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Found 198 results

  1. I found these fossils beneath a steel rail bridge in Maryland near the 4 locks of the C & O. You can find it. I think they may be Silurian, and are mostly brachiopods, including an adult brachiopod. Observe the fleshy muscle material in the center. Observe the 3 parasite wormy animals at the upper left. I think this was an old Brachiopod near death: It was infected with wormy parasites. Its muscle flesh was infected with a fungus that brought in sulfur in to react with the Iron in the water, creating pyrite which is yellow in the fossil. 400mya, the only yellow mineral was pyrite, Iron + Sulfur. This is how a senior paleozoic brachiopod dies. Observe. Out of respect, I am giving this animal the name Jesse, after my Grandfather. Jesse died of old age and we salute him.
  2. My family decided to take a few day trips to Delaware’s beaches this summer. We went to a few, and heeding some posts by @I_gotta_rock, I kept an eye out for fossils. I found a few, but three were good enough to show. No one knows which formation exactly they come from, only that they are Paleozoic. Sounds like a good Thesis to me. Anyway here we are, first a worn coral bit, kinda like a petosky stone. .7 inches
  3. Is this an egg??

    Found this in Alexandria, TN (DeKalb Co.)
  4. Recaus,worth your time 10 Mb,or thereabouts
  5. There is a website that describes a controversial fossil found in 2003: http://www.abc.net.au/science/articles/2003/11/10/984724.htm Since it doesn't have a name at the time of publishing, I'm finding it difficult to find more information on it.
  6. Isotelus

    I found this last month on a visit to an abandoned limestone quarry near Naponee, Ontario. Though I am not very familiar with the Trilobites of this area, I believe it's an Isotelus. If I'm wrong with this identification, please tell me. It looks like there could be more of it underneath the sediment, and there is some matrix covering the pleura. This limestone is flaky and darker than any I have seen before. How would I go about prepping this? Though I've heard many people use sand, should I use something less abrasive, like baking soda? Thanks for the help.
  7. Miscellaneous texanian reconstructions

    I am hoping these are/can be of some use Offhand,I couldn't think of any other recons that showed the Permian basin* outlined * used here as a structural/hydrocarbon basin analysis term Desmoinesian(pars)/"Strawn"
  8. Triarthrus finds

    Hello again! This post will be about some beautifully preserved Triarthrus fossils (and my first complete Trilobite finds). Some of them even have the eyes preserved! I found these at a local train station, and the site of significant construction lately. I believe most of the to be E. eotoni, and the last one to be E. rougensis or spinosus. It may not be visible in the picture, but the last one has a streak of pyrite along the side of its cephalon / upper thorax. Could this be some kind of soft body tissue preservation, similar to those of the Beecher's Trilobite bed?
  9. World's First Animals Caused Global Warming

    Scientists Just Found The Cause of Earth's First Global Warming That Triggered Mass Extinctions Michelle Starr, Science Alerts, July 3, 2018 https://www.sciencealert.com/world-s-first-animals-cambrian-explosion-global-warming-mass-extinction World's first animals caused global warming University of Exeter, PhysOrg, July 2, 2018, https://phys.org/news/2018-07-world-animals-global.html https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/07/180702094038.htm http://www.exeter.ac.uk/news/featurednews/title_667955_en.html The abstract is at: Sebastiaan van de Velde et al, Early Palaeozoic ocean anoxia and global warming driven by the evolution of shallow burrowing, Nature Communications (2018) vol. 9, Article number: 2554 , DOI: 10.1038/s41467-018-04973-4 https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-018-04973-4 Electronic supplementary material for above paper at: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-018-04973-4#Sec14 https://static-content.springer.com/esm/art%3A10.1038%2Fs41467-018-04973-4/MediaObjects/41467_2018_4973_MOESM1_ESM.pdf Peer Review file for this paper at: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-018-04973-4#Sec14 https://static-content.springer.com/esm/art%3A10.1038%2Fs41467-018-04973-4/MediaObjects/41467_2018_4973_MOESM2_ESM.pdf Yours, Paul H.
  10. Fossil ID

    This may or may not actually be a fossil. It is a cylindrical, shimmering white streak on the Shale. It is only about an inch long. This may just be another mineral inclusion, or some discoloured sediment. Any help with identifying this would be appreciated!
  11. Ordovician Road Cut

    Yesterday, I was lucky enough to attend a very special field trip with the Eastern Ontario Natural History Society to a massive road cut in Ontario. The rock exposed was Ordovician aged limestone, and it produced some amazing fossils. I might need some id help with some of these. The giant cephalopod was by far the best thing I found! 1. Giant Cephalopod (with hand for scale) Camerocerad or Endoceras? 2. Crinoid stems, bryozoans and Gastropod 3. Partial trilobite pygidia
  12. Excursion/Field guide/IOWA

    here(lessthan 5 Mb) The Cedar Valley/Lime Creek piece by some noted experts would seem to steal the show. Fig 3, with its correlation chart. (useful inclusion of a Vail Transgressive/Regressive cycle chart!!!!) Figure gets better and more useful each time I look at it.
  13. Splitting Nodules And Concretions

    Hello TFF members! I have just found several strange circular rocks on a fossil hunt a few minutes ago, which I believe to be either nodules or concretions. What should I do to split these rocks? I know that I should probably not try to break them with a hammer and chisel, and instead use the freeze-thaw process. This is my first experience with nodules or concretions, so I am not very knowledgeable on this topic. Is there a specific recommended length of time I should leave them in the cold? How long should I thaw them for? How many times should I put them through the process before seeing cracks? How cold should the environment be for the freezing to work? If they are in fact nodules or concretions, I will post pictures of my finds (or lack thereof)!
  14. Agnostid?

