internal Molds (One on the left appears to be Cucullaea) Largest just over 1 inch Paleocene Vincentown Formation Rancocas Creek Vincentown, N.J.
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