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Found 212 results

  1. cambrian geodynamics

    first,some colourful images:
  2. Its not often that I find something unrecognizable from the Cincinnatian. This was found last month in the southern extension of the arch that outcrops around Nashville. Any ideas?
  3. If anybody has read any Shubin,Clack,Coates,etc:this is indispensable,IMHO dioja37592.pdf wonderful coloured diagrams in this one,this is one of them
  4. inc.sedis,continued

    large download,about 24 Mb
  5. Scale Tree

    Kathleen B. Pigg of the University of Arizona notes that this "stem subsurface pattern that is sometimes called 'rabbit tracks'. The double track you see is probably a result of a pair of air channels that accompany the leaf trace through the cortex. The vertical ribs are produced by an increase of bark through secondary tissue production." The pair of sepicemns in the first image are the positive and negative impressions of the same piece. The second image is a detail from the same specimen.
  6. Seed?

    From the album Carbondale, PA

    I found a whole plate of these, but somehow only the one example made it home. 13mm long Carbondale, PA Lewellyn Formation Pennsylvanian period 299-323 myo
  7. Bark

    From the album Carbondale, PA

    Carbondale, PA Lewellyn Formation Pennsylvanian period 299-323 myo
  8. Fern

    From the album Carbondale, PA

    Carbondale, PA Lewellyn Formation Pennsylvanian period 299-323 myo
  9. Fern

    From the album Carbondale, PA

    Carbondale, PA Lewellyn Formation Pennsylvanian period 299-323 myo
  10. Fern

    From the album Carbondale, PA

    Carbondale, PA Lewellyn Formation Pennsylvanian period 299-323 myo
  11. Leaf Impression

    From the album Carbondale, PA

    Carbondale, PA Lewellyn Formation Pennsylvanian period 299-323 myo
  12. Cordaites Leaf

    From the album Carbondale, PA

    Parallel-veined Cordaites leaf with mystery impression superimposed. Carbondale, PA Lewellyn Formation Pennsylvanian period 299-323 myo
  13. Leaf Impressions

    From the album Carbondale, PA

    Carbondale, PA Lewellyn Formation Pennsylvanian period 299-323 myo
  14. Unidentified Plant Material

    From the album Carbondale, PA

    Carbondale, PA Lewellyn Formation Pennsylvanian period 299-323 myo
  15. Flora Hash Plate

    From the album Carbondale, PA

    Finely parallel-veined leaves of a Cordaites plant alongside the branch or root of a giant Lycopod (aka scale tree or club moss). The latter could grow up to 50 m high! found in Carbondale, PA Lewellyn Formation Pennsylvanian (Upper Carboniferous) period 299-323 myo
  16. Calamities Bark

    From the album Carbondale, PA

    Calamities sp., a tree-like plant with hollow, woody stem that grew more than 100 ft high (30m). Carbondale, PA. Lewellyn Formation Pennsylvanian period 299-323 myo
  17. Leaf Impressions

    From the album Carbondale, PA

    Pyrite (?) layer over shale Carbondale, PA Lewellyn Formation Pennsylvanian 299-323 myo
  18. Calamities bark

    From the album Carbondale, PA

    Calamities sp., a bamboo-like plant closely related to modern horsetails with hollow, woody stem that grew more than 100 ft high (30m). Carbondale, PA Lewellyn Formation Pennsylvanian period 299-323 myo
  19. Twig or root

    From the album Carbondale, PA

    Unidentified species of petrified wood Carbondale, PA Lewellyn Formation Pennsylvanian period 299-323 myo
  20. Lycopod Bark

    From the album Carbondale, PA

    Carbondale, PA Lewellyn Formation Pennsylvanian period 299-323 myo
  21. Lycopod Bark

    From the album Carbondale, PA

    Detail from previous image Carbondale, PA Lewellyn Formation Pennsylvanian period 299-323 myo
  22. Calamities Brand and Fern

    From the album Carbondale, PA

    Carbondale, PA Lewellyn Formation Pennsylvanian period 299-323 myo
  23. Scale Tree Bark

    From the album Carbondale, PA

    Syringodendron sp. (Sigillaria family) Carbondale, PA Lewellyn Formation Pennsylvanian period
  24. out,on a limb,non-water gait

    I had this one for a while now ,then saw the current paywall and decided to post this. Great insight into Mid Paleozoic vertebrate locomotion,musings on forelimb morphology and its role in terrestrialization,great grayscale 3d reconstruction . Short,and to the point. Ichtstega!NAE2012.pdf
  25. I've noticed that a lot of clades that first appear in the early Paleozoic seem to immediately be present across the globe, even though the continents at the time were mostly disconnected and separated by oceans. For example, (calcified) trilobites suddenly appear in Cambrian Stage 3, but are already present in Laurentia, Siberia and parts of Gondwana, despite the vast distance and oceanic separation of the landmasses. Similarly, Rugose corals appear in the late Middle Ordovician, but already seem to present across the equatorial regions of the globe. How did these benthic/sessile clades(so I'm not referring to pelagic trilobites) manage to spread geographically wide so fast? Is there any way we could know what landmass was the actual "birthplace" of some of them?
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