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  1. spinoking27

    Fossils in MA I discovered

    these are the fossils i discovered over at a sight in north Attleboro wanting to follow in the footsteps of a group of tuft university students who discovered a mayfly a few years ago this is the actual fossils i found. hoping I find a new species in rhode island just waiting to be discovered if that's possible today I still find them there and donate them at the natural history museum and planetarium in Providence RI sometimes you can see me carry a bag full of fossils i found
  2. historianmichael

    Pecopteris Species ID Help

    I am nearly finished with my review and reevaluation of all of my plant and fern findings from the Late Pennsylvanian Llewellyn Formation of Pennsylvania. I think that I have been fairly successful at identifying everything with their proper genus and species using the guide "Fossil Plants From the Anthracite Coal Fields of Eastern Pennsylvania." My hope is use this information with some nice photographs to put together an album under the Member Collection tab. However, one of the last things I need to review are my Pecopteris (or former Pecopteris) finds. I was wondering if any of the members
  3. paleo.nath

    Need help with ID

    I’ve just recently found this fossil in the North Attleboro fossil locality and need help identifying, it is a little bit longer than a half inch
  4. A very small group of us ventured into the wilds of northern PA last weekend, equipped with masks and a permit to poke around a state wildlife preserve with Carboniferous Lewellyn Formation exposures. It was a gorgeous day and the colors of the limestone really shone in the sunlight. As we got there, a pair of permit-less fossil poachers were just leaving. How do I know that they didn't have a permit? Because they absolutely did not follow the rules. Since it is a wildlife preserve, it is important that anyone looking for fossils not leave craterous holes in the ground and replant
  5. Agos1221

    Mazon Creek Fern ID Help?

    Hi again! I feel very fortunate to have such great minds helping to ID fossils here. I have one other Mazon Creek fossil that I would like some help with it. It’s a fairly large (5 inch) fossil fern nodule from Mazon Creek. My first question is, is this the common fern species variety Pecopteris? I think it might be but I see some variation within the leaves (that is the fern degree terminations). Is it unusual or rare to find ferns with them still attached to the plant stock/shaft from Mazon Creek? Last question, are the oriented dots on some of the ferns fossilized sporangia? I c
  6. From the album: My Collection

    My current personal best from the Carboniferous aged shale of Rhode Island. A large, Pecoptertis sp. section.
  7. KingSepron

    Plant!

    From top to bottom it is 5.5 cm. Leaf size about 2-3 cm depending on which you’re looking at. Area is Betteshanger, a Carboniferous area
  8. Conditions in Western PA have been unusually warm recently, with highs in the 40s and 50s. I decided to take advantage of this warm spell by getting a little bit of fossil hunting in. I decided to do a hunt focused on plants as I’ve been hunting for vertebrates for the better part of the last year and a half and, although I could never get tired of vertebrates I thought some variety was well overdue. So I headed to one of my favorite plant localities in the area. It is located in the Connellsville Sandstone of the Casselman Formation, which is in turn the upper half of the Conemaugh Group. T
  9. jonnyquest

    Carboniferous Terrificous

    Here are some fossils I found in the town of St.clair in Schuylkill county , Pennsylvania. Llewellyn formation. 300 Mya. preserved in black shale.
  10. Bguild

    Pecopteris sp.

    From the album: Cory's Lane, Rhode Island Fossils

    Pecopteris sp. Found in 2019 at Cory's Lane fossil locality, Rhode Island.
  11. I'm looking for opinions on this one..... I consulted a VERY old volume and found what I believe is a match... ESPECIALLY since the book's diagram was from my immediate area of Johnstown, Pennsylvania USA. This is from my Wednesday Feb. 21 hunt. The data on the fossil: Rt 56 Bypass, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian Period (290-330 Million Years Ago) Fern leaves called Pecopteris grew abundantly in the coal swamps of the Carboniferous Period. These leaves dropped off of a 35 foot fern tree called “Psaronius“, one of the most common Paleozoic types. With its sp
  12. In between all of the 4th of July weekend barbecues I was able to make it down to Cory's Lane, Rhode Island for a few hours of shale splitting. The day started out slow with only a few small plant imprints found, but I eventually managed to rip up a 5 foot slab of rock with a larger fern section on one end of it. After cutting the slab down to a little over a foot and a half in length this Pecopteris arborescens manages to go down as the largest fern I've found at this locality! It was a nice start to the long weekend, but the real win was the awesome weather .
  13. M.Mark

    Carboniferous tree fern

    Two days ago I bought this nice fossil for a very convenient price at a local shop. Unfortunately, the seller could not remember key informations about this specimen, but he told me that it probably was Pecopteris and came from Germany. I want to identify it for a proper display alongside my other Carboniferous fossils, but I need again some help from a more experienced collector. In my opinion it is very similar, if not identical, to an other Acitheca (Pecopteris) polymorpha specimen I previously identified on an old topic thanks to this wonderful community. It may be the same plant, bu
  14. Dpaul7