    I found this fossil a few days ago at an exposure of the Billings Shale. It was found associated with Triarthrus glabellas and brachiopods. It's structure leads me to believe that it's either an Isotelus pygidium or an agnostid, although I do not know of any agnostics described in this formation and age.
  15. Anthology Of Unidentified Fossils

    Hi again! This will probably be my last ID post for a while. This time, I've decided to put all of the Unidentified fossils in one post. These are all from the Ordovician aged Billings Shale. Help identifying these will be much appreciated! 1. Leaf-shaped imprint. Mineral inclusion? 2. Trilobite fragment? 3. Dark markings and furrows. Burrows?
  16. Hello TTF! This post will contain the pictures of my science fair board, as well as the awards I received from it. Sorry for the delay, I know that some members posted requests for these months ago, but I have been busy with other things lately. I actually left part of the board at school by accident for weeks. I hope the pictures are clear enough!
  17. Repairing Fossils In Shale

    Recently, I have been out fossil hunting more often than usual, and many of them have since been damaged. Some were broken during transportation, and others were broken as I excavated them. The fossils are all from the black Billings Shale, which fractures easily. Is there any way that I can repair them without leaving any obvious markings?
  18. Unknown fossil

    Hi there! This spring I started collecting fossils, and I found this one in rock-glen park down in Arkona. Any ideas what it is? I'm looking for recommendations on where to go next - hungry hollow is apparently only open to groups but I've heard its a great place. Any others in the area?
  19. Bit parts

    nowaklethd_arthropodan_microfossils_f.pdf about 3,8 Mb
  20. Triarthrus?

    Hi TFF! I have just found a very interesting fossil near my home which I suspect might be the articulated left and right pleura of a Triarthrus. I have already found other fragments of Triarthrus in the same rock outcrop. (Glabellas, pleura, cephalons, etc.) It may also be a graptolite or something similar.
  21. Orthocone or Hyolithid?

    Another fossil for ID! This time, I think that I have some possible orthocone nautiloids from the Billings Shale. I found these near a small construction site near my house. Although I suspect them to be cephalopods, they may also be Hylothids. Or, they could be something else entirely! I am not an expert on these faunas at the moment, so I may be wrong. Each photo is of a different specimen. Thanks in advance! More posts about the regional science fair are to follow.
  22. Identifying trilobites for a friend

    A friend found a few small tubs of fossils that she hadn't seen in years until she started moving stuff around last week for a possible move. She asked me if I could come over and look at what she found. Most of the specimens don't have a label but some of it is obvious to anyone who's been to shows and had friends who collect fossils as well. I don't specialize in invertebrates or plants but I know an Elrathia from Utah, a Lovenia from Australia, and a Metasequoia from British Columbia when I see them because I have a few of each myself. She has some trilobites that are out of my wheelhouse so I thought I would ask the forum for identifications. The one below is from Morocco and apparently a Devonian form related to Phacops. I forgot to note the dimensions or ask for the photos to have a ruler included but the specimen is about an inch and a half (approx 4cm) as I recall. The second one is also from Morocco. I think that plate has two of the same (Cambrian and related to Paradoxides). The third is also from Morocco and Devonian, I think. Thanks for any info that can be provided especially if you have an idea of the general locality. I have a few more photos to post but have to go now. Jess
  23. Ammonite tease

    I was up in Cloudcroft on an errand and thought I might as well drive a few miles along Forest Service Road 5661, just south of the town. Here, Pennsylvanian sedimentary rocks are exposed along the cuts of the gravel road. You see a lot of pieces of fossils, but so far, anything remotely approaching whole has escaped me. Also, the rock does not seem to fracture in any kind of systematic plane, but rather at random and often right through the center of a fossil, leaving a thin section exposed and not a "half." But the stuff is there. It is frustrating. And then this thing ...
  24. Coral, Sponge or Bryozoan?

    I'm stumped. I've been collecting erratics off the beach along the Delaware Bay for the last six months and I keep coming up with mysteries. This specimen is 1" long. Unfortunately, because it is an erratic, all I can tell you is that rocks of this type wash down from the Appalachians all along the Delaware River and Bay til it reaches the Atlantic Ocean. They are Paleozoic, but I don't know enough of the geology from PA and NJ to narrow it down by rock type to a formation. Can't find a high enough resolution GEO Survey map, either. Other fossils in this type of rock are rugose corals, tabulate corals, bryozoa, and pinhead-sized crinoids, so big possible spread on the time frame. No trilobites yet, unfortunately! I have a small id sheet from the Mahantango Formation and an ID book for the Middle and Upper Devonian of NY, but neither have anything similar. I posted on the FB group and got three people saying it was one of these (yeah, I knew that) but each thought it was a different phylum. Can I get a consensus on phylum, if not a genus here? Can anyone give me links to good reference material for my other mysteries?
  25. This question just crossed my mind today, seemingly without provocation: What are the oldest known coprolites in the fossil record, whether from vertebrates or invertebrates? I know of Paleozoic coprolites, but is there any evidence of coprolites before that, perhaps from the Ediacaran? And if there are no pre-Cambrian coprolites recorded, what are the oldest known from the Paleozoic? I have a feeling that @GeschWhat might know a thing or two about this subject since, after all, she is the official Queen of Poopiness on TFF.
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