    Multiple Plants A.JPG

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Multiple Plant Fossil - Neuropteris, Pecopteris, Annularia Plant, other leaves. *Two-sided fossil Ferndale area of Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian - 323.2 -298.9 million years ago Fossils on both sides of specimen. This fine specimen shows two leaflets of Calamites, a member of the Calamitales which belong to the Sphenophytes. Whorls of small leaflets are arranged concentrically around a thin stem and are called Annularia or Asterophyllites. Calamites itself is the name originally given to a stem section, but now applies to the entire plant. These were indicative of
  15. Dpaul7

    Multiple Plants A.JPG

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Multiple Plant Fossil - Neuropteris, Pecopteris, Annularia Plant, other leaves. *Two-sided fossil Ferndale area of Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian - 323.2 -298.9 million years ago Fossils on both sides of specimen. This fine specimen shows two leaflets of Calamites, a member of the Calamitales which belong to the Sphenophytes. Whorls of small leaflets are arranged concentrically around a thin stem and are called Annularia or Asterophyllites. Calamites itself is the name originally given to a stem section, but now applies to the entire plant. These were indicative of
  16. Dpaul7

    Pecopteris Fern in Nodule.JPG

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Pecopteris Fern Fossil Nodule Indiana, USA Pennsylvanian - Carboniferous Period Fern leaves called Pecopteris grew abundantly in the coal swamps of the Carboniferous Period. These leaves dropped off of a 35 foot fern tree called “Psaronius“, one of the most common Paleozoic types. With its sparse and expansive branches, it resembled the modern day palm tree. It produced as many as 7000 spores on the underside of its leaves. These samples are well preserved in gray coal shale as many Carboniferous leaf fossils. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophtya (meaning vascular plant wi
  17. Dpaul7

    Pecopteris 000.JPG

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Pecopteris Fern Fossil From Pleasantville Mountain, Somerset Co., Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian - Carboniferous (323.2 -298.9 million years ago) Fern leaves called Pecopteris grew abundantly in the coal swamps of the Carboniferous Period. These leaves dropped off of a 35 foot fern tree called “Psaronius“, one of the most common Paleozoic types. With its sparse and expansive branches, it resembled the modern day palm tree. It produced as many as 7000 spores on the underside of its leaves. These samples are well preserved in gray coal shale as many Carboniferous leaf fossils.
  18. Dpaul7

    Pecopteris 000.JPG

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Pecopteris Fern Fossil From Pleasantville Mountain, Somerset Co., Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian - Carboniferous (323.2 -298.9 million years ago) Fern leaves called Pecopteris grew abundantly in the coal swamps of the Carboniferous Period. These leaves dropped off of a 35 foot fern tree called “Psaronius“, one of the most common Paleozoic types. With its sparse and expansive branches, it resembled the modern day palm tree. It produced as many as 7000 spores on the underside of its leaves. These samples are well preserved in gray coal shale as many Carboniferous leaf fossils.
  19. Dpaul7

    Pecopteris 000.JPG

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Pecopteris Fern Fossil From Pleasantville Mountain, Somerset Co., Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian - Carboniferous (323.2 -298.9 million years ago) Fern leaves called Pecopteris grew abundantly in the coal swamps of the Carboniferous Period. These leaves dropped off of a 35 foot fern tree called “Psaronius“, one of the most common Paleozoic types. With its sparse and expansive branches, it resembled the modern day palm tree. It produced as many as 7000 spores on the underside of its leaves. These samples are well preserved in gray coal shale as many Carboniferous leaf fossils.
  20. Dpaul7

    Pecopteris 000.JPG

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Pecopteris Fern Fossil From Pleasantville Mountain, Somerset Co., Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian - Carboniferous (323.2 -298.9 million years ago) Fern leaves called Pecopteris grew abundantly in the coal swamps of the Carboniferous Period. These leaves dropped off of a 35 foot fern tree called “Psaronius“, one of the most common Paleozoic types. With its sparse and expansive branches, it resembled the modern day palm tree. It produced as many as 7000 spores on the underside of its leaves. These samples are well preserved in gray coal shale as many Carboniferous leaf fossils.
  21. Bguild

    Large Pecopteris sp. Section

    From the album: Cory's Lane, Rhode Island Fossils

    Large imprint of Pecopteris sp. Found in 2017 at the Cory's Lane fossil locality, Rhode Island.
  22. Bguild

    Large Pecopteris arborescens

    From the album: Cory's Lane, Rhode Island Fossils

    Large Negative imprint of Pecopteris arborescens. Found in 2017 at Cory's Lane fossil locality, Rhode Island.
  23. Bguild

    Pecopteris arborescens

    From the album: Cory's Lane, Rhode Island Fossils

    Negative imprint of Pecopteris arborescens. Found in 2017 at the Cory's Lane fossil locality, Rhode Island.
  24. Bguild

    Pecopteris arborescens and Cyperites

    From the album: Cory's Lane, Rhode Island Fossils

    Positive and negative imprint of Pecopteris arborescens pinnules and Cyperites. Found in 2017 at the Cory's Lane fossil locality, Rhode Island.
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